Where Google Misses the Mark for Premium Publishers

first_imgI love Google. I believe it to be one of the greatest American businesses ever launched. For the last dozen years, I have been a partner as well as competitor to Google. I have seen firsthand the incredible breadth of engineering talent and resources they bring to the market. As a publisher, I was a long-time customer of syndicated Google search advertising as well as embedded, contextual text advertising.Google is brilliant at serving and monetizing text advertising. Whether done on the search result page or via contextual mapping to page level content into a dedicated module, these are solutions that no publisher can directly offer. These are solutions based on mapping scale of advertisers to scale of potential keywords, something no individual publisher can possibly replicate. The money generated from these placements is incremental and does not compete with the publishers’ own direct efforts to sell a similar product.Display is a different ballgame. A premium publisher’s core business is in selling a high-value display placement into their curated environment at a premium price. While programmatic buying is surely challenging the value of this model, it still represents a significant market with hundreds of top-tier brand marketers placing value on the age-old premise of the right ad delivered to the right individual in the right environment. Google’s core display product undercuts this model in damaging ways. Google will serve what its algorithm perceives to be the best possible ad at that given moment. It does not discern the appropriateness of the ad content itself or the economics involved. This often defaults to the lowest common denominator served into a premium display position—a text ad, from a direct response marketer, sold for less than 10 percent of what the publishers’ direct sales force is trying (and succeeding ) to get for that same inventory.This is particularly damaging in emerging areas like mobile. Because most premium publishers don’t sell their mobile inventory yet, you often see Google text ads appearing in prime display mobile real estate. Because many of these publishers are using DFP as their first party ad server, Google wisely makes it very easy for them to automate their Adsense backfill.Here is the prime example. This is a screen shot of The New York Times mobile home page from a few months back. The NYT has not sold this position so it defaults to a backfill solution from Google. This is what served: Now I’m an old digital guy and still view the home page of the NYT as a very premium buy. I see top 50 brands paying top dollar to get that position. Google has done a great service to the Counseling Anxiety in Miami advertiser. I wonder if they even know they owned the homepage of the NYT. For the NYT, this is a horrible result. Never mind the poor quality of the ad content and how that sullies the environment for the reader; I’m not sure how their sales team can go to market selling the exclusivity of the placement to their top-brand advertising partners when this is what’s running there.So what can you do if you’re a premium publisher with lots of unsold inventory?1. Put the right resources in place to sell it yourself, and in the way it needs to be sold—as a high-value, high-impact display unit.2. Work with specialist networks that focus on premium inventory and premium brands.3. If you’re going to backfill, do it via an SSP (Pubmatic, Rubicon, or even AdMeld, which Google owns), where more competition for the inventory should produce better ads and better economics.4. If you’re going to just run Google ads, then have somebody at the switch watching to make sure there are minimum standards of ad content quality and yield.Don’t get me wrong; Google is a great and critical partner to the publisher and would be the first to point out they give the publisher control to manage their inventory. The reality is that most publishers don’t have the resources to do this, so they default to something that in the long run undermines their business.    Be smart. Protect the premium value of your brand and inventory.last_img read more

WILMINGTON AROUND THE WEB The Best Stories From Wilmingtons Newspapers

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below are recent articles about Wilmington — published online between July 22, 2018 to July 29, 2018 — that residents should consider reading:Wilmington Town CrierVietnam Memorial Moving Wall program by Lizzy HillLibrary hosts local authors’ book launch event by Sheryl WalshNational Grid lockout affects Wilmington workers by Lizzie McDermottWilmington Town Crier sports stories can be read HERE.Wilmington AdvocateNoneWilmington PatchNoneLowell Sun‘This is healing for me’ (Moving Wall) by Kori TuittHis main event: Leading cancer fight by Kori TuittLike Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com. Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedWILMINGTON AROUND THE WEB: The Best Stories From Wilmington’s NewspapersIn “Community”WILMINGTON AROUND THE WEB: The Best Stories From Wilmington’s NewspapersIn “Community”WILMINGTON AROUND THE WEB: The Best Stories From Wilmington’s NewspapersIn “Community”last_img read more

