Serving Christ in the world

first_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC By Patrick AugustinePosted Sep 18, 2012 Comments (1) Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Kathleen Murff Whiting says: Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL The Rev. Canon Patrick Augustine[Episcopal News Service] Our hearts are saddened as we watch the violence that has erupted across the world in protest to an anti-Islam film. It has already caused human loss of lives such as Ambassador Chris Stevens and three other Americans serving in the United States consulate in Benghazi, Libya.It reminds me of images of November 1979 of the burning of the U.S. embassy in Islamabad, Pakistan. I was then the rector of St. Thomas Church in Islamabad. I witnessed with my own eyes the rage and destruction caused by thousands of students demanding “death to America.”I also express my protest to this person who made a movie demonstrating scathing attacks on the prophet of Islam. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton has made it clear to the Islamic world with her statement, “This awful internet video that we had nothing to do with.” Enemies of the United States such as al-Qaeda are using it to their advantage to target American presence abroad.America is a land of liberty and millions of immigrants have come to her soil to enjoy many freedoms. At times misguided individuals use their freedom of expression in harmful ways. In 1989, American artist and photographer Andres Serrano, in the name of art, displayed a photograph of a small plastic crucifix she titled “Piss Christ.” This cross was submerged in a glass of the artist’s own urine in a New York museum. This is not only an offensive expression of art but also a terrible abuse of free speech. It appears to be done with malicious intentions to cause hurt and disrespect to the followers of a certain faith community.Equally contemptible were the actions of one individual who made a movie to insult Muhammad. We cannot take these events lightly. As Americans we are not living in isolation from the rest of the global community. If we desire respect we need to earn it by showing respect to others.Free speech doesn’t give license to offend. People of faith must condemn the actions of those individuals who have intentionally hurt the sanctity and harmony of our faith communities. But I fear the repercussions for Christian minorities living in Muslim countries. Many of them already live under the fear of persecution with very little guarantee of basic human rights.I have often wondered what inspired Christians in the Roman Empire who were persecuted and killed for confessing the name of Jesus Christ. In our own modern days of the 21st century we learn of the persecution of Christians in Sudan, Pakistan, Iran, Egypt and many more countries.For the church in Pakistan there is no other option for the faithful followers but to lift up to the hills and behold the cross of Jesus. In the valley of the shadow of death thou art with me. That is their witness as they continue in the face of persecution, discrimination and acts of terror serving that nation through their schools, hospitals, leprosy clinics, schools for the blind and literacy centers.It is on the cross of Jesus the powers of hatred and violence were defeated that meek and weak may have a life of hope and resurrection.What Jesus calls us to do is not always pleasant; it is not always easy; it should not be done without serious contemplation. He wants us to know very clearly what it may cost to follow him. Some of us wonder “Am I worthy to be a disciple of Jesus?” Do I have stamina, perseverance to carry his cross?Martin Luther was right when he said:  “God can carve the rotten wood and ride the lame horse.” Jesus chose just such people: fishermen and tax collectors, known as sinners and zealots. They were not particularly part of the religious establishment. Jesus took these ordinary earthen vessels and filled them with His grace and power to lift high the cross.One thing the Gospel makes clear: “If any want to become my followers, let them deny themselves and take up their cross and follow me.”— The Rev. Canon Patrick Augustine is rector of Christ Episcopal Church in La Crosse, Wisconsin. His e-mail address is [email protected] Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Bath, NC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Job Listing Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA Serving Christ in the world September 18, 2012 at 8:35 pm Dear Rev. Canon Augustine,Your deeply sincere thoughts about this fearful situation should be required reading for all who would report the day-to-day actions across the world in response to this hideous video. I cannot help wondering how we would feel if someone were to profit from a movie which portrayed our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ as a child molester – or worse. What would we think if that person also portrayed himself and his friends as members of some faith the same way the people who have encouraged and blatantly defended this awful film are doing. How close to outrage would the Christian reaction be? Would we “lose it?” And how would we present ourselves to refute such a horrendous item and those who constructed it? Would we communicate with them and pray for them? Would everyone still know we were Christians by our love? I cannot understand the violent protests, the murders, but I can understand the fury that fed them. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Washington, DC Featured Events In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Rector Martinsville, VA Statements and opinions expressed in the articles and communications herein, are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of Episcopal News Service or the Episcopal Church. An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Music Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Collierville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem last_img read more

