Prepaid card to benefit Demelza Hospice Care for Children

AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Prepaid card to benefit Demelza Hospice Care for Children Tagged with: corporate Finance Howard Lake | 14 April 2009 | News Demelza Hospice Care for Children is to receive income from a new prepaid MasterCard® card from M-Cube and Newcastle Building Society.Prepaid solutions provider M-Cube will donate 100% of its profits from cardholder transactions to directly benefit the hospice. It has also pledged to bear all other suppliers’ costs in order for the charity to benefit as soon as people start using the Demelza Prepaid Card. In addition, Newcastle Building Society, the issuing bank behind the scheme, has waived its usual start up costs associated with setting up a prepaid card.By purchasing the Demelza Prepaid card users can benefit from discounts from a wide array of retailers, leisure centres, theatres and other organisations, cash back rewards on selected purchases, £2,000 worth of days out vouchers, three free magazines, two months of free DVD rentals, and other offers.Prepaid cards are designed to offer a way “to control and manage spending”. The card can be topped up like a mobile phone and used like a debit card, in any outlet where MasterCard is accepted.Kriya Patel, Head of Card Solutions at Newcastle Building Society, said: “As a mutual building society we aim to be a socially responsible organisation, so when M-Cube approached us about the Demelza card we were happy to donate our services and time.”www.demelzaprepaid.com  35 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. read more

One killed, four injured by out-of-control minivan in New York City

first_imgWABC(NEW YORK) — One person was killed and four were injured when a 70-year-old man lost control of a minivan near the Chinatown neighborhood in Manhattan shortly before 7 p.m. Monday.The elderly driver apparently was trying to parallel park on a crowded, rain-slicked street and hit the gas instead of the brake, said police, who intend to bring charges against him including “failure to exercise due care.”The person killed in the accident was a male aged approximately 45 to 55. Police have not released his identity.Two of those injured were last reported to be in critical but stable condition, while the other two were listed as serious but stable. All four were rushed to Bellevue Hospital.The minivan’s driver and two persons in the van refused medical attention, police said.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

AG Curtis Hill Warns Hoosiers To Be Cautious Of Open-Enrollment Scams

first_imgThe open-enrollment period for Medicare coverage in 2020 is Oct. 15, 2019, to Dec. 7, 2019. Attorney General Curtis Hill is warning Hoosiers to take precautions in order to avoid becoming victims of Medicare-related scams.Here are a few tips to avoid scams this open-enrollment season:Government agencies will rarely, if ever, call you. If they do, it will be after they send you a letter – or to return a call you made to them.Anyone who tries to sell you Medicare insurance while claiming to be an “official Medicare agent” is a scammer. There are no Medicare sales representatives.Be vigilant for mailers that appear to be government communications but are actually advertisements for private companies. These documents sometimes will have a disclaimer, but the disclaimer will be in tiny font. Read carefully!The Medicare prescription drug plan (also known as Part D) is voluntary. Ignore anyone who calls saying you must join their prescription plan or you will lose your Medicare coverage.Never give anyone who unexpectedly calls or approaches you information such as your Medicare, bank account, credit card or Social Security number. Scammers can use your information, steal your identity, get credit in your name, and take your money. Anyone who tells you that you must provide personal information to keep your coverage is a scammer.Don’t trust caller ID. Scammers use technology to hide their real numbers and instead show numbers that seem legitimate. So if the caller ID shows a 202 area code or says “government” or “Washington DC,” don’t take that at face value. It could be anyone calling from anywhere.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