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT Wilmingtons Joshua Buske Named To Deans List At University Of Hartford

first_imgWEST HARTFORD, CT — The University of Hartford is pleased to announce Joshua Buske, of Wilmington, has been named to its Dean’s List for Fall 2018.Spread across seven dynamic schools and colleges, the University of Hartford has been guiding the purpose and passion of students for over six decades. On our 350-acre campus alongside Connecticut’s capital city, approximately 5,000 undergraduate and 1,800 graduate students from 48 states and 46 countries come together for a common purpose: to collaborate across different disciplines, diversify perspectives, and broaden worldviews. We’re a four-year private university focused on advancing the public good through meaningful connections within our communities. Our unique approach to comprehensive education gives us the critical perspectives that lead to impactful change, regionally and beyond. With degree programs spanning the arts, humanities, business, engineering and technology, education, and health professions, we focus on doing the work that matters.(NOTE: The above announcement is from the University of Hartford via Merit.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSTUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Wilmington’s Joshua Buske Named To Dean’s List At University Of HartfordIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Wilmington’s Joshua Buske Named To Dean’s List At University of HartfordIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Wilmington’s Joshua Buske Named To Dean’s List At University Of HartfordIn “Education”last_img read more

CHAMBER CORNER Learn About Wilmingtons Partners In Rehab Physical Therapy

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — The Wilmington-Tewksbury Chamber of Commerce profiles a different member in the local media each week.  In this week’s “Chamber Corner,” the Chamber is spotlighting Partners In Rehab Physical Therapy, located on Concord Street in Wilmington.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedPHOTOS: Wilmington-Tewksbury Chamber Of Commerce Welcomes Partners In Rehab PT To WilmingtonIn “Business”CHAMBER CORNER: Meet Assunta Perez Of DaMore LawIn “Business”CHAMBER CORNER: Learn About Align Credit Union’s Student AccountsIn “Business”last_img read more

Nissan exchairman Carlos Ghosn formally charged in financial misconduct case

first_imgCarlos Ghosn, Chairman of NissanNissanTokyo prosecutors on Monday indicted former Nissan Motor chairman Carlos Ghosn for under-reporting his earnings over five years leading to March 2015 and issued an arrest warrant for additional charges.Ghosn, 64, was arrested in Tokyo on November 19 for allegedly failing to report 5 billion yen ($44 million) of his salary to the authorities, reports Efe news.Ghosn, whose detention period was to end on Monday, has also been issued with an arrest warrant for further charges, according to the prosecutors’ documents.Nissan was also indicted in the case, with documents saying that the company had also committed irregularities in its financial statements.Former Nissan Representative Director Greg Kelly was also indicted for conspiring with Ghosn and has been re-arrested.According to one of the documents, between 2011 and 2015, Ghosn reported half of what was agreed with Nissan. However, discrepancies over the three subsequent years are much greater.Ghosn remains the chairman and CEO of Renault, which has an alliance with Nissan.He was removed from the Mitsubishi chairman post, the third company in the two-decade-long alliance.According to the reports, the payment amount not declared by Ghosn was part of compensation he was to receive after leaving the company.last_img read more