Rapidísimas

first_img An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Press Release Rector Shreveport, LA Submit an Event Listing Rector Tampa, FL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Bath, NC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Por Onell A. SotoPosted Jun 20, 2013 Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK center_img This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector Columbus, GA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Music Morristown, NJ Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Course Director Jerusalem, Israel La reunión del papa Francisco con el arzobispo de Cantórbery, Justin Welby ha sido comentada muy favorablemente. “Parecía el encuentro de dos viejos amigos”, comentó La Repubblica. El papa Francisco dijo: “Estoy seguro de que esta unión permitirá al mundo católico conocer mejor y apreciar las tradiciones espirituales, litúrgicas y pastorales del patrimonio anglicano”. Y apuntó a que  esta historia “es larga y compleja, no exenta de momentos dolorosos”. Las últimas décadas no obstante  han estado caracterizadas por un camino de cercanía, de aproximación y de fraternidad por el que debemos dar gracias sinceramente a Dios, dijo el papa.El VII Sínodo General de la Iglesia Anglicana de México, en sesión los días 14 y 15 de junio eligió a Francisco Moreno, obispo de la diócesis del Norte de México, como Primado, para servir por un período de seis años.  En este cargo sucede a Carlos Touché-Porter, obispo de la diócesis de México. El nuevo primado estudió en el Seminario de San Andrés, tiene 65 años, está casado y es padres de tres hijos.La diócesis episcopal de Puerto Rico ha anunciado que la fecha de elección de un obispo para suceder a David Álvarez, será el 7 de septiembre y su consagración el 23 de noviembre. Álvarez nació en 1941 y es obispo desde 1987. A diferencia de otras comunidades cristianas en la Iglesia Episcopal la elección de un obispo es de por vida y es realizada por una asamblea de clérigos y laicos “canónicamente residentes de la diócesis”.Para algunas comunidades indígenas de América Latina los linchamientos de personas  que han cometido graves delitos constituyen una costumbre ancestral. El obispo católico romano de Santa Cruz de la Sierra en Bolivia, Sergio Gualberti Calandrina, dijo que es necesario inculcar una cultura que enseñe la sacralidad de la vida para prevenir actos como éstos. En el 2007 el Defensor del Pueblo indicó en esa zona se registraron 57 linchamientos y que la cifra sigue en aumento. Con frecuencia los linchamientos son realizados por una multitud enardecida que castiga o mata sin ningún proceso legal. Además de Bolivia se sabe que en Guatemala han ocurrido actos similares.La Primera Iglesia Presbiteriana de Colorado Springs, Colorado, fundada en 1872 y con una feligresía de 5,000 miembros decidió el domingo 16 de junio abandonar su pertenencia a la denominación presbiteriana nacional, después de 10 meses de discusiones sobre los matrimonios gay. El 90 por ciento de los miembros votó a favor de la decisión de abandonar la denominación. Se cree que otras iglesias seguirán el mismo curso como ha ocurrido en las iglesias episcopales y luteranas.Berta Soler, líder de las Damas de Blanco, grupo pacifista que lucha por un cambio político en Cuba, dijo que espera ampliar la acción de las Damas al resto de la isla. El grupo de unas 70 mujeres se reúne en la Iglesia de Santa Rita en La Habana todos los domingos para participar de la Eucaristía. Soler y una acompañante recibieron a nombre de las Damas el Premio Sájarov que le concedió el Parlamento Europeo en el 2005. Es mejor tarde que nunca, dijo una de las Damas.Ofelia Acevedo y su hija Rosa María Payá, viuda e hija de Oswaldo Payá fundador del Movimiento Cristiano Liberación, desaparecido en un “accidente” vial el año pasado han dicho que su abandono de Cuba es meramente “temporal”. Además, han reafirmado su compromiso por la democratización de la isla y la defensa de las libertades individuales.Después de años de controversias y negativas, los Boy Scouts de América, la organización juvenil más grande del país con 2.7 millones de niños y jóvenes afiliados en más de 100,000 centros en todo el país, decidió permitir la participación de niños gay en sus filas. Al mismo tiempo, seguirá la prohibición para la participación de adultos, sean líderes juveniles o padres de los niños, en las actividades de la organización, si son gays o lesbianas.Hassan Rohani, declarado ganador en las elecciones presidenciales en Irán, es el único clérigo y el único considerado moderado de los seis candidatos que se postularon para suceder a Mahmoud Ahmadinejad. El clérigo reformista obtuvo 18 millones de votos, lo que le otorgó una ventaja de más de 50%, lo suficiente para ganar en la primera vuelta.El martes 11 de junio fue asesinado en Bogotá, Germán Giraldo Orozco quien en años anteriores perteneció al clero de la Iglesia Episcopal en Colombia, era hermano del diácono Edgar Giraldo de la Iglesia Episcopal. Su cadáver fue expuesto en la Catedral Episcopal de San Pablo en Bogotá.VERDAD. “La sangre de los justos no se derrama en vano”, José Martí, 1852-1895, patriota cubano. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rapidísimas Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Events Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC Submit a Job Listing Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest last_img read more