NAVSCIATTS Helps Strengthen Partner Nations

first_imgBy Geraldine Cook/Diálogo April 26, 2019 YTUkWV A group of Latin American military special forces listens to a briefing about U.S. Southern Command’s (SOUTHCOM) partnerships in Latin America and the Caribbean. They visited SOUTHCOM in the summer of 2018 as part of an international course for strategic leaders at the Naval Small Craft Instruction and Technical Training School (NAVSCIATTS) at John C. Stennis Space Center, Mississippi. Most of them are high-ranking officers from Colombia, Peru, Guatemala, Mexico, and El Salvador with one common goal: to expand their strategic thinking and planning skills. The school offers the Strategic Leaders International Course (SLIC) in Spanish to advance the strategic thinking and planning capabilities of senior military, civilian, and law enforcement personnel from Latin American and Caribbean partner nations. The four-week in-resident course is aimed at units with a mission to combat terrorism. “It’s a very rewarding experience to be in NAVSCIATTS because it allows us to acquire the skills to solve problems in a strategic way—not only in the short or medium term—to find a solution to the root of the problem,” said Colombian Navy Captain Rodrigo Domingo Rodríguez, commander of the military Unified Action Group for Personal Liberty—known as GAULA—in Tumaco. “It allows us to learn how different government agencies and military forces work jointly with the same goal of finding solutions to the problems our countries face.” NAVSCIATTS operates under U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) in support of geographic combatant commanders’ security cooperation priorities. It trains partner nations’ Special Operations Forces (SOF), SOF-like foreign security forces, and SOF enablers. “We are 100 percent focused on training U.S. partner nations. It’s a very significant asset,” said U.S. Navy Commander John T. Green, commandant of NAVSCIATTS. “We see ourselves as building friendships and partnerships all over the world around the training, but the purpose is no less than to make the world better and safe.” NAVSCIATTS trains at the tactical, operational, and strategic levels to strengthen partner nations’ capabilities across the full spectrum of operations, including small craft operations in riverine or littoral environments. Its curriculum includes courses in small craft strategy, operations, communications, weapons maintenance, and instructor development, among others. “We encourage partner nations to bring complete units to NAVSCIATTS, including commanders, tactical operators, and support personnel,” said Cmdr. Green. “It’s more like mission preparation or unit level training for our partners.” Where the classroom meets the field NAVSCIATTS opened its doors in 1961 at U.S. Naval Station Rodman, Panama, as a U.S. Coast Guard Mobile Training Team (MTT). In 1999 it relocated to Mississippi, where it fulfills its mission to conduct foreign internal defense in support of SOCOM priorities. Through the use of MTTs and in-resident training, the school has trained nearly 12,000 students from 118 partner nations. “Students change how they perceive the world, the future of their country, and their challenges. Central and South America are unique, and many challenges across the region are similar from the security sector, human migration, transnational crime and the illicit traffic of drugs, gangs and people,” said Robert Gusentine, director of SLIC. “We encourage students to think differently. We give them knowledge, tools, and mental models that will enable them to understand and shape their world in new ways.” SLIC is one of 20 formal courses NAVSCIATTS offers annually in English, Spanish, and other languages during five in-resident semesters. As the school’s slogan suggests, “Where the classroom meets the field,” courses are interactive with discussions, tabletop exercises, and practical and experiential learning. In addition to acquiring the skills needed for specific SOF missions, NAVSCIATTS students become part of a global SOF network. “In addition to the knowledge we acquire, we’re learning from other cultures and participating countries’ strategies to confront our problems,” said Capt. Rodríguez. “We have a very special heritage and connection with South and Central America,” added Cmdr. Green. “We are developing the capability to eliminate or at least manage the illicit networks that exists in SOUTHCOM’s area of operations to ensure that they don’t harm the partner nations or the United States.” A group of Latin American military special forces listens to a briefing about U.S. Southern Command’s (SOUTHCOM) partnerships in Latin America and the Caribbean. They visited SOUTHCOM in the summer of 2018 as part of an international course for strategic leaders at the Naval Small Craft Instruction and Technical Training School (NAVSCIATTS) at John C. Stennis Space Center, Mississippi. Most of them are high-ranking officers from Colombia, Peru, Guatemala, Mexico, and El Salvador with one common goal: to expand their strategic thinking and planning skills. The school offers the Strategic Leaders International Course (SLIC) in Spanish to advance the strategic thinking and planning capabilities of senior military, civilian, and law enforcement personnel from Latin American and Caribbean partner nations. The four-week in-resident course is aimed at units with a mission to combat terrorism. “It’s a very rewarding experience to be in NAVSCIATTS because it allows us to acquire the skills to solve problems in a strategic way—not only in the short or medium term—to find a solution to the root of the problem,” said Colombian Navy Captain Rodrigo Domingo Rodríguez, commander of the military Unified Action Group for Personal Liberty—known as GAULA—in Tumaco. “It allows us to learn how different government agencies and military forces work jointly with the same goal of finding solutions to the problems our countries face.” NAVSCIATTS operates under U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) in support of geographic combatant commanders’ security cooperation priorities. It trains partner nations’ Special Operations Forces (SOF), SOF-like foreign security forces, and SOF enablers. “We are 100 percent focused on training U.S. partner nations. It’s a very significant asset,” said U.S. Navy Commander John T. Green, commandant of NAVSCIATTS. “We see ourselves as building friendships and partnerships all over the world around the training, but the purpose is no less than to make the world better and safe.” NAVSCIATTS trains at the tactical, operational, and strategic levels to strengthen partner nations’ capabilities across the full spectrum of operations, including small craft operations in riverine or littoral environments. Its curriculum includes courses in small craft strategy, operations, communications, weapons maintenance, and instructor development, among others. “We encourage partner nations to bring complete units to NAVSCIATTS, including commanders, tactical operators, and support personnel,” said Cmdr. Green. “It’s more like mission preparation or unit level training for our partners.” Where the classroom meets the field NAVSCIATTS opened its doors in 1961 at U.S. Naval Station Rodman, Panama, as a U.S. Coast Guard Mobile Training Team (MTT). In 1999 it relocated to Mississippi, where it fulfills its mission to conduct foreign internal defense in support of SOCOM priorities. Through the use of MTTs and in-resident training, the school has trained nearly 12,000 students from 118 partner nations. “Students change how they perceive the world, the future of their country, and their challenges. Central and South America are unique, and many challenges across the region are similar from the security sector, human migration, transnational crime and the illicit traffic of drugs, gangs and people,” said Robert Gusentine, director of SLIC. “We encourage students to think differently. We give them knowledge, tools, and mental models that will enable them to understand and shape their world in new ways.” SLIC is one of 20 formal courses NAVSCIATTS offers annually in English, Spanish, and other languages during five in-resident semesters. As the school’s slogan suggests, “Where the classroom meets the field,” courses are interactive with discussions, tabletop exercises, and practical and experiential learning. In addition to acquiring the skills needed for specific SOF missions, NAVSCIATTS students become part of a global SOF network. “In addition to the knowledge we acquire, we’re learning from other cultures and participating countries’ strategies to confront our problems,” said Capt. Rodríguez. “We have a very special heritage and connection with South and Central America,” added Cmdr. Green. “We are developing the capability to eliminate or at least manage the illicit networks that exists in SOUTHCOM’s area of operations to ensure that they don’t harm the partner nations or the United States.”last_img read more