Make nutrition campaign interesting to youths

first_imgParticipants pose for a photograph at a roundtable on nutrition at CA Bhaban in Karwan Bazar on Wednesday. Photo: Prothom AloPromoting nutrition education among youths through innovative campaign is essential to fight malnutrition problem of young generation, experts told a roundtable on Wednesday.Prothom Alo in association with Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) of United Nations organised the roundtable titled ‘Nutritious World: Young Generation’s Engagement’ at CA Bhaban in the city’s Karwan Bazar area.Nutrition experts also observed that most of the people of the country lack nutrition literacy which hinders their growth and wellbeing.Most of the youths take junk food and skip breakfast endangering their physical condition, discussants said.Food ministry’s planning and monitoring unit (FPMU) director general M Badrul Arefin said that innovative campaigns such as printing nutrition related advertisement in the cover of text book can be helpful to spread awareness on nutrition.He also said that the government is working to ensure good governance in the nutrition sector.Director general of Bangladesh National Nutrition Council (BNNC) Shah Newaz urged youths to maintain a balanced lifestyle.FAO’s governance policy advisor Naser Farid urged the stakeholders to ensure an environment where youth can develop nutrition entrepreneurship.Bangladesh Institute of ICT in Development’s (BIID) chief executive officer (CEO) Shahid Uddin Akbar said the idea of Nutrition Clubs in educational institutions has contributed to build awareness and disseminate knowledge on nutrition among the students.He said Nutrition Clubs should be set up in more educational institutions of remote areas. Senior nutritionist of Meeting the Undernutrition Challenge (MUCH) project Lalita Bhattacharjee said, “We need to spread our nutrition messages to the adolescent in a very interesting way so that we can convince them to take more nutritious food instead of junk food.”Member of Bangladesh Agricultural University’s Nutrition Club Ruhul Amin, general secretary of College of Home Economics’ Nutrition Club Zerin Tasnim, president of Maple Leaf International School Nutrition Club Misha Ahsan shared their experience of running Nutrition Clubs in their respective educational institutions.Chief technical advisor of MUCH project Naoki Minamiguchi, technical director of Helen Keller International’s National Information Platform for Nutrition Jillian L Waid and Save the Children’s SUCHANA programme chief of party Sheikh Shahed Rahman also spoke at the roundtable moderated by Prothom Alo associate editor Abdul Quayym.last_img read more

Pressley Officially Massachusetts 1st Black Congresswoman

first_imgBy WILLIAM J. KOLE, Associated PressBOSTON (AP) — Ayanna Pressley didn’t campaign to make history, but she did on Tuesday, officially becoming Massachusetts’ first Black woman elected to the U.S. House of Representatives.The Democrat sailed through the general election unopposed, two months after unseating 10-term Rep. Michael Capuano in a national political stunner in the state primary.In this Oct. 1, 2018 file photo, Boston City Councilor Ayanna Pressley speaks at a rally at City Hall in Boston. On Nov. 6, Pressley became Massachusetts’ first black woman elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. (AP Photo/Mary Schwalm, File)“Activists and agitators have brought us to this very moment,” Pressley told cheering supporters Tuesday night. “None of us ran to make history. We ran to make change … and change is on the way.”“Can a congresswoman wear her hair in braids? Rock a black leather jacket?” she added — and the crowd roared.With no Republican in the race in the heavily Democratic district, her September upset victory had all but assured Pressley the keys to the office, with only the remote possibility of a write-in campaign to potentially stop her. That unlikely scenario behind her, she’ll now represent the 7th Congressional District — the first in Massachusetts where minorities make up a majority of the voting population.“It is hard to believe that in the 230-year history of our delegation, there’s never been a person of color,” she said on “Matter of Fact with Soledad O’Brien.”(Although that’s true of the House, Republican Sen. Edward Brooke of Massachusetts, who took office in 1967, was the first Black politician to be elected by popular vote after the 17th Amendment was ratified in 1913.)Pressley, 44, is also the first African-American to serve on the Boston City Council.Endorsed last month by former President Barack Obama, she got a big early boost from fellow congressional upstart Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who similarly knocked off veteran Rep. Joe Crowley of New York in June.Both rode a rising wave of pro-woman sentiment to Washington as the party embraced diversity and liberal politics as the recipe for success in the Trump era.“With her victory tonight, Ayanna Pressley has not only made history as the first Black woman ever elected to represent Massachusetts in the U.S. House of Representatives, she’s ensured that Democrats have the voice of a young, Black progressive woman helping lead the fight for inclusive populist reforms,” the political action committee Democracy for America said Tuesday night in a statement.In the run-up to the midterms, Pressley held off on saying where she stands on Nancy Pelosi, the Democrats’ embattled House leader.From the outset, Pressley made clear that she meant serious business, telling voters before she sent Capuano packing that she viewed the race as “a fight for the soul of our party and the future of our democracy.”The district includes a wide swath of Boston and about half of Cambridge, as well as portions of neighboring Chelsea, Everett, Randolph, Somerville and Milton. It includes the neighborhood of Roxbury, the traditional center of Boston’s Black community.Ideologically, Capuano was much like Pressley: liberal, a self-described progressive. But the White, middle-aged incumbent didn’t look like many voters in his district, even though Pressley herself had bristled at the notion that race was a defining issue in the contest.She flashed that defiance during a debate, saying: “I happen to be Black and a woman and unapologetically proud to be both, but that is not the totality of my identity.”But Pressley also made clear the importance of diversity in the nation’s halls of power.“I do think that our democracy is strengthened by an engagement of new and different voices,” she told college newspaper editors in Boston in October.___For AP’s complete coverage of the U.S. midterm elections: http://apne.ws/APPoliticslast_img read more

