Europe’s Episcopal churches, already isolated by geography, now feel the…

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID The usually bustling streets of central Paris, France, are deserted due to the strict lockdown imposed by the government. Photo: Lucinda Laird[Episcopal News Service] Looking at the devastating toll the COVID-19 pandemic is taking on Western Europe, many analysts see a preview of what’s in store for the United States. As of April 2, Western Europe had twice as many COVID-19 cases as the United States and seven times as many deaths, but the pandemic’s trajectory in the U.S. is one to two weeks behind, and the number of confirmed cases is growing faster here.A near-total lockdown has brought much of Europe to a standstill, and that extends to the churches that comprise an often-overlooked branch of The Episcopal Church: the Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe. Made up of nine parishes and 12 missions across seven countries, the convocation’s churches are used to being separated from each other, but not from their own parishioners.“They live in a world that’s very different from the world The Episcopal Church arose in and sort of takes for granted. They’re very spread out from each other. We cover the ground from Paris to Tbilisi in Georgia,” the Rt. Rev. Mark Edington, bishop of the convocation, told Episcopal News Service.The priests Edington oversees “have already chosen to willingly go into a part of the church that’s very much on the frontier, on the geographic fringe. It’s living in a culture that is years ahead [of the U.S.] in terms of secularization and multiethnic cultures. They are brave, inventive, creative people, and they are naturally organized around being helpers and community builders, and they’re being locked behind their doors. And it’s really hard.”Edington is experiencing the pain of being separated from his congregations not by a lockdown but by the Atlantic Ocean. Edington, who has served as the convocation’s bishop for a year, was visiting his American “home base” in Massachusetts when he found himself unable to return to Europe because of the travel restrictions enacted by the United States on March 13.The Seine River in Paris, normally crowded with sightseers on the banks and in boats, is empty. Photo: Lucinda Laird“Personally, it’s been very hard because I feel deeply the distance from my people,” Edington told ENS. “I also recognize that, from a practical point of view, I’m able to do more here than I could in Paris. Because at least I can work and move, and in Paris, I would be absolutely locked down in an apartment. Getting back and forth to the cathedral would require a permission slip.”Being stuck in the U.S. means Edington is focusing more on his capacity as a sort of ambassador from the convocation to the rest of The Episcopal Church.“An important part of my ministry is to explain back to the larger church, Why do we have a church in Europe? What does it do? What does it offer our larger church? Who are these people?” Edington said. “The thing I’m able to do now, by the accident of being here, is to be deeply engaged with my colleagues in the leadership of the church … to support the work of the convocation.”And who are “these people”? They’re resourceful, innovative Episcopalians who always find ways to create robust communities despite their isolation from the rest of the church, Edington said.“People in our parishes are largely expatriates. They are not, for the most part, Americans; they’re expatriates from all over the world – from the Anglican world, especially. So they’re pretty plucky. They’re pretty resilient people already,” Edington told ENS. “The thing I am most humbled by, amazed by, is the inventiveness, the creativity, the determination of the congregations of the convocation.”The lockdowns in many European countries are far more stringent than the restrictions currently in place in some parts of the U.S. In Italy and France, for example, no one can leave their homes except for a few approved purposes, like essential work, grocery shopping and medical care, and if they are not carrying a form stating that purpose, they can be stopped by the police and fined.And cultural attitudes toward religion make European Episcopalians’ experiences very different from Americans’ to begin with. While religion remains prevalent in American public and political life and freedom of religion is enshrined in U.S. law, some European countries – France, in particular – have strict legal restrictions on religious expression.“The relationship of the church to the authority of the state is very different in Europe,” Edington said. “If they want to shut us down, they can, and that’s the frightening thing.”In-person worship services and gatherings at all the convocation’s churches have been canceled. Many have moved their worship online, but the closures have taken a toll on the various ministries the churches support. The Joel Nafuma Refugee Center at St. Paul’s Within the Walls Episcopal Church in Rome is “the one that hurts us the most to close,” Edington said.A “very close second” is the meal ministry to homeless people and refugees in Paris. And then there are the meetings of Alcoholics Anonymous and other recovery groups.