Council could lease ghost estate houses

first_imgNewsLocal NewsCouncil could lease ghost estate housesBy admin – March 31, 2011 748 Linkedin Email Facebook WhatsApp SOME houses lying vacant on unfinished estates in the city could be used for social housing, says Cllr Tom Shortt.He told a meeting of Limerick City Council this week that with 3,500 on the city’s waiting housing list, a special case could be put to the Department of the Environment that vacant properties be allocated to the council.“We should be negotiating for the sale or lease of some of these properties – some of them could be used for social housing – we should pursue this,” he urged.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Cllr John Gilligan pointed out that the council did not create the problem of ghost estates.“Water and sewerage is essential but we do not have the capacity to go in and finish all of the estates, but Cllr Ger Fahy said that Waller’s Close, which has 10 houses, requires just “some outside works remaining to be completed“As it is, we have vacant houses there which attract anti-social activity and become targeted”.Cllr Joe Leddin recommended that where there is a genuine problem with the provision of water and sewerage, the estates concerned should be categorised in terms of priority and value of the bonds outstanding, which in many cases, would not cover the costs involved.“We must ensure that we, as a local authority, are not out of pocket on this. Is there, I wonder, any provision for us to go in to these estates and carry out emergency works because as it is, we have people living on building sites, with fencing and hoardings torn down, and one unfinished estate has no bond – I thought this was essential to secure planning permission”.center_img Twitter Print Advertisement Previous articlePlea to bulldoze Hyde Road ‘eyesore’Next articleThomond Park to miss out on Inter Milan adminlast_img read more

Dominican rapper based in the US releases mixtape

first_imgJefferson Scotland, originally from Wallhouse, DominicaDominican born rapper, Jefferson ‘Klass Money’ Scotland, who is based in the United States, has unveiled his eagerly awaited mixtape, “Warrior Mind Frame” via his record label Route Change Music.“Warrior Mind Frame” embodies the true essence of Hip-Hop with the Caribbean born rapper’s intensive rhymes and remarkable flows.Klass Money has developed a solid fanbase in Florida and beyond and showcases once again with his latest project, “Warrior Mind Frame”, that he is the future candidate for XXL’s infamous Freshman list.The mixtape consist of 21 tracks and includes features from other popular rappers such as Young AC and Spitta Boi, production from Ulrich, Waxblend, Skip of We Loose and was mixed by Danny Russo, who has credits such as Ace Hood and Red Cafe.It is hosted by DJ Meat and DJ Lucky C, the blazing project features quality production, witty lyrics, and Klass Money’s unique personality.Klass Money – We Get it ft. Spitta Boi Prod. by Ulrich ( clean )Press Release EntertainmentLocalNews Dominican rapper based in the US releases mixtape by: – July 11, 2012 Share 63 Views   3 comments Sharecenter_img Share Sharing is caring! Tweetlast_img read more

Tipp minors have sights on All Ireland Prize

first_imgSo far Tipp have played five matches and have racked up wins against Waterford, Clare, Galway and Kildare. Tipperary set out early in the year to get to Croke Park and now the aim is to win the title over the Kingdom according to Tipp selector Shane Stapleton.The Golden Kilfeacle native says it’s a brilliant journey to be onSunday’s game throws-in at 1.15 in Croke Park and Tipp FM will have live commentary in association with Roscrea Express.last_img

Sumner County Historical & Genealogical Society to host “The Harvey Girls”