Colombia seeks peace after 50 years of war

first_img Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Featured Events Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC By Clara Villatoro Posted Aug 5, 2016 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Press Release Service Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Music Morristown, NJ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Collierville, TN Rector Albany, NY Comments are closed. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI August 9, 2016 at 9:23 am Let’s not forget the viscous, brutal attacks on Israeli children and adults since 1948 by Palestinians. To attempt to lay this all at the foot of Israel is, at best, disingenuous. There has been more than enough blame to go around. The unfortunate situation is that neither side really wants peace. The Israeli government, and most of its people, believe that after decades of war the Palestinians only want to drive them into the sea and annihilate them. The Palestinians, and much of the Arab world, still teach that Jews are somehow less than human in their “schools”. The present Israeli government continues to build settlements in the West Bank, ignoring agreements to the contrary. And, as long as terrorist organizations are recognized by the Palestinians as legitimate outlets for their frustrations, there will not be peace. Until both sides truly want peace, there will be none. Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Shreveport, LA August 5, 2016 at 7:41 pm Fifty years? Good grief, they’ve probably forgotten what it was all about when this started in the ’60s. But there has been a lot of blood shed; can the government forgive the rebels for this, and ask their forgiveness too? Will it take fifty years to settle things down in Syria too? New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Submit a Press Release Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ [Episcopal News Service] “Peace is not only the silence of guns and bombs; peace is much more than that … . It is rebuilding an entire social fabric that has been torn for more than 50 years. Peace is a fundamental right, and we have to rebuild it to guarantee a decent life [for people],” said Diocese of Colombia Bishop Francisco Duque in an interview with Episcopal News Service regarding the peace process that is developing in his country.The Episcopal Church closely supports the peace process in Colombia. After a half-century of war and years of negotiations, the government and FARC, the Spanish acronym for the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, reached a peace agreement. On June 23, the two parties signed “a definitive agreement to a bilateral ceasefire, to laying down of arms and to guarantees of security.”The agreement is an enormous step toward true peace, according to Duque, who, as head of the Episcopal Church in Colombia, has supported the dialogue process. “We have been very affected by the war; we have communities in conflict zones. But we don’t work just as the Episcopal Church; we work ecumenically with other churches.  The principle of peace is also based on [having] a decent life. There’s a lot of work to do and we will only succeed united as brothers and sisters,” the bishop said.(The Episcopal Diocese of Colombia is one of seven dioceses that make up the Episcopal Church’s ninth province, which covers Central and South America and the Caribbean.)In May, the Episcopal Church agreed at a national convention to support the peace process, offering the government its facilities as “spaces for exercises in reconciliation to succeed in building a sustainable peace.” Colombia President Juan Manuel Santos expressed thanks for the support in an official letter.Pastoral work in the midst of warAlthough the church’s role in the peace process and support for the government was expressed more officially this year, its support for the people and communities has been present throughout the entire conflict, Duque said. The areas most affected by the war are home to four Episcopal parishes, served by two priests and five seminarians.Rev. José Suárez is one of those priests. In 2008, he arrived with his wife and daughter in Palizada and El Bagre – a mountainous zone in northwest Colombia. His predecessor had been retired from the parish following a psychiatric crisis after 15 years of pastoral service. “He was institutionalized for almost a year [and] the church helped him to get a pension afterward. He lived under a lot of pressure and threats. … I agreed to come here because I was ordained for [serving] Jesus Christ and I go wherever they send me,” Suárez said.But he realized in his first days of pastoral work that he would need a great deal of spiritual strength to carry out his job. One day, while he was traveling to a community in a canoe with some parishioners, he came upon a body floating in the middle of the river. His immediate reaction was to retrieve the body, call the authorities, and say a prayer for the deceased. But the reaction of his companions was different.“They told me: ‘Father, don’t touch him. Let’s go. You don’t know what might happen if you take him out of the river. Here it’s better to keep quiet.’ Against all my beliefs, I had to listen to them; I just said a prayer as we continued on our way,” he recalled.The region where Suárez works has many criminal groups. “Here you have to be careful about what you say and who you say it to. It’s almost impossible for a day to go by without someone being killed in the area.”Duque recognizes that Suárez’s pastoral work is a service that requires a lot of courage and commitment. “We can’t give up preaching the Gospel or stop supporting our communities, regardless of the internal conflicts,” he said. “It’s up to us to work, with victims as well as with victimizers, and the church is ready to move forward. We’ve had parishioners massacred and many [others] displaced.”According to data from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, 6.9 million people in Colombia have been displaced due to violence. With the church’s support, Suárez has facilitated the migration of families for security reasons. The result for the families has been good, but the size of the religious community has decreased considerably due to the emigration.“This is a mining area, very rich in metals; there’s a lot of gold extraction. But that doesn’t mean abundance for the people. … For different reasons people end up leaving,” said Suárez, adding that the Episcopal community in El Bagre, which used to have more than 100 people eight years ago, now has only around 50, while in Palizada, the congregation has only about 15.Challenges for rebuilding the countryAfter decades of pain, the announcement of the definitive ceasefire has created many expectations. The Episcopal Church is celebrating the progress, but recognizes that facing the challenges of rebuilding the country and bringing social justice will be an arduous task.The next step is for the population to confirm its support of the peace agreement. On July 18, the Constitutional Court of Colombia upheld the plebiscite that will allow Colombians to support or reject the process.The church is prepared to advocate in the communities for “yes” on the referendum, said Duque.“Not everyone is happy with the announced agreements. Nonetheless, we are supporting this plebiscite that is going to be held; we have offered that support and the government is aware that we (the different churches) have the structures and leaders capable of seeking reconciliation even in places where the state has no presence,” he said.The points to work on, the bishop said, are the indemnification of victims and the pursuit of justice; the rebuilding of the country; and an effort to preserve the historical memory that will prevent the repetition of the atrocities of the war.“We are asking the international community for a lot of prayers, so that all Colombians come out winning, in order that we achieve that peace that we need so badly. And we are also asking for international solidarity; due to the negatives of war, drug trafficking and violence there are very few partnerships with foreign dioceses. We are asking that they accompany us in this process,” said Duque.The church considers the securing of peace to be social and pastoral work. The church already is working with Episcopal Relief and Development to offer micro loans to women heads of household in the conflict zones; these will generate means of earning an income, said the bishop. And Suárez, looking to the future, dares to dream of the type of projects that will bring opportunities for people to get ahead and have a decent life.“There are many needs in health, education and housing. Rebuilding the lives of these people won’t be easy; but with spiritual and material support a lot can be achieved, though it will take many years,” Suárez said.For now, the first step is the plebiscite. Once the government announces the date and publishes the final document of the agreement with the FARC, Colombians will have to vote yes or no on the agreement.– Clara Villatoro is a journalist based in San Salvador, El Salvador. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET center_img Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC August 8, 2016 at 7:40 pm In summary, one could be reminded that this is Palestine–68 years(since 1948) or 50 years(since 1967)! This is still a highly contentious subject where Palestinians in the West Bank, Gaza, Jerusalem(and millions around the world) are still “displaced” persons subsisting in refugee camps and/or subjects occupied by the apartheid Israel government and the brutal Israeli Defense Forces–and still U.S.taxpayers are forced to give Israel $Billions per annum plus highly sophisticated military weaponry for protection and use on defenseless civilians in Gaza(Thousands killed+100’sthousands injured,mostly women/children… All this midst the pseudo”peace/two-state” negotiations and the Palestinians continue to suffer, struggle in perpetuity. Israel forbids UN human rights rapporteur to enter/assess Palestinians basic rights(shelter,water,food)–and throughout this our corrupt congress and political system protects Israel w/impunity for numerous illegal violations! And even our National Episcopal Church leaders(bishops,clergy) remain compromised … Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rich McDonough says: Colombia seeks peace after 50 years of war Government, FARC come to a ceasefire Submit a Job Listing Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit an Event Listing Dr. Erna Lund says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Comments (3) Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Latin America Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Tags Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Bath, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Anthony Price says: Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Advocacy Peace & Justice, The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest last_img read more