“In Europe, we’re often the only place in town where there’s an English-speaking AA meeting,” Edington said. “It is hurting people that they have nowhere to meet.”The Very Rev. Lucinda Laird, dean of the American Cathedral of the Holy Trinity in central Paris, lives at the cathedral complex and is hunkering down there with three other people: a youth intern and two interim assistants who are a married couple from the U.S. The four of them are running livestream services and taking care of the property.Delbert Glover checks the mail at the American Cathedral in Paris. Photo: Lucinda Laird“I couldn’t have been luckier in terms of people here,” Laird told ENS. “It’s quite the little community, and we’re really lucky because we have space. … We think of ourselves as a family that’s living together.”The residents of the American Cathedral in Paris (from left, the Rev. Canon Linda Grenz, Delbert Glover, the Very Rev. Lucinda Laird and Cian Grourke) celebrate Morning Prayer, which they livestream on Facebook six days a week. Photo: Lucinda LairdLaird has been trying to take advantage of the few opportunities she has to leave the building. She is allowed to go out for one hour for an approved reason like grocery shopping or exercise, but cannot travel more than about half a mile and must carry identification and the government form, which police will demand to see.“It’s incredibly quiet. I hear birds, which you don’t think about in Paris,” Laird said. “And the Seine is absolutely deserted.”Laird has been contacting parishioners by email and Zoom (including leading a Zoom Bible study), and she and the vestry are setting up a phone tree to call everyone in the directory. The cathedral’s pastoral care committee has a list of elderly and homebound parishioners, who are being contacted. As of March 30, Laird had not heard of any parishioners having COVID-19, although many of their friends and relatives have been infected and some have died.Signs in multiple languages announcing the closure of the American Cathedral in Paris are posted on the cathedral doors. Photo: Lucinda LairdMostly, her parishioners are managing well, Laird said. The ones who aren’t able to get the groceries they need are having them delivered.“It’s more [that they’re] wanting to talk,” Laird said. “There haven’t been, really, any emergencies. … A lot of people are going crazy – shut in and depressed and worried, and maybe they’ve lost their job.”Laird feels fortunate to be in France – not in spite of the strict lockdown measures but because of them.“They were pretty good in France about shutting down pretty quickly, and people [are complying],” she said. “They won’t do that in the States. … I’m really happy to be in Europe, truthfully. I think it’s, in a way, safer right now because they’re much more clear about the lockdown.The sun sets on an empty street in Florence, Italy. Photo: Monica Sharp“On the other hand, they are such a secular society. They are totally uninterested in anything the church wants to do,” she added. While clergy are considered essential workers in some other places, they are not in France.The lockdown has been going on even longer in Italy, home to five of the convocation’s churches. Monica Sharp is the clerk of the vestry at St. James Episcopal Church in Florence, where she has lived since 2016 with her husband and two children, ages five and eight. Because her husband is the director of a university study-abroad program, “we were aware [of the danger] very early on because of the risk management issue for all the study-abroad students,” who were sent home on Feb. 24, she told ENS.“As early as Feb. 14, that weekend, he knew it was coming. … We had a very long lead on this news, to the extent that I felt like Italians weren’t taking me seriously at all. Other expats in town felt like I was exaggerating.”Urging her friends to cancel their social and engagements and prepare for the outbreak, she pointed to the situation that was then unfolding in China and heading their way.As of April 2, almost 14,000 deaths from the virus have been recorded in Italy, which is second to the U.S. in terms of documented infections.“I know people in Italy and in the U.S. who have contracted the virus,” she told ENS. “I have friends of friends who have died. I feel like it’s always nipping at our heels.”Children in Florence have decorated their front doors with homemade signs like this one, which reads, “Everything will be all right” in Italian. Photo: Monica SharpRelatives and friends of some parishioners at St. James have COVID-19, Sharp said. As many other church leaders are doing, Sharp and her fellow vestry members are checking in via phone calls and text messages, especially with people who aren’t doing well, and occasionally delivering groceries to those with health conditions that make them vulnerable to the virus. On top of that, she’s helping record services at St. James.Still, life goes on for Sharp and her family. Her children have been home from school for a month, and she expects the lockdown will continue in some form for “months and months to come.”“I’ve had days where I had abject anxiety, and this week seems to be better. I don’t know why. I’m settling into it. Just you know, keeping the household going, keeping the kids going and doing for ourselves what we need here. You know, trying to just maintain our routine and our stability as best we can.”Editor’s note: An earlier version of this story mistakenly said that some of St. James’ parishioners have COVID-19; that has not been confirmed.– Egan Millard is an assistant editor and reporter for Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Bath, NC Health & Healthcare This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Music Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Belleville, IL By Egan MillardPosted Apr 3, 2020 Press Release Service Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Tampa, FL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA center_img Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Smithfield, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC COVID-19, Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Featured Events Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Tags Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Press Release Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Europe’s Episcopal churches, already isolated by geography, now feel the isolation of strict lockdowns Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Job Listing Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

