Deputies investigating homicide in Lemon Grove

first_img June 21, 2018 KUSI Newsroom KUSI Newsroom, Updated: 9:13 AM Deputies investigating homicide in Lemon Grovecenter_img LEMON GROVE (KUSI) – A bleeding, gravely injured man banged on the door of a Lemon Grove home in an apparent last-gasp plea for help, and his death a short time later prompted sheriff’s deputies to launch a homicide investigation, authorities said Friday.A resident in the 7600 block of Lemon Avenue called 911 a little before 9 p.m. Thursday to report hearing loud banging on the front door of the home, which is situated in a mostly commercial zone down the street from The Home Depot, San Diego County Sheriff’s Lt. Rich Williams said“When deputies arrived they found a man unresponsive and lying on the ground outside the residence,” Williams said. “He was seriously injured and had visible injuries to his upper body.”Firefighters attempted to revive the man, but he was pronounced dead just before 9:20 p.m., Williams said. The victim had not been identified as of early Friday morning.Homicide detectives were assigned to investigate the case, and the San Diego County Medical Examiner’s Office was expected to perform an autopsy to determine the cause and manner of death, Williams said.Anyone with information about the apparent slaying was asked to call the sheriff’s homicide detail during business hours at (858) 974-2321 or during non-business hours at (858) 565-5200. Anonymous tipsters can also contact San Diego County Crime Stoppers at (888) 580-8477, or online at sdcrimestoppers.org. Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Posted: June 21, 2018last_img read more

Game of Thrones darkness enhanced the terror production designer says

first_img7:17 Now playing: Watch this: Game of Thrones Season 8 Episode 4: The good, the bad… Game of Thrones HBO 187 Photos Tags Share your voice What about the representation of women in front of the camera? As a viewer, there have been moments that have been very uncomfortable to watch for me as a woman.Riley: I’m only there to service the story, to serve the directors and the showrunners. Women throughout history have not always had an easy time, and I have no problem whatsoever with showing that in all of its ugliness. The showrunners always have known there would be characters like Cersei and Daenerys that would rise. I’ve always had faith in them, and my job as a production designer is not really to ask.So you know how the show ends?Riley: I think I know how it ends, but I haven’t seen episode 6. I first received an outline of season 8 a year and a half ago, so I had a secret for a really long time. It’ll be fascinating. The great thing is people have no idea how far the show still has to go. 0 TV and Movies See all the Game of Thrones season 8 photos Post a comment If you think watching Game of Thrones is a grueling emotional experience, try working on it. For Production Designer Deborah Riley, season 8’s Battle of Winterfell was just one of the tough assignments in her time on the show. “To re-create death and violence like that over a long period of time … it’s wearing,” she says. “It really saps your soul.”Despite being “traumatized and exhausted” by the scale of the job, Riley describes Game of Thrones as a “fantastic” experience she’s sad to leave behind. As production designer, it’s her role to define the look of the show through sets and props. both physical and created with CGI. Having learned the ropes working on The Matrix and Moulin Rouge, the Australian has led the production design of the dragon drama since its fourth season, winning four Emmy Awards, a Bafta and several Art Directors Guild gongs along the way. Production Designer Deborah Riley and Art Director Paul Ghirardani in September 2018 with their Emmy for Outstanding Production Design for a Narrative Period or Fantasy Program (one hour or more). Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images As the eighth and final season builds to a climax, viewers of season 8’s third episode The Long Night complained they couldn’t see much of the dramatic Battle of Winterfell. Riley defends the creative decision of cinematographer Fabian Wagner. “We always received lots of criticism before about Game of Thrones being dark,” Riley told me over the phone. “I actually thought it added an extra layer — the fact you couldn’t see everything made it all the more terrifying. To me, it enhanced rather than detracted.”Here’s a lightly edited transcript of my chat with Riley.   Q: You’ve been the production designer of seasons 4 to 8 in Game of Thrones. What was it like to inherit the world of Westeros rather than starting from scratch?Riley: I always thought I was incredibly lucky to get the job on Game of Thrones. It never bothered me at all that this show had three seasons beforehand. Frankly, I didn’t have enough experience at that point in time to start a whole show myself. And the show kept growing throughout the years, so I was able to go and establish my own [designs].Game of ThronesThe Meereen audience chamber as seen on season 5 of Game of Thrones. HBO What locations and sets are you most proud of?Riley: I was always very proud of the Meereen audience chamber in season 4, purely because that was the first major set we built for season 4. There was a lot of pressure, a lot of people looking at me to see what I would do. So I felt that once that audience chamber was established, hopefully people felt it was in a sure pair of hands.Deborah RileyDeborah Riley on the set of Game of Thrones. Macall Polay/HBO What were the biggest challenges?Riley: The frozen lake of season 7, episode 6, Beyond The Wall. That was an absolutely astonishing thing we had to create. A certain part was shot on location in Iceland, but also because of the large amount of stunts and visual effects we had to bring the scene back to Belfast. So we created a complete frozen landscape in a quarry up in the hillside of Belfast. It was extraordinary to see an entire quarry concreted and turned into a frozen lake. It was so convincing. It was months and months of work in really punishing weather, but the result was absolutely fantastic.How hard is it to keep the secrets of Game of Thrones, and how much do your family and friends nag you for information?Riley: If you worked on the show, we care for it so much that we just don’t want to spoil it for anybody. Really the only time I’ve struggled [was] when I finished season 8. I was quite traumatized, I was so exhausted, and there were so many things that I wanted to talk about but I couldn’t. How was your experience in the show?Riley: It was absolutely fantastic, the five and a half years that I worked on the show. But at the same time, the story was told. So there was also a resignation to it … and I was incredibly proud as well. Such a mixture of feelings, but the main one I remember was just absolute exhaustion. Game of Thrones, temporada 8The mandala left by the Night King that we saw in episode 1 of season 8. Helen Sloan/HBO Does it help a little bit that now you can finally start talking about it? The show hasn’t ended yet, but at least we’ve seen some of the episodes.Riley: Yeah, well, I mean I’ve been able to show photographs, because I’ve never shared with my friends or family photographs from July 2017 to July 2018. So, for instance, the mandala that the Night King left, I have pictures of us putting it up on that wall. And it’s such a macabre thing.Can you talk about some of the other women who worked behind the scenes?Riley: There are a lot of women behind the camera. The executive producer, Bernie Caulfield, was more or less head of the show. She’s an extraordinary personality. A lot of the production office were also women. Michele Clapton, the costume designer. There were women in all of the departments. In Australia, the shooting crews would probably have more women. In construction, you would see more women. Certainly, in the art department, we had a lot of women [in Game of Thrones] in the drawing room and in set decoration. It’s a great place to be — it’s also a punishing place to be. There’s a lot of long hours and often in dreadful conditions. last_img read more