Our first conference and in-person client meeting during COVID-19

first_imgIn case you missed it—and you probably did—last week wrapped up the first in-person conference in the country for credit unions during the time of COVID-19. There were many restrictions in place, but at times, a lot of it felt surprisingly normal.It wasn’t great, but that realization gave me some insight: Even as the old normal returns—it still sucks!I’d like to share what I learned from my first COVID-19 conference and in-person client meeting. Plus, I have a couple of quick tips for how to improve your virtual meetings.The New Normal vs the Old NormalI’m not sure why, but it took me a long time to realize I am a raging extrovert. I gain energy the more people I meet, the more meetings I’m in, and the more I speak on stage. I love every minute of it. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

NHP aims high with £124m to raise for expansion

first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img

Extra Innings: Ohtani and Trout make LA Angels successful

first_imgSam Arslanian | Daily TrojanThe Los Angeles Angels are off to their best start since 1979. Touting a 13-3 record in their first 16 games, the team has made a complete 180 compared to their previous two seasons, where the Angels finished 21 games behind the league leader in both 2017 and 2016. I’ve thought a lot about what the special sauce has been for the team in their recipe for success this year. In evaluating their success, there is no way to avoid talking about Halo’s two stars. First and foremost, there is Mike Trout. He has simply been a beast so far, not that he wasn’t a beast before. Trout is the most well-rounded baseball player in the MLB. There is no question about that; he is the definition of the term “five tool.” His batting average (.266) may not completely reflect that right now, but he leads the Angels in homers, RBIs and on-base percentage. But no one man makes a team, and for the first time in a couple years the Angels look like they have that figured out. The Angels hold the best team batting average in the MLB, and are in first place in runs — with the next team nearly 20 runs behind — and they have the third-best fielding percentage. The only team that could hold a candle to the Halos is the Boston Red Sox; hopefully, we will see that matchup in October.In addition to Trout, the Angels have another exciting, yet unconventional star in Shohei Ohtani. It is unprecedented to see a player like him. Madison Bumgarner is the only pitcher that I can think of who drew headlines for hitting performances. The difference is that MadBum hit well for a pitcher, while Ohtani stacks up with the league’s best bats on any given day. Oh, and of course, he’s a solid pitcher.Robert Whiting, the author of several books on Japanese baseball, noted that Ohtani will find success in the MLB because of his unique traits.“It’s hard to top a guy who wins two games and hits three home runs in a week,” Whiting told ESPN. “He is very affable and could well have a long career in American baseball — but most likely as a pitcher.”I do, however, think some of the “Sho-hype” is a bit premature — he’s been in the league for 15 games. There is no reason his signed rookie card should be selling for nearly seven grand at this point. Perhaps, there is another way to look at how Ohtani has benefited the Angels. At 23 years old and coming from the Japanese league, Sho undoubtedly breaks the norm of the Angels — a relatively older team. The level of excitement and freshness Ohtani brings must give the team some sort of spark that has lifted the Angels to such a fantastic start. In recent years, streaky seasons have haunted the Angels. At this point we are only about 10 percent of the way through the 162-game season, so the Angels need to beware of losing skids and injuries. Those unfortunate events are bound to happen — it’s a long season — but the Angels’ success will be defined by how they evade and recover from these downfalls.It’s entirely possible for the Angels to make a run deep into October. It’s a peculiar trend in baseball, because star teams don’t necessarily guarantee rings in Major League Baseball. But the 2018 Angels aren’t the Golden State Warriors nor the 2015 Detroit Tigers. The wealth of talent is different; it’s new, fresh and diverse. Any team that can mix the success of young and old, hitting and pitching and fast and slow will find success in the MLB. Sam Arslanian is a freshman majoring in journalism. He is also the sports editor of the Daily Trojan. His column, “Extra Innings,” runs Mondays.last_img read more