Citizen scientists will search English, Welsh churchyards for rare or…

first_img Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Citizen scientists will search English, Welsh churchyards for rare or endangered species Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Press Release Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ Church of England, Submit an Event Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Tags Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Youth Minister Lorton, VA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Collierville, TN Environment & Climate Change Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Bath, NC Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican Communion, Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Posted Jun 4, 2021 Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Job Listing Rector Knoxville, TN Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA [Church of England] Hundreds of churches have signed up for a week-long nature count beginning this weekend that will encourage people to visit churchyards and record what they see.Churches Count on Nature, running June 5-13, is a citizen science event covering churchyards across England and Wales. The project will see communities and visitors making a note of the animals, birds, insects or fungi in their local churchyards. Their data will then be collated on the National Biodiversity Network.One church getting involved is St. Pol de Léon’s Church in Paul, Cornwall. As part of its nature count, the church will mark Environment Sunday and will hold its morning service outside in its Celtic quiet garden.Read the entire article here. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT last_img read more

Surviving the hundred-year flood

first_img Mama Mia God showed us that He was watching over us!InspirationBy Charles TowneFlood!There isn’t anything quite as destructive as a flood unless it is fire, and to be honest with you I believe I would prefer the fire.“Why in the world would you say that?” You might ask. Well, let me explain.A fire destroys completely, but a flood soaks everything with mud and corruption the like you can’t imagine. Trying to clean up after a flood is an exercise in futility. Furniture and clothing? Forget it. You might just as well burn it all.   Back in the 40’s my family and I experienced what was called a “hundred-year flood” which as the name denotes, as measured by severity and damage, only happens once every hundred years. We had muddy river water three feet deep in our home.A friend rescued our chickens and kept them in his garage until things returned back to somewhat normal. Our boat was swept away leaving us stranded until a neighbor nosed the front of his motorboat in the front door and we all climbed aboard, to stay with friends until the river returned to its pre-flood level. Mama put anything she treasured, such as the photo albums, the family bible, and her knick-knacks up as high in the kitchen cabinets as she could, where they survived for the most part.Daisy, our little Jersey cow? Well, what could we do other than watch as she struck out, bawling her lungs out, across the raging, angry flood waters? We watched her go under and turned away. Nothing could survive that torrent. The water finally crested, and that night it started to recede.Three days later we returned to our soaked homestead.   Mama wept when she saw the stinking mess. She only cried for awhile, though, and then she set us all to work. Life has taught me that one of the best cures for grief is to get your butt into gear and go to work! We dragged the soggy mattresses out to be discarded. I dare say we carried about a zillion buckets of water from the river to wash the mud from the house. The chickens were returned to their coop where the took up the daily life of being brain-dead chickens again as though nothing had happened.Three days after we returned to our home one of the younger kids came running into the house shouting, “Mama, Mama, Daisy’s back, she isn’t drownded, she come home!” And sure enough, Daisy had not “drownded,” she had come home, bawling for want of missing being milked for those days. Such is the way of life. We all have troubles, but if we are faithful, God will see us through the tumult and turmoil of this life. Your family’s cow was a Jersey named Daisy. That is so sweet! Our family cow was a Holstein that I named Twinkie because she was black and white like a Twinkie. Cows don’t drown too easily. I know they can swim, because when I went out into the St. Johns River down around Brevard Co., there were cows swimming way out in the river, with just their heads out of the water, and I am telling you, that sure surprised me when I was out there riding around in a boat. That was the last thing I expected to see out there. Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 Please enter your comment! Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. TAGSCharles TowneInspiration Previous articleHabitat bringing 58 new homes to South ApopkaNext articleShift your vision from earth to the heavens Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Reply LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here February 25, 2017 at 10:29 pm 1 COMMENT The Anatomy of Fear Live simply,Love generously,Trust God, and make a difference, today.Charles Towne is a longtime Apopka resident, member of Insp!re Church and a published author. Please enter your name herelast_img read more