Houstons Bike Plan Moves Closer To A Vote But City Officials Question

first_img To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Listen Gail DelaughterHouston B-Cycle Executive Director Carter Stern addresses the City Council Transportation Committee on the Houston Bike Plan. Gail DelaughterHouston cycling advocate Rose Nolen rode to the meeting in high heels on the bike she named “Batman.”The plan calls for hundreds of miles of new bike routes and it also features guidelines for future infrastructure projects. Houston Planning Director Patrick Walsh says they’re focused on about $50 million worth of bike projects over the next decade.But members of the City Council Transportation Committee question whether they should use money from ReBuild Houston, the voter-approved initiative for street and drainage work. Walsh says they’re seeking funds from different sources but he thinks ReBuild money would be appropriate. “ReBuild Houston is our primary means for reconstructing streets,” says Walsh. “And ReBuild Houston today does reconstruct streets including sidewalks.”  Discussion of the Bike Plan comes a little over a week after two cyclists died in separate accidents involving light rail trains.  Cyclist Rose Nolen told the committee there’s a sense of urgency in getting the plan approved. “My biggest pull is for the children,” says Nolen. “You don’t put a dollar amount on a person’s life.”It’s expected City Council will act on the Bike Plan later this month. X 00:00 /01:08 Sharelast_img read more