Presiding Bishop tells young Episcopalians: ‘We must help America find…

first_img Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Events Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Tags Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Press Release Service Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release Featured Jobs & Calls Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Job Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit an Event Listing Rector Shreveport, LA Presiding Bishop tells young Episcopalians: ‘We must help America find its soul’ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC [Episcopal News Service – Pasadena, California] A Union of Black Episcopalians youth worship service became a call to action July 24 when Presiding Bishop Michael Curry took the pulpit at All Saints Church in Pasadena, California. Youth read lessons and prayers during the service.Curry urged the UBE leaders, youth, several hundred local worshippers and visiting conference-goers to consider, “between now and next year, leading a massive voter registration and education drive and a get-out-the-vote campaign.”Frequently interrupted by applause and shouts of “amen,” he emphasized, “This is not a partisan statement. We can’t tell people how to vote. That’s not right. But we can tell people, ‘You must vote.’“It is a Christian obligation to vote, and more than that, it is the church’s responsibility to help get souls to the polls.”Presiding Bishop Michael Curry preaches at the Youth Praise and Worship Eucharist, held on July 24 at All Saints Church, Pasadena, during the annual meeting and conference of the Union of Black Episcopalians. Photo: Janet Kawamoto/Diocese of Los AngelesCasey Jones, 26, a campus missioner at St. Michael’s University Church in Isla Vista, California, said he had invited a friend to the 7 p.m. worship service, which showcased about 60 youth and young adults attending UBE’s 51st annual conference.It was his friend Chris McCroy’s first visit to an Episcopal church, to which Jones said, “I can’t tell you the pride that I felt in bringing him with me there and hearing what Bishop Curry had to say.“How rich in both the Episcopal tradition and the African American tradition his sermon was, and how he holds both of those things in a way that makes me be myself, and makes me proud to share my church with others.”For McCroy, 25, a UCLA graduate student, Curry’s sermon felt “absolutely phenomenal. I was totally blown away by how beautifully he intertwined our need to be connected through our ancestors.“I took to heart his analogy of our ancestors being like rocks, and how important it is to understand where we’re headed and how to address social justice and the spiritual problems going on in our society and our need to be connected to these rocks, the rocks of our ancestors. I especially appreciated that he’s not trying to be political, that we are dealing with moral issues.”‘Look to the rock’Echoing the conference theme “Preparing the Way for Such a Time as This: Many People, One Lord,” Curry invoked the prophet Isaiah’s advice to draw strength from those who have gone before to create transformation.In a sermon laced with laughter and peppered with applause and “amens,” Curry stepped in and out of the pulpit and engaged worshippers in call and response. He quoted from Isaiah 51, hymns, Harlem Renaissance poet Langston Hughes, jazz singer Billie Holiday, author Alex Haley, and national forefathers Thomas Jefferson and Abraham Lincoln. He even led a rousing chorus of the classic Frank Sinatra song, “That’s Life.”“Isaiah writes, ‘Listen to me, you who pursue righteousness, you that seek the Lord. Look to the rock from whence you were hewn and to the quarry from which you were dug. Look to Abraham your father and to Sarah who bore you,’” Curry said.He continued, “The songwriter said it this way: ‘My hope is built on nothing less than Jesus’ blood and righteousness. I dare not trust the sweetest frame but wholly lean on…’”The congregation responded: “Jesus’ name.”“On who?”“Jesus’ name.”“‘On Christ the solid rock I stand, all other ground is sinking sand,’” Curry added.Repeating the rallying cry of “look to the rock,” Curry recalled the need to persevere and work for future change, even when present hopes seem dashed “on the altar of reality.”“They (the Jewish people) had such hope when they remembered how Moses led them to freedom. They had such hope when Miriam took the tambourine and danced and sang the Lord has triumphed gloriously. The horse and the rider, he has thrown into the sea. They had hopes and then, in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye, about the year 586 B.C. or so, their hopes were dashed. There was an election.”As the congregation laughed and applauded, Curry quipped: “I’m not being political. I’m just being biblical. I’m staying in the Bible.”Weaving the African diaspora experience with the biblical story, he recalled the defeat of Jerusalem by the Babylonians, who exiled and enslaved the Israelites. “They had hope when the Civil War ended and Reconstruction began,” he added. “They had hope, but then Reconstruction ended and there were hooded night riders and Jim Crow was born.”The world for the Jewish people, as for members of the African diaspora, had fallen apart. Curry said, “This was the time James Weldon Johnson (author of “Lift Every Voice and Sing”) said, ‘when hope unborn had died.’”But hope rises afresh. “When times are hard. When the world seems to have gone crazy, ‘look to the rock’ … and find God.”Evoking laughter, he added: “See, the African ancestors understood this. They understood you could be riding high in April and shot down in May. And, if you don’t believe them, Frank Sinatra understood that one.”Curry then led the congregation in singing: “‘I’ve been up and down and over and out and I know one thing. Each time I find myself flat on my face, I pick myself up and get back in the race. That’s life.’”He added: “And, if you don’t believe Frank, ask Jesus. You can ride into Jerusalem on Sunday and be on a cross on Friday. But if you look to the rock, you know Easter’s always coming.”A call to actionYouth sing during a July 24 youth and young adult service held as part of the Union of Black Episcopalians’ 51st annual conference in Pasadena, California. Photo: Janet Kawamoto/Diocese of Los AngelesJesus started a movement, not an institution, Curry said. Jesus charged his followers with the Great Commandment, to “love the lord your God with all your heart and all your soul and with all your mind. Or, as Billie Holiday would say, ‘all of me. Why not take all of me?’”Jesus’ call to love means loving “the neighbor you like and the neighbor you don’t like,” he said. “Democrats, you have to find a Republican neighbor and love that neighbor. Republicans, you have to find a Democrat neighbor. And Independents, you can go either way!”“Because if it’s not about love, it’s not about God … (and) sometimes, when we stray from our true heart and from our true origins, we lose our soul.”Soberly, he added: “I love this country. I love her enough to speak truth.”He then painted a chilling portrait of current realities, including the child-parent separations at the U.S. border, a rise in hate crimes, attacks on places of worship and a recent political rally led by President Donald Trump.Curry said, “Something is fundamentally wrong when crowds chant about a congresswoman, a Somali American, and say to ‘send her home,’ and when the president of the United States says, ‘You need to go back home,’” to four congresswomen of color who have been openly critical of him.“This is not a partisan statement, this is a moral statement,” he said. “Something’s wrong. We must help America, this country we love.”The nation’s core principles – as described in the Declaration of Independence, in Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address, at the Statue of Liberty and in Langston Hughes’ poem “I, Too” – are quintessentially what this country is about, he added.“When we are debating and trying to decide what to do with our borders … ask that green lady with that torch in her hand,” Curry said. “‘Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free.’ That’s America. We must help America find its soul, help America look to its rock.”And when getting “souls to the polls” he added: “Tell them to cast your vote, not on a partisan basis, not based on your biases, but vote your values. Vote the values of human dignity and equality. Vote the values of the rock on which this country was built. Vote.”Curry then spoke directly to the youth, recalling a scene from Alex Haley’s “Roots,” in which enslaved African Kunta Kinte lifts his infant daughter to the night sky and whispers in her ear, “‘Behold the only thing greater than yourself.’”“Lift up your head and behold your God,” Curry said. “You are a baptized follower of Jesus Christ. Follow in his footsteps. Live his teachings. Walk his way of love. Stand up for Jesus. Lift up your head and then face whatever this world presents you with. Walk together, children. Don’t get weary, ’cause there’s a great camp meeting in the Promised Land.”The UBE conference continues through July 26.– The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a Los Angeles-based Episcopal News Service correspondent. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA By Pat McCaughanPosted Jul 25, 2019 Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Tampa, FL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Racial Justice & Reconciliation Rector Collierville, TN Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Hopkinsville, KYlast_img read more