Picture the Homeless honored for 20 years of organizing for housing as a human right

first_imgPicture the Homeless celebrated the 20th anniversary of its founding by sponsoring a fundraising program on Nov. 25 in Harlem, N.Y.   PTH has been in the forefront of advocating — through direct action, marches, rallies, research and legislation — for the right of the homeless to decent housing, as opposed to relying on shelters as an alternative.  PTH was founded on Nov. 16, 1999, by two homeless men, Anthony Williams and Lewis Haggins, who were living in Bellevue Men’s Shelter. Williams received the Founder’s Award and gave a heartfelt thanks during the ceremony. The inscription on the award reads: “For your Vision, Courage & Belief Those Human Beings without Housing Can Organize & Speak for Themselves.”  Other awards were given to longtime PTH organizers Jean Rice, recipient of a lifetime award, as well as Nikita Price, DeBoRah Dickinson, William Burnett, Rachel Brumfeld and Sam J. Miller.  Before each organizer received their award, their recorded oral testimony on how PTH changed their life was played.Part of the program description of PTH states: “PTH has forever changed how homeless people are pictured by our fellow New Yorkers.  As a result, Picture the Homeless has organized to win public policies in the areas of policing, housing, land use and the shelter system.  Don’t Talk About Us: Talk with Us!”  For more information, go to picturethehomeless.org.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

Government urged to lift censorship and guarantee journalists’ safety

first_img Follow the news on Bangladesh Bangladeshi writer and blogger dies in detention RSF_en Help by sharing this information February 26, 2021 Find out more May 19, 2021 Find out more Bangladeshi reporter fatally shot by ruling party activists News to go further BangladeshAsia – Pacific Newscenter_img News BangladeshAsia – Pacific Reporters Without Borders today called on the interim government and army to quickly rescind all the repressive measures of recent days, during which the imposition of a curfew from 22 August until yesterday severely impacted the ability of journalists to work.”The interim government’s record has been badly marred by the censorship and violence that has assailed the press since the start of the student protests in Dhaka and other major cities,” the press freedom organisation said.”We note law and information adviser Mainul Hosein’s meeting with media executives on 27 August, and the interior minister’s apologies for the many acts of violence against journalists,” Reporters Without Borders added. “The government should now, as a matter of urgency, heed the media’s requests for more freedom and for guarantees of security for journalists.”The army took to the streets to enforce the curfew that was imposed from 22 August until yesterday following major demonstrations in Dhaka University. The population was forced to stay at home and mobile phone services were interrupted for several days.The government has been trying to impose censorship and self-censorship on the media since the start of the pro-democracy demonstrations. Hosein, the government’s law and information adviser, urged the media several times not to exaggerate the protests. When the TV stations stopped showing footage of the demonstrations on the evening of 22 August, Hosein told the media that the government did not want to “impose censorship.”The curfew made it impossible for journalists to work. The security forces refused to treat a press card as a laissez-passer although the government news agency, BSS, had said journalists with press cards would be able to move freely. Dozens of journalists were attacked by policemen or soldiers and the publication of newspapers was badly disrupted.Anis Alamgir, head of news of privately-owned Baishakhi TV, was beaten by soldiers on the evening of 22 August, a few hours after the curfew went into effect. He collapsed, injured, in the street and was taken to a Dhaka police station before being released. “I was above all shocked to find myself being beaten by an officer in uniform,” he told Reporters Without Borders.Nesar Uddin Ahmed of the daily newspaper Amar Desh was attacked by members of an elite police unit as he was returning to his home in the capital. A photographer with the daily Dinkal was badly injured by members of the security forces and had to hospitalized. One newspaper, Samakal, reported that 14 of its journalists were beaten by soldiers or police.At least 15 journalists were arrested by the police for curfew violations on 22 August alone. Most of them were released on bail. Reporters Without Borders is currently trying to establish whether any journalists and media workers are still detained.The government’s Press Information Department reiterated on 23 August that press cards would be treated as curfew passes. But in practice, journalists were unable to resume working freely until the curfew was lifted, first partially and then totally.Governmental censorship concentrated on the TV stations. CSB TV and Ekushey TV received a Press Information Department order on 23 August not to broadcast “provocative” reports and comments. Employees of several TV stations told Reporters Without Borders that military intelligence officers called the stations to threaten them with prosecution on various charges including violating of the section 5 of the State of Emergency Regulations, for broadcasting critical reports or eye witness accounts of the demonstrations. The TV stations also had to suspend all their political programmes.”The ban on talk shows is a big trouble,” an ATN Bangla head of news said. Journalist Monjurul Ahsan Bulbul said: “As parliament is not there, television talk shows about politics and society are the best way for the people to comment on official decisions.” News Organisation Receive email alerts RSF calls for the release of Bangladeshi journalist Rozina Islam, unfairly accused of espionage February 22, 2021 Find out more August 29, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Government urged to lift censorship and guarantee journalists’ safetylast_img read more