US Company Turned Blind Eye To Wild Behavior On Iraq Base

first_img Share Associated PressThis undated photo obtained by the Associated Press shows an Iraqi bodyguard hired by Sallyport Global to protect VIPs. When a Toyota SUV was stolen from Balad air base, he became the chief suspect and was linked to a dangerous Iran-backed militia and was viewed by investigators as “a hard-core recruit to become a terrorist who poses a serious threat to all personnel on this base.”WASHINGTON (AP) — The two American investigators felt a sense of foreboding that Sunday as they headed to an emergency meeting with their boss on the Iraqi air base. But they didn’t expect to be surrounded by armed guards, disarmed, detained against their will — and fired without explanation.It was March 12 — less than two months ago. Robert Cole and Kristie King were in Iraq working as investigators for Sallyport Global, a U.S. company that was paid nearly $700 million in federal contracts to secure Balad Air Base, home to a squadron of F-16 fighter jets as part of the U.S.-led coalition to annihilate the Islamic State.Cole and King had spent more than a year together in Iraq investigating all manner of misconduct at Balad and beyond.They’d uncovered evidence that Sallyport employees were involved in sex trafficking, they said. Staff on base routinely flew in smuggled alcohol in such high volumes that a plane once seesawed on the tarmac under the weight. Rogue militia stole enormous generators off the base using flatbed trucks and a 60-foot crane, driving past Sallyport security guards.Managers repeatedly shut down Cole and King’s investigations and failed to report their findings to the U.S. government that was footing the bill, the investigators said.Right before they were fired, Cole and King had opened an investigation into allegations of timesheet fraud among Sallyport employees. In a call with Sallyport lawyers, they said, they were advised to keep two sets of books about potential crimes and contract violations.“One for the government to see and one for the government not to see,” King told The Associated Press.In a statement to the AP, Sallyport said it follows all contracting rules at the base, home to the F-16s that are a key to the fight against the Islamic State.“Sallyport has a strong record of providing security and life support services in challenging war zones like Iraq and plays a major but unheralded role in the war against ISIS,” Chief Operating Officer Matt Stuckart wrote. “The company takes any suggestion of wrongdoing at Balad very seriously.”More than 150 documents obtained by AP, as well as interviews with more than a half-dozen former or current Sallyport employees, show how a contractor ran amok after being hired for lucrative and essential combat support operations. The investigators and other witnesses describe grave security breaches and illegal schemes that went unreported until the government asked about them.The point behind requiring contractors to employ their own investigators was to limit the waste and corruption that has marred federal security contracting going back to the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks.The Pentagon’s own auditors, who were frequently on the base 50 miles north of Baghdad, were not told of the serious problems until early this year, a potential violation of law. The Pentagon auditors’ reports, obtained by the AP, detail dozens of more minor infractions. That gap illustrates the limits of U.S. oversight for billions of dollars in contracts run by companies that have cashed in on the fight to protect Americans from extremism.The Defense Department declined to comment.The morning of March 12, King had gone to church and was still carrying her Bible when she and Cole walked into the office foyer for the meeting with the boss. To their astonishment, they were immediately surrounded by armed security guards and forced to turn over the 9 mm pistols they both routinely carried on the job.The boss, David Saffold, informed them they were being fired but wouldn’t say why.“We knew too much,” King told AP in an interview at her home in Amarillo, Texas. “They want to cover it up and move on because it’s a huge amount of money.”____BODYGUARD OR TERRORIST?In 2004, Rob Cole was a retired California police officer and licensed private investigator when he decided to go to Iraq for a series of contracting jobs. Like many U.S. contractors working in hazardous regions, he went because the work paid a lot more than he could make back home.Americans have been at Balad on and off since 2003. Sallyport’s parent company, Michael Baker International, announced in 2014 its subsidiaries had been awarded $838 million for work on the base.Cole’s first job at Balad was cut short in June 2014, a month after he arrived, when the Islamic State group began sweeping across Iraq and Syria. The extremists ultimately made it to the gates of Balad, which was evacuated.When the Americans went back, they found a looted base largely under the control of Iranian-backed Shiite militias that were supporting the Iraqi government, according to former employees. A former senior manager told the AP that Sallyport reached an understanding with the militias that they would not enter the flight and residential areas. He declined to be named because he wasn’t authorized to discuss the matter and didn’t want to be blacklisted from future jobs.Cole, now 62, returned to Balad in May 2015, as Sallyport was preparing for the arrival of American F-16s sold to the Iraqi government. Sallyport’s mission, along with its parent company, was to keep the base operating smoothly, train the Iraqis, and most importantly maintain security on the base, where thousands of Iraqis and hundreds of contractors work.The federal contract required investigations into potential crimes and violations involving the company’s work at Balad. That was Cole and King’s assignment.