Europe’s Episcopal churches, already isolated by geography, now feel the…

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The usually bustling streets of central Paris, France, are deserted due to the strict lockdown imposed by the government. Photo: Lucinda Laird[Episcopal News Service] Looking at the devastating toll the COVID-19 pandemic is taking on Western Europe, many analysts see a preview of what’s in store for the United States. As of April 2, Western Europe had twice as many COVID-19 cases as the United States and seven times as many deaths, but the pandemic’s trajectory in the U.S. is one to two weeks behind, and the number of confirmed cases is growing faster here.A near-total lockdown has brought much of Europe to a standstill, and that extends to the churches that comprise an often-overlooked branch of The Episcopal Church: the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe. Made up of nine parishes and 12 missions across seven countries, the convocation’s churches are used to being separated from each other, but not from their own parishioners.“They live in a world that’s very different from the world The Episcopal Church arose in and sort of takes for granted. They’re very spread out from each other. We cover the ground from Paris to Tbilisi in Georgia,” the Rt. Rev. Mark Edington, bishop of the convocation, told Episcopal News Service.The priests Edington oversees “have already chosen to willingly go into a part of the church that’s very much on the frontier, on the geographic fringe. It’s living in a culture that is years ahead [of the U.S.] in terms of secularization and multiethnic cultures. They are brave, inventive, creative people, and they are naturally organized around being helpers and community builders, and they’re being locked behind their doors. And it’s really hard.”Edington is experiencing the pain of being separated from his congregations not by a lockdown but by the Atlantic Ocean. Edington, who has served as the convocation’s bishop for a year, was visiting his American “home base” in Massachusetts when he found himself unable to return to Europe because of the travel restrictions enacted by the United States on March 13.The Seine River in Paris, normally crowded with sightseers on the banks and in boats, is empty. Photo: Lucinda Laird“Personally, it’s been very hard because I feel deeply the distance from my people,” Edington told ENS. “I also recognize that, from a practical point of view, I’m able to do more here than I could in Paris. Because at least I can work and move, and in Paris, I would be absolutely locked down in an apartment. Getting back and forth to the cathedral would require a permission slip.”Being stuck in the U.S. means Edington is focusing more on his capacity as a sort of ambassador from the convocation to the rest of The Episcopal Church.“An important part of my ministry is to explain back to the larger church, Why do we have a church in Europe? What does it do? What does it offer our larger church? Who are these people?” Edington said. “The thing I’m able to do now, by the accident of being here, is to be deeply engaged with my colleagues in the leadership of the church … to support the work of the convocation.”And who are “these people”? They’re resourceful, innovative Episcopalians who always find ways to create robust communities despite their isolation from the rest of the church, Edington said.“People in our parishes are largely expatriates. They are not, for the most part, Americans; they’re expatriates from all over the world – from the Anglican world, especially. So they’re pretty plucky. They’re pretty resilient people already,” Edington told ENS. “The thing I am most humbled by, amazed by, is the inventiveness, the creativity, the determination of the congregations of the convocation.”The lockdowns in many European countries are far more stringent than the restrictions currently in place in some parts of the U.S. In Italy and France, for example, no one can leave their homes except for a few approved purposes, like essential work, grocery shopping and medical care, and if they are not carrying a form stating that purpose, they can be stopped by the police and fined.And cultural attitudes toward religion make European Episcopalians’ experiences very different from Americans’ to begin with. While religion remains prevalent in American public and political life and freedom of religion is enshrined in U.S. law, some European countries – France, in particular – have strict legal restrictions on religious expression.“The relationship of the church to the authority of the state is very different in Europe,” Edington said. “If they want to shut us down, they can, and that’s the frightening thing.”In-person worship services and gatherings at all the convocation’s churches have been canceled. Many have moved their worship online, but the closures have taken a toll on the various ministries the churches support. The Joel Nafuma Refugee Center at St. Paul’s Within the Walls Episcopal Church in Rome is “the one that hurts us the most to close,” Edington said.A “very close second” is the meal ministry to homeless people and refugees in Paris. And then there are the meetings of Alcoholics Anonymous and other recovery groups.“In Europe, we’re often the only place in town where there’s an English-speaking AA meeting,” Edington said. “It is hurting people that they have nowhere to meet.”The Very Rev. Lucinda Laird, dean of the American Cathedral of the Holy Trinity in central Paris, lives at the cathedral complex and is hunkering down there with three other people: a youth intern and two interim assistants who are a married couple from the U.S. The four of them are running livestream services and taking care of the property.Delbert Glover checks the mail at the American Cathedral in Paris. Photo: Lucinda Laird“I couldn’t have been luckier in terms of people here,” Laird told ENS. “It’s quite the little community, and we’re really lucky because we have space. … We think of ourselves as a family that’s living together.”The residents of the American Cathedral in Paris (from left, the Rev. Canon Linda Grenz, Delbert Glover, the Very Rev. Lucinda Laird and Cian Grourke) celebrate Morning Prayer, which they livestream on Facebook six days a week. Photo: Lucinda LairdLaird has been trying to take advantage of the few opportunities she has to leave the building. She is allowed to go out for one hour for an approved reason like grocery shopping or exercise, but cannot travel more than about half a mile and must carry identification and the government form, which police will demand to see.“It’s incredibly quiet. I hear birds, which you don’t think about in Paris,” Laird said. “And the Seine is absolutely deserted.”Laird has been contacting parishioners by email and Zoom (including leading a Zoom Bible study), and she and the vestry are setting up a phone tree to call everyone in the directory. The cathedral’s pastoral care committee has a list of elderly and homebound parishioners, who are being contacted. As of March 30, Laird had not heard of any parishioners having COVID-19, although many of their friends and relatives have been infected and some have died.Signs in multiple languages announcing the closure of the American Cathedral in Paris are posted on the cathedral doors. Photo: Lucinda LairdMostly, her parishioners are managing well, Laird said. The ones who aren’t able to get the groceries they need are having them delivered.“It’s more [that they’re] wanting to talk,” Laird said. “There haven’t been, really, any emergencies. … A lot of people are going crazy – shut in and depressed and worried, and maybe they’ve lost their job.”Laird feels fortunate to be in France – not in spite of the strict lockdown measures but because of them.“They were pretty good in France about shutting down pretty quickly, and people [are complying],” she said. “They won’t do that in the States. … I’m really happy to be in Europe, truthfully. I think it’s, in a way, safer right now because they’re much more clear about the lockdown.The sun sets on an empty street in Florence, Italy. Photo: Monica Sharp“On the other hand, they are such a secular society. They are totally uninterested in anything the church wants to do,” she added. While clergy are considered essential workers in some other places, they are not in France.The lockdown has been going on even longer in Italy, home to five of the convocation’s churches. Monica Sharp is the clerk of the vestry at St. James Episcopal Church in Florence, where she has lived since 2016 with her husband and two children, ages five and eight. Because her husband is the director of a university study-abroad program, “we were aware [of the danger] very early on because of the risk management issue for all the study-abroad students,” who were sent home on Feb. 24, she told ENS.“As early as Feb. 14, that weekend, he knew it was coming. … We had a very long lead on this news, to the extent that I felt like Italians weren’t taking me seriously at all. Other expats in town felt like I was exaggerating.”Urging her friends to cancel their social and engagements and prepare for the outbreak, she pointed to the situation that was then unfolding in China and heading their way.As of April 2, almost 14,000 deaths from the virus have been recorded in Italy, which is second to the U.S. in terms of documented infections.“I know people in Italy and in the U.S. who have contracted the virus,” she told ENS. “I have friends of friends who have died. I feel like it’s always nipping at our heels.”Children in Florence have decorated their front doors with homemade signs like this one, which reads, “Everything will be all right” in Italian. Photo: Monica SharpRelatives and friends of some parishioners at St. James have COVID-19, Sharp said. As many other church leaders are doing, Sharp and her fellow vestry members are checking in via phone calls and text messages, especially with people who aren’t doing well, and occasionally delivering groceries to those with health conditions that make them vulnerable to the virus. On top of that, she’s helping record services at St. James.Still, life goes on for Sharp and her family. Her children have been home from school for a month, and she expects the lockdown will continue in some form for “months and months to come.”“I’ve had days where I had abject anxiety, and this week seems to be better. I don’t know why. I’m settling into it. Just you know, keeping the household going, keeping the kids going and doing for ourselves what we need here. You know, trying to just maintain our routine and our stability as best we can.”Editor’s note: An earlier version of this story mistakenly said that some of St. James’ parishioners have COVID-19; that has not been confirmed.– Egan Millard is an assistant editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Bath, NC Health & Healthcare This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Music Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Belleville, IL By Egan MillardPosted Apr 3, 2020 Press Release Service Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA center_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC COVID-19, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Events Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Tags Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Europe’s Episcopal churches, already isolated by geography, now feel the isolation of strict lockdowns Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