New views on Limerick’s revolutionary past

first_imgNewsHeritageNew views on Limerick’s revolutionary pastBy Staff Reporter – August 1, 2018 3626 Previous articleLotsa luck for Limerick familyNext article#PHOTOS All-Ireland glory beckons for Limerick’s magnificent hurlers Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie Print Limerick Post Show | Is fearr Gaeilge bhriste ná Béarla cliste Advertisement Facebook Linkedin New Report from MIC Reveals the Reality of Human Trafficking in Ireland WhatsApp Limerick’s Student Radio Station Wired FM Celebrates 25 Years on Air center_img Twitter TAGSheritagehistoryLimerick City and CountyMary Immaculate College Housing 37 Compulsory Purchase Orders issued as council takes action on derelict sites Is fearr Gaeilge bhriste ná Béarla cliste RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Free State soldiers outside Cruise’s Royal Hotel in 1922.Photo: National Library of Ireland.OVER the next five years, Ireland will commemorate the centenaries of seminal, but often difficult and controversial, events.As part of the commemorations, the Department of History at Mary Immaculate College (MIC) will host a free one-day conference on Limerick during the revolutionary years between 1918 and 1923.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The conference, ‘Limerick 1918-23: New Approaches’ will bring together leading scholars to better understand this important period in Limerick’s and, indeed, the country’s history on Saturday, September 1.According to event organiser and MIC history lecturer Dr Brian Hughes, the conference participants have been working with new themes, methodologies, and sources for history and commemoration of the Irish Revolution.“The research that will be presented reflects some the most recent and innovative additions to our knowledge of the revolutionary period in Limerick and further afield. Contributors will use local, national, and even international perspectives to help us better understand the events of 100 years ago.’The first session of the conference will bring highlight underused or neglected sources for social and political history of the period.Limerick Council Archivist Jacqui Hayes and Limerick Diocesan Archivist David Bracken will highlight material available in local archives that represent the upheaval of the period alongside the everyday lives of those who lived in the city and county.MIC history student, Winnie Davern, will use a collection of private family papers to highlight personal responses to the anti-conscription movement in 1918 while PhD graduate, Dr Seán William Gannon, will look at the experiences of disbanded members of the Royal Irish Constabulary in Limerick in 1922.Maynooth PhD candidate Jack Kavanagh will make innovative use of GIS mapping technology to provide a more detailed picture of Civil War participation and Dr Alexandra Tierney will reflect on the impact of suffrage and independence on the women of Limerick.In the final session, papers by Anna Lively from the University of Edinburgh and Síobhra Aiken from NUI Galway will examine the ways that those involved wrote about their experiences afterwards, in both memoirs and in novels, and how events like the Limerick Soviet have been remembered or, indeed, forgotten.Queen’s University Belfast Professor Fearghal McGarry’s keynote lecture will ask us to think about the history and commemoration of Ireland’s revolution in a global context.Full details at www.mic.ieby Tom [email protected] Week-long Celebration of Women as MIC Marks International Women’s Day Emaillast_img read more