first_imgMichaeline Chance-ReaySubmitted to Sumner Newscow — Sumner County Historical and Genealogical Society in Wellington will host “The Harvey Girls’ Multicultural Workforce,” a presentation and discussion by Michaeline Chance-Reay on September 19, 2015 at 1 p.m. in the meeting room of the Wellington Public Library, 121 W. 7th, Wellington.Members of the community are invited to attend the free program. Contact the Sumner County Historical & Genealogical Society at 620-447-3266 or the Wellington Public Library at 620-326-2011 for more information. The program is made possible by the Kansas Humanities Council.The Fred Harvey Company not only hired recent immigrants to work in their famous Harvey House restaurants, they actively recruited them. Eventually, African American women became part of the workforce, and during World War II American Indians and Mexican Americans were hired as well. This presentation explores the job duties and working conditions of Harvey Girls from 1876 to the early 1950s.Michaeline Chance-Reay teaches courses in Women’s Studies and Education at Kansas State University. Her current research focuses on the Harvey Girls and historic sites on the K-State campus, especially those related to women.“Women in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries who wanted jobs or careers outside of the home had few choices,” said Chance-Reay, “but the Harvey Company offered unique opportunities.  It was demanding work but also offered a decent salary in a protected environment, in addition to travel and adventure.”“The Harvey Girls’ Multicultural Workforce” is part of the Kansas Humanities Council’s Humanities Speakers Bureau, featuring presentations and discussions that examine our shared human experience—our innovations, culture, heritage, and conflicts.Follow us on Twitter. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. There are no comments posted yet. Be the first one! Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more

Marching For Their Lives: 3,000 Protestors March Through Red Bank Calling…

first_imgMarchers held signs and chanted during the March For Our Lives event in Red Bank. Photo by Jay CookAs the the 10 a.m. start time approached, conversations among the demonstrators touched upon several topics. The issue of more stringent gun control regulations remained at the center of the chatter. Students spoke among themselves about the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting while also imagining aloud how they might react if a similar scene played out on their local campuses.Once the march moved out from the commuter lot, the throng slowly headed eastward on Monmouth Street. A select group of student organizers and speakers led the marchers through a series of chants, including “Enough is enough,” “NRA money is blood money,” and “No more AR-15s.”Above the call and response was a sea of cellphone activity, as selfies, snaps and point-of-view videos were posted on social media. It allowed the March For Our Lives movement to live and breathe in real time on various digital platforms – one of the hallmarks of this youth movement which has helped launch and sustain its message.The procession down Monmouth Street was slow moving and came to a halt at Maple Street as police waited to clear and secure the intersection for passing. The march once again came to a stop before turning left onto Broad Street and paused again minutes later at the West Front Street traffic light before turning left and moving toward the end point at Riverside Gardens Park. The trek took nearly 30 minutes to complete.With a calm river behind them and a steady wind at their backs, the student speakers showed no restraint when scolding their federal representatives and community members who don’t support stricter gun legislation.“This is not normal,” said Shea Grant, a 16-year-old from Little Silver who attends Red Bank Regional High School. “We must all refuse to let this become normal. It is when we allow ourselves to become desensitized and indifferent that lawmakers become lenient with policies.”Grant, who is two years away from being able to vote, pleaded for the general public to protect her while she waits her time to cast a ballot.“Be the voice I do not have,” she continued. “Be the voice that was stolen from the 17 in Parkland, for the kids in Newton who were too young to understand politics.”The rally began with a minute of silence for those lost in school shootings, but the rhetoric turned to an attack on the National Rifle Association (NRA) and other special interest groups that protect the Second Amendment.“Now is the time to act. Now is the time to let (politicians) know what we think,” said 18-year-old Rumson-Fair Haven Regional senior Cameron Spector, a Fair Haven resident. “Now is the time to tell them that we do not stand with the NRA, that we don’t want our teachers armed, that we don’t want more guns because more guns do not equal more peace.”Some students also pleaded for more perspective so older generations could understand their growing fears about their safety when attending school.“(Students) should wake up every morning with sound assurance, confident they will go to school and be safe all day,” Cakie Dym, a 13-year-old Oak Hill Academy student from Rumson, asserted. “They should ride the bus and never wonder if the person sitting next to them is carrying a gun.”“I have grown up in a world where children are being shot in their schools,” said Fiona Maguire, a 15-year-old freshman at Middletown South. “I have grown up in a world where I think about the shoes I wear to my school in case I have to run out of it.”A number of elected Democrats spoke directly to the students, reassuring them of their support. Menna, Red Bank’s mayor, suggested the youthful participants petition their municipal governments for support. State Sen. Vin Gopal (D-11) said the NRA should stand with protestors and ensure no more lives are taken by gun violence.U.S. Rep. Frank Pallone Jr. addressed the assembled marchers.U.S. Rep. Frank Pallone (D-6) said he’ll continue to push for “common sense” gun legislation – universal background checks, closures to loopholes from gun shows or internet sales, a ban on assault weapons and “some kind of limitation on the rounds of ammunition.”“We’ve had so many deaths, we’ve had so many mass shootings,” Pallone said. “People are sick and tired of it. Enough is enough.”This article was first published in the March 29-April 5, 2018 print edition of The Two River Times. A peaceful but impassioned crowd marched for gun reform on Broad Street, Red Bank on March 24. Organized by a group called Two Rivers Families March For Our Lives, the demonstration attracted 3,000 people to the downtown area. Photo by Jay CookBy Jay Cook and Chris Rotolo |RED BANK – Generation Z has had enough.They carried colorful signs, howled impassioned chants and shed tears as more than 3,000 demonstrators flooded downtown Red Bank last weekend, calling for widespread changes to federal firearm legislation in response to one of the deadliest school shootings in American history.“We, the students, are your future lawyers, politicians, educators, creators, doctors and more,” said Sofia Casamassa, an 18-year-old Middletown South senior and Middletown resident. “We should lose sleep studying for our tests, not for the fear of our schools being shot up.”Sofia Casamassa spoke at the March for our Lives event in Red Bank on March 24.Casamassa’s speech was one of the many emotional messages passionately delivered on Saturday at Riverside Gardens Park during the final stop of the Two Rivers Families March For Our Lives. Nineteen student activists from a half-dozen Two River-area high schools expressed how special interest groups, the federal government and prior generations have failed to protect them.Red Bank’s march was one of 10 March For Our Lives protests across the state and one of the 700-plus demonstrations held nationally and internationally. Each march was held in memory of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting on Feb. 14 in Parkland, Florida, where 17 students and staff were gunned down inside the school by a former student.Demonstrators first converged in Red Bank around 9 a.m. at the Red Bank train station, a contingent that grew by the minute. The parking lot would have suited the initial estimated draw of 1,500 demonstrators, but the crowd exceeded expectations and spilled over to the auxiliary NJ Transit parking lot adjacent to the Red Bank Armory skating center.last_img read more