“They wanted someone to be competent enough to process an investigation, if there was a crime, or if someone turned up dead,” King said. “The way it was put to me: If someone turned up with a knife in their back, who are you going to call?”From the start, it was clear that much was awry on the base. Despite the urgency of fighting IS, the delivery of the F-16s had been delayed by months amid security concerns. It would be catastrophic if IS seized the base and its multimillion-dollar jets.On July 13, 2015, four F-16s flew in from Arizona, the first of 36 fighter jets that the U.S. planned to deliver.Brett McGurk, then the U.S. deputy envoy for the international coalition against IS, hailed the arrival in a tweet .“After years of preparation & training in the U.S., Iraqi pilots today landed the 1st squadron of Iraqi F16s in #Iraq,” he wrote.The first security breach came in less than 24 hours: A long black skid mark on the tarmac was reported. It stopped about 45 yards from the nose of one of the fighter jets. A truck had plowed through a rope barrier in the “no-go” zone, where lethal force is authorized to protect the planes. For more than 10 minutes, no one even responded as the vehicle drove away, according to reports citing surveillance video.That turned out not to be a terrorist. But Cole says the out-of-control truck was a harbinger. He noted the lax protection for the F-16s in his report and forwarded it to the chief of security, Steve Asher. Under the requirements of the contract, Cole’s report should have then made its way to the Pentagon. But he says Asher kept a lid on the incident.Three months later, in October 2015, Cole reported another security breach, the theft of a Toyota SUV that Sallyport had assigned to bodyguards to drive VIPs around the base. Cole eventually uncovered a plot by three Iraqi Sallyport staff working with a dangerous Iran-backed militia, known as Kataib Imam Ali.The Shiite militia was an ongoing headache, politically connected and operating outside the law, with sidelines in theft and gunrunning. It has ties to the leader of the umbrella militia Popular Mobilization Forces, which is on the U.S. list of designated terrorists.To Cole’s astonishment, the prime suspect threatened to join the militia during his interrogation. He was a Sallyport bodyguard. In fact, the investigators later found a photo of him on his Facebook page, dressed in black militia garb and a patch indicating his allegiance to the group.He is “viewed by the Investigations Unit as a hard-core recruit to become a terrorist who poses a serious threat to all personnel on this base,” Cole wrote in another report.The Toyota was recovered within a few days, but Cole was ordered off the case. In an interview with AP, the former senior manager defended the company’s order, saying negotiations with the militias were highly sensitive and had to be handled with Iraqi cooperation. Still, the suspect was supposed to be banned from the base, and Cole later saw the man walking around freely.___GUMMY BEARS SOAKED IN VODKAThe longer Cole was on the base, the more he suspected that management was turning a blind eye to criminal activity.On the books, Balad is a dry base, where alcohol is restricted. But in reality the booze was everywhere and everyone knew it. Finding out how it got there led to more troubling questions.A Sallyport employee who worked in the air terminal reported in late 2015 that co-workers were involved in a smuggling scheme. They were bringing in cases and cases of water bottles filled with liquor that they’d sneaked onto planes flying in from Baghdad.According to investigative documents and people who watched the smuggling in action, three empty suitcases would routinely be loaded onto a flight to Baghdad. Each time, the bags came back with plastic water bottles filled with liquor. When they were unloaded, the bags were not searched but taken directly outside to be picked up — a serious security risk in a war zone.“You could be putting a bomb in there,” said one former employee who witnessed the smuggling. “You’ve got people just going rogue.” He spoke only on condition of anonymity because he didn’t want to imperil his new job with a different overseas contractor.Steve Anderson, who worked on flight logistics, says he was pressured to sign off on faked flight manifests that omitted passenger names and falsified the weight of cargo to cover for the alcohol smuggling and other infractions — a violation of international flight regulations. The planes were getting so weighed down he was worried about flight safety.“They were playing Russian roulette with the passengers’ lives — including mine,” Anderson said.Once, he watched a plane that was being unloaded tip nose-forward on its wheels onto the tarmac because it was so overloaded.“I could hear the people inside the aircraft yelling. I never seen anything like that in my entire life,” he recalled. “It was like a seesaw.”Then out came the telltale bags that he watched get shepherded around security.When Anderson aired his concerns to management and refused to sign the falsified manifests, his boss said he didn’t want to hear about any more problems.