Over-pricing increases time-to-sell by 26 days, says Rightmove

first_imgSellers are twice as likely to find a buyer if they have an offer accepted on the first listed asking price, according to new property market research by Rightmove.Its study of 300,000 newly-listed homes found that if a property is correctly priced, the average time to find a buyer is 21 days – but a lengthier 47 days if the price has to come down.The study tracked properties that were first put up for sale between 13th May and 31st July, with a cut-off date of 10th September for any reductions or sales activity. Of the properties that weren’t reduced, 63% of them had been marked under offer or sold subject to contract, while of those that had at least one reduction, only 32% were marked under offer or sold.Property marketIt reports that one in six properties (16%) have been reduced since May, slightly down from 18% for the same period last year, while the average price drop is 5% – down from 5.2% in 2019 – equating to almost £16,000 based on the national average asking price of £319,497.Rightmove’s director of property data, Tim Bannister (left), says it proves just how vital it is for sellers to listen to agents when it comes to asking prices.He adds: “If sellers are serious about selling, then starting with too high an asking price can cause unnecessary delays, and also make it a lot less likely they will actually find a buyer in the end.“The temporary stamp duty holiday means more sellers are in a hurry to get a sale through conveyancing, and with this also taking longer at the minute, a realistic asking price could soon end up being the difference between completing in time or losing out on the savings.”Read more about the boom market.Tim Bannister. Rightmove average ‘time to sell’ September 17, 2020Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » Housing Market » Over-pricing increases time-to-sell by 26 days, says Rightmove previous nextHousing MarketOver-pricing increases time-to-sell by 26 days, says RightmoveRightmove claims the current feverish property market means first offers are likely to be the best, assuming they are correctly priced.Nigel Lewis17th September 202001,407 Viewslast_img read more

Oxford come from behind to crush tired Cambridge

first_imgOxford beat Cambridge 22-25 18-25 25-12 25-22 15-7Oxford’s volleyball team went from hell to heaven last Wednesday as they turned around what was looking like a straight humiliation at Iffley Road. As the canon-like booming of the two sides’ spikes died down, however, the Blues were left victorious by three sets to two, leaving Cambridge to ponder how they let slip a two set lead. Throughout the match, Oxford were the classier side. Led by captain Jack Turner and giant spikers Greg Dochuk and Anders Karup, they had too much power and skill for the Tabs when they got their plays right. Early on, however, they rarely did. No matter how tall your spikers are, nor how acrobatic your captain, they are of little use if you serve into the net, or misread your team-mates’ set ups. The Blues had suffered some injury enforced changes, but their play was too inaccurate to be excused by this, as even experienced combinations misfired. despite the solidity of some of the Cambridge play, they were largely gifted the first two sets by Oxford, 22-25 and 18-25. At this point, the Blues’ supporters were getting nervous. The Volleyball club has organised itself to ensure women players always attend men’s matches, and vice versa, and the results were impressive: a dozen or so knowledgeable, fanatic and incredibly vocal supporters, cheering every Oxford play, even when supposedly acting as line judges. Back on the court, some choice words must have been exchanged in the Oxford huddle, for they came out a different side. Rather than gift Cambridge an early lead through needless errors, they tightened up their play to move into a comfortable lead. Despite one Cambridge timeout after another, Oxford’s lead soon grew from 7-4 to 16-9. Aided by a dig by libero denis Zuev from almost six feet outside the court, Oxford closed out the set 25-10. The fourth set was to follow. To their credit, the Tabs raised their game, but the set turned with a series of seven successive winning deliveries from Jeff Young, including an ace. Though Dan Maranhao was arguably lucky to get away with a yellow card after ‘verbalising the referee’, the Tabs never recovered from Young’s winning series, losing the set 25-22. In the fifth, tie breaker set, the Tabs’ heads finally went down. Oxford raced to a 6-0 lead, and by the time the Tabs got into the set, Oxford had it, 15-7. Turner, commenting on the win, said “We came out very slowly, and we took a lot of time getting our heads in. But we were always much more aggressive, we just needed to play simple volleyball and not get carried away. It’s only our second game, so it was just a question of getting match fit and in practice.”ARCHIVE: 5th week MT 2005last_img read more