Citizen scientists will search English, Welsh churchyards for rare or…

first_img Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Citizen scientists will search English, Welsh churchyards for rare or endangered species Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Press Release Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ Church of England, Submit an Event Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Tags Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Youth Minister Lorton, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Collierville, TN Environment & Climate Change Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Bath, NC Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Posted Jun 4, 2021 Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA [Church of England] Hundreds of churches have signed up for a week-long nature count beginning this weekend that will encourage people to visit churchyards and record what they see.Churches Count on Nature, running June 5-13, is a citizen science event covering churchyards across England and Wales. The project will see communities and visitors making a note of the animals, birds, insects or fungi in their local churchyards. Their data will then be collated on the National Biodiversity Network.One church getting involved is St. Pol de Léon’s Church in Paul, Cornwall. As part of its nature count, the church will mark Environment Sunday and will hold its morning service outside in its Celtic quiet garden.Read the entire article here. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT last_img read more

Man vs. Tree: Fear isn’t a bad thing

first_img You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here December 14, 2016 at 11:22 am Inspiration: Charles TowneSplendid, I enjoy Mr. Towne’s look on life. I climbed that tree, or at least one like it. Made me feel like I was Queen, I could see forever. That is, until I started down. I climbed a lot of trees in my childhood but never again that one. Thank you Mr. Towne for showing a window into my childhood and what we all go through to get where we are. I will look forward to reading more.Sincerely, L. Atwell TAGSCharles TowneFearInspirationTrees Previous articleBeautiful weather, large crowds highlight Apopka Christmas ParadeNext articleA Gift that Keeps on Giving Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 3 COMMENTS Lorita Atwell Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Trees are still a passion of mine but at 82 I do a tad better with my feet on the ground. Thanks lots, Chaz Charles Towne Anonymous Please enter your comment!center_img Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Reply Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Reply December 12, 2016 at 10:25 am December 11, 2016 at 5:01 pm Please enter your name here Reply I do so enjoy Charles Towne’s articles! They are so down to earth and practical,full of faith and love to God and fellow men and women. Seems to have a great love of mom, America and apple pie, especially mom’s. Please continue these articles from Charles Towne. They are so inspirational. Thanks again for this type of interesting articles! InspirationBy Charles TowneThe hounds of knowledge always send the lions of fear running.I like that idea.I have had enough animal encounters, not just a few of which were enough to raise the hackles of fear on my scrawny little neck. I was no bigger than a wart on a toad’s behind when I climbed a tree the first time. It was one of those strange moments in life when curiosity overruled common sense, and soon, quite mysteriously, I found myself Waaay up there.Now “Waaay up there is not a bad place to be until you look down. I looked down. “Yikes, how did I get Waaay up here? What if I fall! What if I break my arm, my leg, my neck? Boy, I am going to get a good switching if I break my neck.” I’m sure I originated the term, “tree hugger.” I’m also sure I left little boy nail prints in the skin of that tree.Charles Towne is a longtime Apopka resident, member of Insp!re Church and a published author.Scared? Me scared? I wasn’t scared, Terrified maybe, but not scared.I knew that some time way in the future they would find a little fossilized boy wearing a fear induced grimace, way up there in that tree. And speaking of starving to death it must be getting close to dinnertime!Oh dear God, I was going to miss dinner, and mama had baked an apple pie! My fear of missing out on the apple pie was incentive enough. Inch by inch I worked myself closer and closer to the ground, until…? I never knew standing on the ground could feel so good!And then I broke my toe when I kicked the tree.I went home and was in plenty of time for dinner, and in spite of the fact that my toe hurt like blazes I ate a big piece of apple pie, and do you know what? I went back the next day and climbed that tree again, and I went through the same agony, the same fear, all over again.   Eventually I learned to love that old tree. By God’s grace, as we face our fears they become much less threatening, and just perhaps they even add spice to our lives. Boy, do I miss mama’s apple pie.Live fully,Love openly,And make a difference, today LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replylast_img read more