“He said, ‘If you don’t like the job that you’re doing maybe you ought to find somewhere else to work.’”Anderson went on a medical leave and was told his position had been filled when he sought to return.Rumors of the alcohol smuggling reached Cole and King separately. Informants told them that flight line staff, who directed airplanes on the runways and handled cargo, were showing up drunk. In one instance they had passed around a bowlful of gummy bears soaked in vodka .The investigators got a tip that the bootleggers were working out of two hotels in Baghdad.Thinking they were undercover, King and an Iraqi investigator on the team went to one of the hotels, the al-Burhan, five minutes from Baghdad’s airport. She said informants told them the smuggling was run by the hotel manager and a number of Sallyport employees.During their interviews, they discovered an even more alarming scheme.The hotel had been running a prostitution ring, and Sallyport employees were among the customers, informants said. Four Ethiopian women who had worked as prostitutes at the hotel were later hired in housekeeping by Sallyport, and were still sending money back to a pimp in the al Burhan.The evidence suggested, the investigators told the AP, that Sallyport managers had either knowingly or unwittingly abetted human trafficking involving vulnerable female immigrants in a war zone, a revelation the company would be required to report to the U.S. government under federal law.In the hotel’s courtyard, a prime smuggling suspect, who was a Sallyport employee, angrily confronted King and said that a senior manager at the headquarters in Virginia, Roy Hernandez, had tipped him off about the investigation.On Feb. 15, 2016, Cole and King were ordered by Sallyport’s Balad program manager, Kim Poole, to shut down the investigations into both the bootlegging and the prostitution on Hernandez’s instructions, according to the investigators.The following day, Sallyport sent out an email to staff warning that they might be audited over trafficking and noting that they were required to report violations.But Stuckart says the prostitution allegations were not substantiated.“It is absurd to suggest that the company would shut down an inquiry into a matter of such gravity,” he said.More than a year later, two of the Ethiopian women were still working on the base, Cole said, and the alcohol smuggling had started back up, according to a report obtained by AP dated May 28, 2016.___“IT WAS MIND-BLOWING”Late last year, it became clear that little had changed after the earlier security breaches. On Nov. 15, Cole got a report that three large generators had been stolen from the base for a total loss of $1 million.According to surveillance videos, just before 2 a.m., militia had driven two flatbed trucks and a crane onto the base, driving right past the security gate. Cole estimates the crane, when extended, was at least 60 feet tall. After successfully loading the three generators and partially covering them with burlap, the militia drove off the base unchallenged. The episode lasted three hours.Cole said they passed within about ten feet of the Sallyport security guard force. “Nobody reported anything. It was a disaster and it was covered up. That is absolutely covered up,” he said. “What if the intent was not to steal but to commit a terrorist act?”According to Sallyport’s Stuckart, the theft occurred when the Iraqi base commander “granted local militia members access to the base” and said the generators weren’t located in his company’s security zone. “Sallyport had no authority to keep these militia members from taking the generators.”It was after that incident that a Defense Department auditor, who normally concerned himself with bin tagging, trash collection and the accounting minutiae of base life, began asking questions.Cole and King had kept all their reports in an investigative log. They had also flagged the important cases to management and they had assumed that the company informed the government.It became clear from the auditor’s question that he knew nothing about it. “When we finally got the idea that they were hiding all of the stuff from the U.S. government, it was mind-blowing,” said King.By then, clouds were looming for Cole and King. They had begun yet another investigation into timesheet fraud after getting a tip that Sallyport employees were systematically collecting salaries but not working.They say the company stalled the investigation, ordered every step to be approved by its lawyers and finally told Cole and King in a conference call to keep two sets of books.The implication for Cole was that they should omit from the government’s copy anything that would “be controversial and would reveal any failure or embarrassing detail.” The lawyers explained that that information was covered under attorney-client privilege. The two investigators, sitting together on the other end of the call, looked at each other in disbelief and shook their heads“We realized right away that that’s fraud, probably a crime, and we weren’t going to be a part of it,” Cole said.Shortly after they notified Sallyport that they wanted to interview managers who were suspects, their boss, Saffold, asked them to come to his office. It was Sunday morning, and King left church early.At an interview in his family home in Georgia, Cole recalled the fine sand that stuck to his sweat as he walked across the base to the meeting. Saffold ordered armed guards to take their pistols and detain the two at their work stations. King burst into tears, and the guards apparently thought better of restraining her when she said she wanted to bring her Bible back to her quarters, the investigators say.Cole and King said their termination paperwork was signed by the human resources manager they were investigating as part of the timesheet fraud.In an interview in Amarillo, Texas, where King has returned to work as a sheriff’s deputy, she expressed regrets.“It hurts me that I had to leave and not correct issues that were occurring, and it hurts me that they want to cover them up,” she said. “It’s so painful to me, it makes me lose sleep at night. Something’s wrong and did not get right.”___Hinnant contributed from Paris. Susannah George in Baghdad and Jack Gillum in Washington contributed. Follow Butler on Twitter at https://twitter.com/desmondbutler and Hinnant at https://twitter.com/lhinnant .___Online: Read documents about Sallyport’s activities in Iraq at http://apne.ws/2p87fqZ .____Have a tip on government contracting? Contact the authors securely at https://www.ap.org/tipslast_img read more