“IS IT TRUE” DECEMBER 13, 2018

first_imgFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare We understand that sometimes people don’t always agree and discussions may become a little heated.  The use of offensive language, insults against commenters will not be tolerated and will be removed from our site. Any comments posted in this column do not represent the views or opinions of the City-County Observer or our advertisers.center_img We hope that today’s “READERS FORUM” will provoke honest and open dialogue concerning issues that we, as responsible citizens of this community, need to address in a rational and responsible way? IS IT TRUE that Republican Tim O’ Brien just announced his candidacy for a position on the Evansville City Council in Ward #1?  …he is currently serving as the Southwest Indiana Association of Realtors President-Elect and will serve as the 2019 President? …he is employed by the same real estate company (FC TUCKER/EMGE) that employs current City Council members, Missy Mosby, and Jonathon Weaver?IS IT TRUE we are told that a well known conservative Democrat from a highly respected political family is considering throwing his name in the hat to run for the 1st Ward seat?  …if he does Republican Tim O’Brien will have one heck of a political dogfight on his hands?IS IT TRUE we are expecting that Missy Mosby and D’Angelo Tayor will officially announce that they will be running against each other in the Democrat primary?  …this race should really turn out something to watch?  … whoever wins the primary battle better be ready to face an excellent Republican candidate named Natalie Rascher in the General election?IS IT TRUE we are told that Democrat Zach Heronemus will be running against Republican Gabriel John Hayden, CPA in the 3rd Ward?  …we expect that Mr. Heronemus will attack Mr. Hayden for spearheading the effort to give ECHO Housing around $500,000 of taxpayers while the results of the forensic Audit and EPD criminal investigation haven’t been made public?  …also have been told that Hayden will be drilled on why he allowed the ‘Jacobsville Join In’ group to abruptly close without finding out the reason why?  …this group was located in the 3rd Ward and was funded by the DMD and supervised by the officials of ECHO Housing?IS IT TRUE it looks like Alex Burton is poised to replace retiring 4th Ward City Councilwoman Connie Robinson?  …that the 4th Ward is considered to be a safe seat for the Democrats?IS IT TRUE that 6th Ward Democratic Councilman Jim Brinkmeyer should be re-elected to City Council?  …are told that Mr. Brinkmeyer will have token Republican opposition in the General election?IS IT TRUE we predict that Democrats Jonathan Weaver, Ed Bassemier, Amy Word-Smith, and Kristin Holt Burkhardt will be competing for the three (3) At-Large seats on City Council? …we expect that Republicans candidates Ron Beane, Michelle Mercer, and Alex Smith will run extremely competitive races against the Democrats?IS IT TRUE that Democratic City Clerk Laura Windhorst will run unopposed in the primary?  … we expect her to have token opposition in the General election?IS IT TRUE we also predict that 5th Ward Councilman Justin Elpers will run for re-election as an unopposed candidate in the Primary and the General election?IS IT TRUE it looks like the chances of Mayor Winnecke being re-elected to a third term are very good?IS IT TRUE we expect that the Republicans will go do everything in their power to take control of City Hall?IS IT TRUE  we been told that the Vanderburgh County Republican Party Chairman Wayne Parke recently filed a petition with the State GOP to remove Deputy Mayor Steve Schaefer as a Precinct Committeemen in the 1st Ward?  …we are told that the rationale for Mr. Parke’s action against Deputy Mayor Steve Schaefer was that he publicly supported the City Council attorneys wife when she ran as a Democrat for a seat on the Newburgh City Council? …we are told that Mr. Parkes petition was declared dormant because Mr. Schaefer moved from that Ward?IS IT TRUE  we wonder if the Warrick County GOP Party Chairman filed a petition to remove  Josh Clayborn as a Warrick County precinct officer after he openly supported his wife who ran as a  Democrat for the Newburgh City Council?IS IT TRUE that by 2021 when only a few miles of water pipes are replaced, the water rates will have increased by 118% in only 5 years?…the new pipes alone are causing a 48% increase in the next 3 years?…if you like that just bend over and prepare for this to happen 66 more times with just the water pipe replacement program?…while the CCO is supportive of and an advocate for these updates, we are very concerned that the people who live in Evansville will be run out of town by the costs associated with doing them?Todays“Readers Poll” question is: Do you think the voters will elect three individuals from the same business to serve on the Evansville City Council?If you would like to advertise on the CCO please contact us at City-County [email protected]“Readers Poll” question is: Do you think its appropriate for three individuals from the same business to run for a seat on the Evansville City Council?If you would like to advertise on the CCO please contact us at City-County [email protected]: City-County Observer Comment Policy. Be kind to people. No personal attacks or harassment will not be tolerated and shall be removed from our site.last_img read more

Planning ahead

first_imgSunday 27 June, Melton Big BakeAs part of the Melton Mowbray Country Fair, the organisers are inviting bakers to enter the Big Bake competition. Entries are invited from bakers working in bakeries, restaurants, pubs, supermarkets and cafés, although there will also be a separate home bakers category. Judging will be on appearance taste and ingredients used. The organisers say they are supporting the Real Bread Campaign and will give special recognition to breads baked without artificial additives and using great ingredients. Categories include white wheat bread, brown wheat bread, wholemeal bread, sourdough bread, non-wheat bread, speciality bread, small savoury baked goods and best decorated cake, among others.www.leicestershirefoodlinks.org.uklast_img read more