Mallards Team of the Week – Junior Dragons Den Regionals

first_imgThe event saw students pitch everything from automotive diagnostic apps to sophisticated branding companies, in a fast paced, fully interactive and entertaining live show format. 2nd place – Vanessa Legge, Joyful Seeds, Selkirk College 3rd place – Laurie Ford, Tyler McCauley, Desirae Robinson, Alex Reaburn, The Roving Gatsby, Selkirk CollegeThe top three in each division now move on to compete for over $6000 in cash prizes at the Kootenay wide Junior Dragons Den championship Saturday, May 6th, 2017 at the Charles Bailey theatre.Mallards Source for sports would like to salute all the competitors with Team of the Week honours. Staff at Mallard’s Source for sports decided to take a bit of a trek outside the sporting venue to the Shambhala Music and Performance Theatre as Students from all over the West Kootenay- Boundary took the stage to compete in the Junior Dragons Den regional championship. Competing in three different divisions, Junior (Grades 8-10), Senior (Grades 11-12) and College/ University, competitors had two minutes to pitch to the judges, following the airing of a short promotional video which had been produced for the competition, highlighting their business or business concept.And the winners were:  Junior division (Grade 8-10) 1st place- Jessica Zwick, Megan Cousins, NIX, Stanley Humphries 2nd place- Cameron Mackintosh, MSDA, Nakusp Secondary 3rd place – Allison Plamondon, Deb Step, Rossland Summits School College/ University Division 1st place- Mitch Roscoe, Ryan Henderson, Creative North Branding, Selkirk Collegelast_img read more