Mamata releases Braille edition of autobiography Jiban Sangram

first_imgKolkata: Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee released the Braille version of her autobiography titled Jiban Sangram.On Friday, Banerjee released the book at Nabanna. The Braille version will help millions of visually challenged people to go through the book, which is a narrative of her journey into the life of Chief Minister.Amway India undertook the initiative jointly with its NGO partner Turnstone Global and converted the book into its Braille version. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsDr Kanchan Gaba, secretary of Turnstone Global, and Chandra Chakraborty, Regional Manager (East) of Amway India, handed over the Braille version of the book to the Chief Minister. It may be mentioned that five books penned by the Chief Minister including Amar Nabajanma, Sishubela and Rudraksha, were favourite ones in the International Kolkata Book Fair held in January. Amar Nabajanma is a collection of essays based on the current socio-political scenario, while Sishubela is a collection of rhymes for children.Upalabdhi is the first book of Banerjee, who was conferred with honorary DLitt for her contribution to Bengali literature, and it was sold more than 50,000 copies. Manusher Joy, Anashan Kano and Kanyar Chokhe Kanyashree are very popular among readers.last_img read more

Bringing art closer to common people

first_imgTo bring art and artists from the world at one platform, Lalit Kala Akademy’s first International Art Fair is being held at IGNCA, Delhi. The Kala Mela is proving to be a world-class exhibition place for every artist. In order to add a feather on the cap, there is a long list of participants who want to spread the essence of their art to common people. On the fourth day, International Art Fair was abuzz with artists and art lovers. In such art-loving atmosphere, the main glimpses of the day were Violin by Nuno Flores, Portugal, screening of Portuguese film ‘Glances at Distance’, 26-minutes long film screening on artist duo Gilbert and George and another film screening on S H Raza. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfG Azhicode, a mural artist from Kerala, exhibits the beauty of traditional Kerala in his mural paintings at the festival. The artist came all the way from the coastal state to be a part of International Art Fair and it fetched him worth-drooling art-contract from IGNCA for three years, for mural and canvas paintings. Azhicode is not the only artist to get a contract at the Art Fair. 26-years-old Anamika shares similar excitement. She cracked a deal with Delhi’s Roki Art Gallery to exhibit her work. Holding fort for famous artists like Arpan Bhowmik, art curator Arup Chatterjee gleefully announces that a wall full of Arpan Bhowmik’s paintings have been purchased by art lovers. Arpan Bhowmik is a renowned artist who is famous for depicting quintessential forms of cities in his paintings has also introduced mini-paintings in the Kala Mela at a very affordable rate. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveThe event was inaugurated by M Venkaiah Naidu, Vice President of India on February 4. Speaking on the occasion, CS Krishna Setty, Administrator, Lalit Kala said, “The mission behind organizing International Kala Mela is to bring artists and art-lovers from across the globe to a single platform. Art must not be restricted to a few, it should be loved and praised by the mass too.”Apart from normal art talks, each day of Kala Mela is scheduled to offer something exciting. Being held at Indira Gandhi National Craft and Art Centre, New Delhi, every day between 12 pm and 8 pm, the fair will last until February 17.last_img read more