Which came first the head or the brain

first_img(Phys.org) —A fundamental question in the evolution of animal body plans, is where did the head come from? In animals with a clear axis of right-left symmetry, the bilaterians, the head is where the brain is, at the anterior pole of the body. Little is known about the possible ancestor of bilaterians. Fortunately their sister group from that same progenitor, the cnidarians, can be studied in parallel today to give some clues. Cnidarians are creatures like jellyfish, hydra, and sea anemone which possess rudimentary nerve nets, but no clear brain. They all have just a single orifice to the external world, which basically does it all. In a recent paper published in PLOS Biology, researchers from the University of Bergen in Norway compared gene expression patterns in sea anemone (Nematostella vectensis, Nv) with that from a variety of bilaterian animals. They found that the head-forming region of bilaterians is actually derived from the aboral, the opposite-oral, side of the ancestral body plan. Pioneering developmental biologist Lewis Wolpert, is often credited with having observed: “It is not birth, marriage, or death, but gastrulation which is truly the most important time in your life.” Almost all animals undergo a similar gastrulation process early in their development. The point where the cells first invaginate during gastrulation, the blastopore, uniquely defines an embryonic axis. After this stage however, all bets are off—attempts to define phyla according to hardline criteria, like blastopore = anus, are invariably met by counterexample where it instead becomes the mouth. Gene expression, while not always constrained into single contiguous areas, therefore provides a baggage-free way to assign homology across species.Wolpert’s concept of positional information in development has been largely vindicated by the discovery of hox gene codes in a wide variety of animals. While hox genes are the critical regulators of axial patterning, in most bilaterians they are not expressed in the anterior head-forming region. The researchers focused instead on the genes six3 and FoxQ2, transcription factors which have been shown to regulate anterior-posterior development. Six3 knockouts in mice, for example, fail to develop a forebrain. In humans six3 regulates forebrain and eye development.Sea anemone, like Nematosella, are curious creatures. As larvae they swim about with their aboral pole forward. As adults they plunge this region into the sea floor, and permanently anchor themselves in. Their bodies then undergo various changes but their oral pole remains intact for feeding. By using knockdown and rescue experiments in Nemostella, the researchers were able to show that six3 is required for the development of the aboral region, and the expression of further regulatory genes. This suggests that the region distal from the cnidarian mouth parallels development of the bilaterian head. The researchers also looked at the expression of the forkhead domain protein foxQ2, which functions downstream of six3. Forkhead box genes are an important class of transcription factors which frequently lack the signature homeodomains and zinc-finger regions common to other transcription factors. Instead they have a unique DNA-binding region that has the shape of a winged helix. The forkhead gene, fox2p, in humans has recently garnered a lot of media attention for its apparent role in neural development, and in even more esoteric functions like speech development. FoxQ2 is known to be a well-conserved marker for the most anterior tip of a variety of bilaterians including sea urchines, drosophila, and cephalochordates. The researchers established that before gastrulation in cnidarians, foxQ2a was expressed in the aboral pole, and in a small number cells resembling neurons. Afterwards the expression of this “ring gene” was excluded from a central spot. In conclusion, the expression of genes for anemone head development, away from the mouth region, suggests that head development came first and was a separate event from mouth development. Secondarily, the head and a coalescing brain appear to have merged to become a centralized control center. Where does our head come from? Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2013 Phys.org Journal information: PLoS Biology Citation: Which came first the head or the brain? (2013, March 28) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-03-brain_1.html More information: Sinigaglia C, Busengdal H, Leclère L, Technau U, Rentzsch F (2013) The Bilaterian Head Patterning Gene six3/6 Controls Aboral Domain Development in a Cnidarian. PLoS Biol 11(2): e1001488. doi:10.1371/journal.pbio.1001488AbstractThe origin of the bilaterian head is a fundamental question for the evolution of animal body plans. The head of bilaterians develops at the anterior end of their primary body axis and is the site where the brain is located. Cnidarians, the sister group to bilaterians, lack brain-like structures and it is not clear whether the oral, the aboral, or none of the ends of the cnidarian primary body axis corresponds to the anterior domain of bilaterians. In order to understand the evolutionary origin of head development, we analysed the function of conserved genetic regulators of bilaterian anterior development in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis. We show that orthologs of the bilaterian anterior developmental genes six3/6, foxQ2, and irx have dynamic expression patterns in the aboral region of Nematostella. Functional analyses reveal that NvSix3/6 acts upstream of NvFoxQ2a as a key regulator of the development of a broad aboral territory in Nematostella. NvSix3/6 initiates an autoregulatory feedback loop involving positive and negative regulators of FGF signalling, which subsequently results in the downregulation of NvSix3/6 and NvFoxQ2a in a small domain at the aboral pole, from which the apical organ develops. We show that signalling by NvFGFa1 is specifically required for the development of the apical organ, whereas NvSix3/6 has an earlier and broader function in the specification of the aboral territory. Our functional and gene expression data suggest that the head-forming region of bilaterians is derived from the aboral domain of the cnidarian-bilaterian ancestor.Synopsys: www.plosbiology.org/article/in … journal.pbio.1001484last_img read more