Southbound lanes of I-95 shut down in Boynton due to semi truck accident

first_imgAll southbound lanes of I-95 in Boynton Beach have been shut down due to an accident involving a jackknifed semi truck.The accident occurred near the Gateway Blvd exit Friday afternoon, and is causing southbound traffic to be backed up for several miles.It is unclear what caused the accident or whether any of the involved parties are injured.Crews are currently on the scene working to remove the truck but say it may take some time. Officials are urging drivers who are traveling south on I-95 to exit before Gateway Blvd.last_img read more

The Washington Center for the Performing Arts Hosts “America’s Music” Film…

first_imgSubmitted by The Washington Center for the Performing ArtsThe Washington Center, in downtown Olympia, seats 945 and hosts performances 350 days per year.The Washington Center for the Performing Arts has been awarded a $2,500 grant to host a six-week program series featuring documentary film screenings and scholar-led discussions of twentieth-century American popular music.The Center will host the “America’s Music: A Film History of Our Popular Music from Blues to Bluegrass to Broadway” series to enlighten audiences about uniquely American musical genres including blues and gospel, Broadway, jazz, bluegrass and country, rock n’ roll, mambo, and hip hop. The Center is one of fifty sites nationwide selected to host this program series. “America’s Music” is a project by the Tribeca Film Institute in collaboration with the American Library Association, Tribeca Flashpoint, and the Society for American Music. “America’s Music” has been made possible by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the Human Endeavor.“We are thrilled to participate in this exciting program that will help introduce different types of music, show how modern music has been influenced by older styles, and bridge gaps among generations” said Jill Barnes, Executive Director at The Center.  “The series is made possible by a grant awarded to the Washington Center in partnership with The Evergreen State College and Timberland Regional Library; we are appreciative of the collaborative opportunities this provides.”“America’s Music,” designed for a general audience, will introduce genres of twentieth-century American popular music that are deeply connected to the history, culture, and geography of the United States. Older and younger Americans alike will have the chance to recognize how the cultural landscape that they take for granted today has been influenced by the development of the popular musical forms discussed in this series.The sessions will be held at the Washington Center, 512 Washington St SE, Olympia, on each Friday from April 4 through May 2, and one Saturday, on April 26, during Olympia’s Arts Walk. All programs are from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m.  Andrew (Drew) Buchman, Expressive Arts (Music) faculty member at The Evergreen State College will introduce each film and lead a discussion afterwards.The web page at americasmusic.tribecafilminstitute.org includes additional information on the series as well as scholar essays, suggested readings, discussion points and additional films on the genres. Facebook5Tweet0Pin0last_img read more