Hello summer break!

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter May 27, 2018 at 4:52 am TAGSDon LindseyInspiration Previous articleMoving Time?Next articleThe forgotten history of Memorial Day Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR How fortunate you are Don. You are so very rich yet in family and in a grand potential for joy. Blessings on you and yours, Chaz UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 charles towne InspirationBy Don LindseyIn August of last year, I wrote a column saying goodbye to a great summer break that my family and I had experienced.  With my kids having their last day on Wednesday, I find myself looking forward to what this year has to offer.  While we have no set plans outside of visiting my mother in law in Fort Pierce, I am looking forward to what I enjoyed most about last year.Spending time with my family and watching my kids grow up.I didn’t realize last summer just what I was watching until I sat back when they went back to school and thought about all the things we did as a family and how spending that time with the children showed me just how much they had grown.  This school year has seen them become even more and not only from a physical standpoint even though our middle son is just as tall as I am now and will be shooting past that soon I am guessing, but they have grown emotionally as well.  The latter has helped them break out of their shell in my opinion, and I’m starting to see more of their personalities emerge.For my daughter Emma, that means that she stepped out of her comfort zone this school year and started to do things that she may have been hesitant to do before such as performing in her school’s talent show. I, unfortunately, couldn’t see that, but when I picked her up from school that day, a couple of the teachers were gushing about how beautiful she was singing.  The night before, she was so nervous, and I sat with her for a while reassuring her that she’d be fine and would do an excellent job.  I had no idea how right I would be, and I was so proud of her just seeing how happy and confident she was from that performance.  For her, she has a full summer planned.  Camp in a couple of weeks, hanging out with friends and partaking in whatever we do as a family should keep her busy and I cannot wait to see how far she’s come once the summer is over.My middle son Kyle has plans as well, and it’s been great seeing how far he’s come this year.  His grades were a concern early, but he stepped it up big time and finished the year very well.  I’ve already mentioned how tall he is getting, but he’s also growing in maturity.  For him, this summer is full of possibilities. He’s not into camp anymore but at 15 years old is starting to catch the working bug and is looking to earn some money of his own so that he can buy some of the things he wants.  I am also seeing him take more of an interest in what’s going on around the world as he and I have had intense discussions about the current political and social climates in this country alone right now. These are fascinating conversations for me because he is the one going to school every day with the fear and knowledge of all the mass school shootings we’ve seen.  As a parent, I worry, but I think that I got so caught up in my fear that I underestimated how scary it must be knowing that these types of tragedies happen everywhere.  I’ve watched this kid grow up so much in the last six years and to see him continue to be the inquisitive, good-hearted soul that he is while starting to embrace the idea of hard work outside of the home environment is a beautiful thing to see.Last but never least is our oldest son Jesse.  This guy has always amazed me as I’ve mentioned in past columns by overcoming autism and excelling in everything that he puts his mind to.  It’s hard to believe that the little guy I met when he was ten will be a junior heading into next school year.  I’ve been impressed and proud of how he has stepped out of his comfort zone like his sister and is doing things that I never dreamed he would.  He took musical theater this year and enjoyed going to the plays and helping.  As I see him continue to grow, my pride for who he’s turning into is growing with him. I cannot wait to see what the future holds for this kind-hearted, and talented young man.The main thing I am going to focus on this summer break is not missing the moments when they happen and only thinking about them after the summer is over.  I want to catch them as they happen and enjoy every moment I have with my kids because after all, childhood is a lot like summer, here one day and then gone before you know it.  Happy Memorial Day weekend and God bless. You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here 2 COMMENTS Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Reply Reply Please enter your comment! Don Lindsey is a follower of Christ, son, husband, father, and a survivor.  Originally from Dayton Ohio, and resident of Apopka for six years, Don sees his life as a dedication to his wife, parents, children, and community. May 27, 2018 at 10:13 am LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Don Lindsey Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Indeed. My biggest lesson has been slowing down enough to take it all in. God has blessed me with so much and I don’t want to miss anything because I am too focused on what’s in front of me.Thanks for the comment Chuck and God bless!-D.L Please enter your name herelast_img read more