Mamata releases Braille edition of autobiography Jiban Sangram

first_imgKolkata: Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee released the Braille version of her autobiography titled Jiban Sangram.On Friday, Banerjee released the book at Nabanna. The Braille version will help millions of visually challenged people to go through the book, which is a narrative of her journey into the life of Chief Minister.Amway India undertook the initiative jointly with its NGO partner Turnstone Global and converted the book into its Braille version. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsDr Kanchan Gaba, secretary of Turnstone Global, and Chandra Chakraborty, Regional Manager (East) of Amway India, handed over the Braille version of the book to the Chief Minister. It may be mentioned that five books penned by the Chief Minister including Amar Nabajanma, Sishubela and Rudraksha, were favourite ones in the International Kolkata Book Fair held in January. Amar Nabajanma is a collection of essays based on the current socio-political scenario, while Sishubela is a collection of rhymes for children.Upalabdhi is the first book of Banerjee, who was conferred with honorary DLitt for her contribution to Bengali literature, and it was sold more than 50,000 copies. Manusher Joy, Anashan Kano and Kanyar Chokhe Kanyashree are very popular among readers.last_img read more

How obesity spreads among members of social network

first_imgNot just emotions but any information is “contagious” on social networks that can even trigger the spread of real-world human behaviour like smoking and obesity, say researchers, including one of Indian-origin.“In large social networks, our model demonstrated that information is ‘contagious’ in much the same way that behaviour seems to be contagious,” said one of the researchers Suparna Rajaram of Stony Brook University in New York. “These results suggest that information transmission is a critical mechanism underlying the social transmission of behaviour,” Rajaram noted. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Using advanced computer modelling, the researchers found that the memory of one individual can indirectly influence that of another shared via social connections. The researchers incorporated well established cognitive processes into computer models capable of simulating groups much larger than those typically seen in laboratory research. Then, to see how information would spread throughout a large group, the researchers created a model that placed individuals into large, realistic networks and allowed them to interact with their neighbours. As one might expect, the results showed that direct neighbours showed more similar knowledge than did individuals who were indirectly linked through a shared neighbour. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixHowever, the individuals who shared a neighbour, but who never interacted with each other, showed more similar knowledge than those who were separated by two people in the network.This suggests that a shared neighbour acts as a go-between, transmitting information to the individuals on either side, allowing them to indirectly influence each other. “Taken together, the findings of the current study leverage laboratory results and explanations to develop a much-needed theoretical account of behaviour in large social networks,” the researchers said. The findings were published in the journal Psychological Science.last_img read more