New views on Limerick’s revolutionary past

first_imgNewsHeritageNew views on Limerick’s revolutionary pastBy Staff Reporter – August 1, 2018 3626 Previous articleLotsa luck for Limerick familyNext article#PHOTOS All-Ireland glory beckons for Limerick’s magnificent hurlers Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Print Limerick Post Show | Is fearr Gaeilge bhriste ná Béarla cliste Advertisement Facebook Linkedin New Report from MIC Reveals the Reality of Human Trafficking in Ireland WhatsApp Limerick’s Student Radio Station Wired FM Celebrates 25 Years on Air center_img Twitter TAGSheritagehistoryLimerick City and CountyMary Immaculate College Housing 37 Compulsory Purchase Orders issued as council takes action on derelict sites Is fearr Gaeilge bhriste ná Béarla cliste RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Free State soldiers outside Cruise’s Royal Hotel in 1922.Photo: National Library of Ireland.OVER the next five years, Ireland will commemorate the centenaries of seminal, but often difficult and controversial, events.As part of the commemorations, the Department of History at Mary Immaculate College (MIC) will host a free one-day conference on Limerick during the revolutionary years between 1918 and 1923.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The conference, ‘Limerick 1918-23: New Approaches’ will bring together leading scholars to better understand this important period in Limerick’s and, indeed, the country’s history on Saturday, September 1.According to event organiser and MIC history lecturer Dr Brian Hughes, the conference participants have been working with new themes, methodologies, and sources for history and commemoration of the Irish Revolution.“The research that will be presented reflects some the most recent and innovative additions to our knowledge of the revolutionary period in Limerick and further afield. Contributors will use local, national, and even international perspectives to help us better understand the events of 100 years ago.’The first session of the conference will bring highlight underused or neglected sources for social and political history of the period.Limerick Council Archivist Jacqui Hayes and Limerick Diocesan Archivist David Bracken will highlight material available in local archives that represent the upheaval of the period alongside the everyday lives of those who lived in the city and county.MIC history student, Winnie Davern, will use a collection of private family papers to highlight personal responses to the anti-conscription movement in 1918 while PhD graduate, Dr Seán William Gannon, will look at the experiences of disbanded members of the Royal Irish Constabulary in Limerick in 1922.Maynooth PhD candidate Jack Kavanagh will make innovative use of GIS mapping technology to provide a more detailed picture of Civil War participation and Dr Alexandra Tierney will reflect on the impact of suffrage and independence on the women of Limerick.In the final session, papers by Anna Lively from the University of Edinburgh and Síobhra Aiken from NUI Galway will examine the ways that those involved wrote about their experiences afterwards, in both memoirs and in novels, and how events like the Limerick Soviet have been remembered or, indeed, forgotten.Queen’s University Belfast Professor Fearghal McGarry’s keynote lecture will ask us to think about the history and commemoration of Ireland’s revolution in a global context.Full details at www.mic.ieby Tom [email protected] Week-long Celebration of Women as MIC Marks International Women’s Day Emaillast_img read more

EU Parliament voting to scrap roaming charges

first_img Man arrested in Derry on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences released EU Parliament voting to scrap roaming charges By News Highland – April 3, 2014 Twitter WhatsApp Google+ Facebook Dail to vote later on extending emergency Covid powers PSNI and Gardai urged to investigate Adams’ claims he sheltered on-the-run suspect in Donegal Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Pinterest RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest Roaming charges on calls, text and mobile data could become a thing of the past.The European Parliament is today expected to vote in favour of ending roaming charges across the EU, by December 2015.North West MEP Jim Higgins says the European Commission is also targeting poor quality broadband…..Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/jhigsroaming.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. HSE warns of ‘widespread cancellations’ of appointments next week WhatsApp Dail hears questions over design, funding and operation of Mica redress scheme News 70% of Cllrs nationwide threatened, harassed and intimidated over past 3 years – Report Previous articleMan robbed at knifepoint in DerryNext articleSlowey wants widespread consultation on new council chamber News Highland last_img read more

First bipolar benthic brooder

first_imgA bipolar distribution is one in which a taxon occurs at high northern and southern latitudes but is absent in the latitudes between. In spite of the large distance between the Arctic and Antarctic, there are records of biota with bipolar distributions, both currently and in the geological past. To date, combined morphological and genetic studies of organisms such as bacteria and foram-inifera have confirmed the occurrence of some species in both polar regions. Bipolar genera and families are also known in larger invertebrates, e.g. in crustaceans and molluscs, and a recent Census of Marine Life report suggested that more than 200 metazoan species may have bipolar distributions. Here we investigated specimens of the the cheilostome bryozoan Callpora weslawski from both Arctic and Antarctic localities. To our knowledge this is the first benthic brooder to be found in both polar regions and is the first record of a species of Callopora in Antarctic waters. We used scanning electron microscopy and statistical analyses to confirm the morphological identity of individuals. The encrusting nature of the species, its distribution in the deep Weddell Sea and its rarity mean that genetic confirmation of bipolarity may take years or decades. Possible paths of distribution are discussed, including the Pangea break-up, Plio-Pleistocene glaciations, isothermal submergence via off-shelf or abyssal currents and anthropogenic transport.last_img read more

Late Holocene changes in cyanobacterial community structure in maritime Antarctic lakes

first_imgDespite the dominance of cyanobacteria in polar freshwater aquatic ecosystems, little is known about their past biodiversity and response to climate and environmental changes. We explored the use of light microscopy of microfossils, high performance liquid chromatography of the fossil pigment composition and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of fossil 16S rRNA genes to study past and present-day differences in cyanobacterial community structure in response to climate changes in two adjacent maritime Antarctic lakes with contrasting depths (4 and 26 m) and light climates. Light microscopy was of limited use because of degradation of cell structures. Fossil cyanobacterial pigment concentrations were below the detection limits of our method in several sediment samples in the deep lake, but abundant and diverse in the sediment core from the shallow pond, probably as a consequence of increased light availability and/or a more diverse and abundant benthic cyanobacterial flora. Total carotenoid and chlorophyll concentrations were highest in both lakes between ca. 2,950 and 1,800 cal yr BP, which coincides with the late Holocene climate optimum recognised elsewhere in maritime Antarctica. Cyanobacterial molecular diversity was higher in the top few centimeters of the sediments in both lakes. In deeper sediments, the taxonomic turnover of cyanobacteria appeared to be relatively small in response to past climate anomalies in both lakes, underscoring the broad tolerance of cyanobacteria to environmental variability. This, however, may in part be explained by the low taxonomic resolution obtained with the relatively conserved 16S rRNA gene and/or the preferential preservation of particular taxa. Our results highlight the potential of fossil DNA in lake sediments to study colonization and succession dynamics of lacustrine cyanobacteria and warrant further investigation of the factors that affect preservation of cyanobacterial DNA.last_img read more