Deputies investigating homicide in Lemon Grove

first_img June 21, 2018 KUSI Newsroom KUSI Newsroom, Updated: 9:13 AM Deputies investigating homicide in Lemon Grovecenter_img LEMON GROVE (KUSI) – A bleeding, gravely injured man banged on the door of a Lemon Grove home in an apparent last-gasp plea for help, and his death a short time later prompted sheriff’s deputies to launch a homicide investigation, authorities said Friday.A resident in the 7600 block of Lemon Avenue called 911 a little before 9 p.m. Thursday to report hearing loud banging on the front door of the home, which is situated in a mostly commercial zone down the street from The Home Depot, San Diego County Sheriff’s Lt. Rich Williams said“When deputies arrived they found a man unresponsive and lying on the ground outside the residence,” Williams said. “He was seriously injured and had visible injuries to his upper body.”Firefighters attempted to revive the man, but he was pronounced dead just before 9:20 p.m., Williams said. The victim had not been identified as of early Friday morning.Homicide detectives were assigned to investigate the case, and the San Diego County Medical Examiner’s Office was expected to perform an autopsy to determine the cause and manner of death, Williams said.Anyone with information about the apparent slaying was asked to call the sheriff’s homicide detail during business hours at (858) 974-2321 or during non-business hours at (858) 565-5200. Anonymous tipsters can also contact San Diego County Crime Stoppers at (888) 580-8477, or online at sdcrimestoppers.org. Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Posted: June 21, 2018last_img read more

Hyundai is working on a rearwheel drive electric scooter that docks in

first_img 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better 9 Photos Hyundai i30 N Project C gets racier Post a comment 0 5:43 Tags Enlarge ImageThis lithium-ion-powered beauty has suspension and it’s rear-wheel drive. Hyundai Scooters are so hot right now that it seems everyone is trying to get in on them. First, we had companies like Bird and Lime, then Uber and Lyft, not to mention Segway and God knows who else, but the latest company to show up to the party is Hyundai, according to an announcement by the company on Tuesday.Yep, the South Korean car company that makes vehicles like the Veloster and the Palisade is considering producing a two-wheeled electric scooter, and here’s the kicker — it could be included with future Hyundai and Kia vehicles.If that sounds like an off-beat but cool idea, know that Hyundai didn’t think of it. Honda offered its tiny Honda City car with a foldable gasoline-powered scooter called the Motocompo in the mid-1980s, and it’s still one of the coolest things ever.Anyway, the Hyundai scooter prototype has a claimed range of 20 kilometers (that’s around 12.5 miles in old money), do approximately 12.5 mph, and unlike most of those lame rental scooters, this baby is rear-wheel drive. Do you know what that means? Wheelies, dude. Wheelies.It’ll be powered by a lithium-ion battery, and when the scooter is docked in a vehicle it’ll automatically recharge said battery. Other cool features include the addition of suspension to the scooter’s front wheel, so as you silently waft your way through a major city, you don’t rattle your fillings out because of dilapidated infrastructure.”This is the vehicle-mounted personal scooter [that] could be featured in future Hyundai Motor Group vehicles,” said DongJin Hyun, head of the Hyundai Motor Group Robotics team. “We want to make our customers’ lives as easy and enjoyable as possible. Our personal electric scooter makes first- and last-mile commuting a joy, while helping to reduce congestion and emissions in city centers.”Future developments could, according to Hyundai, include a regenerative braking system that would be able to recover up to 7% of the vehicle’s battery charge. Hyundai makes no mention of whether it’ll be able to do sick tail-whips at the skate park though. Hyundai Palisade is a surprisingly palatial three-row… Share your voice 2019 Chevy Malibu review: Swing and a miss Now playing: Watch this: 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous More From Roadshow Hyundai Roadshow Hyundailast_img read more

Diabetes cases reach 422 million as poorer countries see steep rises

first_imgThere are four times more people living with diabetes today than there was in 1980. On the eve of World Health Day, which focuses this year on how to beat diabetes, the World Health Organization (WHO) says the number of patients with the condition has reached an all-time high of 422 million compared to 108 million in 1980.In its Global Report On Diabetes, the WHO also emphasises that priority should be put on prevention and research for treatments. Diabetes directly caused 1.5 million deaths in 2012, and led to 2.2 million further related deaths mainly due to a raised cardiovascular risk. However, the reports authors say many of these deaths could have been avoided by promoting healthier habits and improving care and treatments of the disease. Promoting healthy lifestylesThe report points out that the diabetes epidemic is fuelled by unhealthy lifestyles, and by rising obesity. It is indeed a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. In 2014, over a third of adults worldwide were overweight and more than 1 in 10 were obese.The WHO advocates population-based prevention strategies. For example, smoking is a risk factor for diabetes and the report highlights that it can be reduced by a combination of legislative, regulatory, fiscal and educational measures. These include graphic warnings on cigarette packs, bans on advertising and increased tobacco taxes. More importantly, the organisation says that healthy eating and exercising should be even more promoted than it already is. An adequate diet includes replacing saturated fatty acids with polyunsaturated fatty acids and eating enough dietary fibre (present in lentils, beans, peas and other fruits and vegetables). The WHO has published a complete set of guidelines that can be checked on its website. If we are to make any headway in halting the rise in diabetes, we need to rethink our daily lives: to eat healthily, be physically active and avoid excessive weight gain, Dr Margaret Chan, WHO director-general, said in a statement.Increasing access to different medicinesThe Sustainable Development Goals, signed in 2015, introduced the so-called target 3.4, which strives to reduce premature deaths from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) by 30% by 2030. In order for this to be achieved, more needs to be done to increase availability and affordability of life-saving medicines. In the case of diabetes, access to insulin is crucial, but there are huge inequalities worldwide with regards to accessing it.Around 100 years after the insulin hormone was discovered, the Global Report On Diabetes shows that essential diabetes medicines and technologies, including insulin, needed for treatment are generally available in only one in three of the worlds poorest countries, points out Dr Etienne Krug, director of WHOs Department For The Management of NCDs, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention.To beat diabetes and make the World Health Days slogan become a reality, countries still have a long way to go.last_img read more