A Friday Night Ride-Along in Apopka

first_imgShare on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Observations from an Apopka Police Department patrol shift.*****“Please take care of my Dad.”  Those were the words spoken to me by Apopka Police Captain Randy Fernandez’s 9-year old son, Asa.Fernandez and I had been planning an evening ride-along for some time.  When we agreed earlier in the week to do it on Friday July 9th, neither of us had any idea that we would be patrolling Apopka less than 24 hours after the Dallas police shooting that saw five officers killed and 6 others wounded.Was I a bit apprehensive?  Absolutely.  But how often would this opportunity present itself? I was determined to not allow a terrorist act change my plans.As our “shift” began we spoke with a young women who had brought her three young children to hand-deliver cards of appreciation to the Apopka Police Department.  Officer Danielle Saslo gave them a quick tour and let the oldest turn on her patrol car’s lights.From 4:30 PM to 12:30 AM we roamed the streets of Apopka.  We responded to a few of the incidents reported by or assigned by Dispatch to one of the 8 patrol officers on duty.But our first encounter was with a driver who made an illegal left turn onto Main Street.  Within a minute of pulling the driver over we were joined by another patrol officer.  I quickly learned that was the protocol.  At least two officers responded to nearly every call for service.  Does it really take two officers to issue a traffic violation?  Well, no, as long as the driver answers the officer’s questions and complies with the officer’s requests.More about that later…Gone are the days when there are two officers in each patrol car.  It is much more efficient to have one officer per car.  But, in the interest of officer safety other officers will respond as backup. The backups leave only when it is clear that officer safety will not be compromised.The Stops:Illegal left hand turnTwo car accident without injuries in front of the VFWSpeeding violation on 441 west of SheelerMedical emergency involving a homeless man at the Main Street Walgreen’s.  Apopka paramedics took the man to Florida Hospital Apopka.  Officer Charlie White transported the man’s worldly goods to the same destination in his APD pickup.  Officer White also updated me regarding a strangely parked car reported in my neighborhood a month ago.Domestic dispute between two ex’sWe stopped by the Communications Center where Lead Communications Technician Billy Bryant briefed me on the technology and the challenges the dispatchers face during their long shifts.It was a fairly typical Friday night, according to 29-year veteran Sergeant Carlos Joseph.  Towards the end of the shift he and I spoke at length. While briefing his shift earlier he told his officers they needed to put the events in Dallas “out of their heads” and focus on their job; Protecting and serving the people of Apopka.  He emphasized the word “serving.”“We are in the service business,” said Carlos. “Yes, we protect, but every contact we make is also a service call.”The Apopka Police Department responds to over 1,000 “calls for service” every week, according to the Department’s weekly activity report.Joseph told me about two traffic stops he had made in the hours after the Dallas police shootings.  At one a 17-year old girl thanked him for his service and asked him to be safe.  At the other three young women told him they were praying for him and the other Apopka police officers.The final stop of the night involved a driver who ran a stop sign.  Rather than pull over, he proceeded to drive to his house where he then refused to provide Officer Ashley Eller with an ID.  He also refused to get out of his car when asked.  He and his female passenger insisted that he had done nothing wrong. As time went on the volume of their objections increased.I was observing this conflict from about 40 feet away, but the increasing tension was obvious.  As I looked around I realized that the street was totally dark except for the lights from the patrol cars.  Surely there were people in these houses watching.  My thoughts went to Dallas.  Because of the situation, there were several officers on the scene.  What if…?In the end the driver was extracted from the vehicle, handcuffed, and placed in the backseat of a patrol car.  He ultimately produced his ID and was released.*****When Asa asked me to take care of his Dad my reply was, “I’ll do my best.”A better response to Asa and all of the children of police officers is this; “Thank you for allowing your Moms and Dads to keep me and the rest of Apopka safe.” Previous articleSinners in the Hands of an Angry God by Jonathan EdwardsNext articleTrack Club Car Wash a Success Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR The Anatomy of Fear Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply Please enter your name here Please enter your comment! Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Surviving the hundred-year flood

first_img Mama Mia God showed us that He was watching over us!InspirationBy Charles TowneFlood!There isn’t anything quite as destructive as a flood unless it is fire, and to be honest with you I believe I would prefer the fire.“Why in the world would you say that?” You might ask. Well, let me explain.A fire destroys completely, but a flood soaks everything with mud and corruption the like you can’t imagine. Trying to clean up after a flood is an exercise in futility. Furniture and clothing? Forget it. You might just as well burn it all.   Back in the 40’s my family and I experienced what was called a “hundred-year flood” which as the name denotes, as measured by severity and damage, only happens once every hundred years. We had muddy river water three feet deep in our home.A friend rescued our chickens and kept them in his garage until things returned back to somewhat normal. Our boat was swept away leaving us stranded until a neighbor nosed the front of his motorboat in the front door and we all climbed aboard, to stay with friends until the river returned to its pre-flood level. Mama put anything she treasured, such as the photo albums, the family bible, and her knick-knacks up as high in the kitchen cabinets as she could, where they survived for the most part.Daisy, our little Jersey cow? Well, what could we do other than watch as she struck out, bawling her lungs out, across the raging, angry flood waters? We watched her go under and turned away. Nothing could survive that torrent. The water finally crested, and that night it started to recede.Three days later we returned to our soaked homestead.   Mama wept when she saw the stinking mess. She only cried for awhile, though, and then she set us all to work. Life has taught me that one of the best cures for grief is to get your butt into gear and go to work! We dragged the soggy mattresses out to be discarded. I dare say we carried about a zillion buckets of water from the river to wash the mud from the house. The chickens were returned to their coop where the took up the daily life of being brain-dead chickens again as though nothing had happened.Three days after we returned to our home one of the younger kids came running into the house shouting, “Mama, Mama, Daisy’s back, she isn’t drownded, she come home!” And sure enough, Daisy had not “drownded,” she had come home, bawling for want of missing being milked for those days. Such is the way of life. We all have troubles, but if we are faithful, God will see us through the tumult and turmoil of this life. Your family’s cow was a Jersey named Daisy. That is so sweet! Our family cow was a Holstein that I named Twinkie because she was black and white like a Twinkie. Cows don’t drown too easily. I know they can swim, because when I went out into the St. Johns River down around Brevard Co., there were cows swimming way out in the river, with just their heads out of the water, and I am telling you, that sure surprised me when I was out there riding around in a boat. That was the last thing I expected to see out there. Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Please enter your comment! Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. TAGSCharles TowneInspiration Previous articleHabitat bringing 58 new homes to South ApopkaNext articleShift your vision from earth to the heavens Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Reply LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here February 25, 2017 at 10:29 pm 1 COMMENT The Anatomy of Fear Live simply,Love generously,Trust God, and make a difference, today.Charles Towne is a longtime Apopka resident, member of Insp!re Church and a published author. Please enter your name herelast_img read more