Fate of Marine Park Aired

first_imgRED BANK – The public was given its turn to ask questions about the fate of the site of the now unusable clay tennis courts on Union Street next to Marine Park at a special Borough Council meeting May 28. Now the decision about which plan will be chosen will be made by the governing body.The questions and suggestions from the audience of around 120, lasted almost three hours and only ended because the meeting was closed by Councilwoman Linda Schwabenbauer.First up was Rumson resident James P. Cullen, who has offered to donate $500,000 to the town, of which $400,000 would be used to rebuild the clay courts that were damaged by Sandy, and $100,000 to operate and maintain them.The Jetsun Enterprises proposal includes a year round ice skating rink, a miniature golf course, boat rental facilities, a visitors center for the borough and a free electric shuttle that would pick up people throughout the town.The third proposal was presented by Marine Park Activity Center, a local group formed to increase the recreational use of the river by local residents.The plan to save the clay courts presented by Cullen would be free to borough seniors and those up to 17 years old at selected times.“I think you have a unique landmark with a great history,” Cullen said of the courts. He said he would like to see a program that encourages young people in the town to play tennis.The plan sets discounted rates of $150 for unlimited play for borough residents while non-residents would pay $300. Half of the fees would go to the borough.Jeff Podesta spoke in favor of Cullen’s plan and said that playing tennis was an advantage to young people and research had shown that 81 percent of young tennis players had gone on to college.The proposal for retaining the tennis courts said, “A key to the project is retaining Rich Nicoletti who has been keeping the facility running in recent years with essentially no operating budget.”It also said that there be a free, two-week tennis clinic held only for Red Bank residents’ ages 7 to 17.A small committee, the proposal said, would represent the tennis court facility that would oversee it and would present any plans for changes to the Borough Council.“Almost everyone who has grown up playing tennis in the United States has done so on hard courts. However when they first get a chance to play on red clay, they realize it is a very special experience. Our goal here is to give the young people of Red Bank this experience,” the proposal said.The borough would receive 50 percent of moneys raised through fundraising and a yearly tournament the proposal said, which it estimated to raise $50,000 to $60,000.Stephen Hecht said, “I don’t believe we should have a tennis club” at the site. He asked Cullen if he “would be willing to have the town run it?” referring to the courts.“I’m open to that,” Cullen replied.The Jetson plan calls for a “multi-use recreation center” which would have a goal “to get people down to the waterfront, and have a reason to stay there.”It said, “We firmly believe family recreation is the only appropriate use of this valuable asset.”Fees for the activities listed in the plan were $9 for the miniature golf course for adults, with children 12 and under paying $8 and $6 for the ice skating rink with a two-for-one on Tuesdays.Borough residents over 65 and under 4, accompanied by an adult, will have free admission for those activities.Watersport rentals will range from $20 an hour to $80 for eight hours.The Jetson group will pay the borough $75,000 a year rent for the property according to its proposal, with a 25-year lease.Fred Stone questioned the fees and said they might exclude some borough residents from using the facilities. The fees, he said, “might not be trivial,” for some.Questions were also raised about the extra traffic that could be caused by the facility.Some residents who lived near Marine Park expressed concern that the complex would bring late night noise and litter on the streets.Others asked how the town could be assured the venture would succeed, since the partners had not had experience in managing a similar facility.Chris Paseka said he was in favor of the plan since now there was nothing in the town to do with children but “shop and eat.”Others felt differently.“Why would you want to do this to this town?” Shelley Davimos asked. She urged the council to go with the Cullen plan “Take his money, take his money please.”Sandra Talarico, speaking for the Marine Park Activity Center, said the group believed “the town now has a tremendous opportunity to use the riverside property to create a maritime center that expands the recreational opportunities on the river and becomes a focus of recreation education, and commerce for Red Bank.”She described the activities of the Navesink River Rowing group and the Navesink Maritime Heritage Association and said the proposed facility would allow for the expansion of these programs as well as additional ones.Among the activities proposed were adaptive boating, where existing boats are modified for participants who are physically challenged can take part in rowing and sailing programs, rowing, canoeing and small craft sailing as an in-school or after school physical education program, programs for older citizens to keep them active, and rentals that are affordable for kayaks, canoes and paddleboats to allow families and visitors to enjoy the river.In response to questions about a 20,000-square-foot building in the plan, Talarico said it was included because after reading the request for proposals from the town it was thought that the borough was seeking revenues. She said her group was seeking not-for-profit status.Their proposal calls for a 15-year-lease from the borough with terms “based on the gradual implementation of revenue producing programs after five years, and fees based on a percentage of revenue generated by programs and the facility thereafter…”Those who want to comment on the three proposals can do so on the borough’s website where the proposals can be read. They can also be submitted to the Office of the Administrator, 90 Monmouth Street, Red Bank, NJ 07701– By Liz Sheehanlast_img read more