Governor Newsom signs bill to limit use of force by police

first_img August 19, 2019 Governor Newsom signs bill to limit use of force by police Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom KUSI Newsroom, 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Gov. Gavin Newsom today signed legislation co- authored by a San Diego lawmaker that redefines when law enforcement officers can use deadly force.AB 392, co-written by Assemblywoman Shirley Weber, D-San Diego, will hold law enforcement officers liable for homicide if an investigation finds the use of deadly force on a civilian was necessitated by the officer’s ownactions. Law enforcement will still be able to use deadly force as self- defense, but only when “necessary.”Weber co-authored the legislation, dubbed the California Act to Save Lives, with Assemblyman Kevin McCarty, D-Sacramento. Sen. Toni Atkins, D-San Diego, introduced the bill in the state Senate.“We were told by so many that it could not happen and we had felt that we were at the brink of failure at one point in this whole process,” Weber said. “I felt the weight of the families. It’s been a difficult journey because they entrusted me with trying to make change. My greatest fear is that if we had failed, those who want to make change will never work to do it again.”Weber and McCarty introduced a similar bill last year after two Sacramento police officers shot and killed Stephon Clark, an unarmed black man, but it made little progress in the legislature. Weber said she battled with former Gov. Jerry Brown and opposition from law enforcement over the bill, even threatening a hunger strike last year.The two officers were not charged in Clark’s death. Sacramento County District Attorney Anne Marie Schubert ruled in March that they were legally justified in killing Clark because they said they felt they were in imminentdanger. The decision prompted public outcry and further inflamed the national conversation about police violence and its ties to race.“It’s one thing to sign a piece of paper, pass legislation,” Newsom said. “It’s another to change hearts and minds, to change culture. To change the way people conduct themselves, to hold themselves to a higher standard …That’s the work that we, collectively as a community, need to manifest at peril of missing this moment and missing the point of this moment.”At one time, AB 392 appeared stalled again amid unresolved tensions between state legislators and law enforcement officials. That tension dissolved when the two sides struck a deal in May to amend the bill by changing “reasonable” to “necessary” and removing language mandating officers to use lethal force only after using non-lethal alternatives.As a result of the deal, state law enforcement groups like the California Highway Patrol, Peace Officers Research Association of California and California State Sheriffs’ Association shifted their official stance on the bill from opposition to neutrality.A second piece of legislation, currently mired in the Assembly’s committee process, would require law enforcement agencies to train officers in accordance with AB 392. SB 230 would also standardize de-escalation trainingrequirements statewide in an effort to ensure all stakeholders are on the same page.SB 230 is supported, in part, by a coalition of PORAC, the California Police Chiefs and the California Association of Highway Patrols.“Together, AB 392 and SB 230 will modernize our state’s policies on the use of force, implementing the very best practices gathered from across our nation,” CPCA President Ron Lawrence said. “Once both bills are signed and take effect, the real work can begin using the training made available to officers by SB 230 to implement the AB 392 standard.”Whether SB 230 will become law in addition to AB 392 remains to be seen.In May, the San Diego City Council voted 6-2 in favor of a resolution supporting the bill. The previous month, the San Diego County Board of Supervisors voted to oppose the bill.Both votes came after contentious public hearings and opposition from local law enforcement organizations like the Deputy Sheriffs’ Association of San Diego County and the San Diego Police Officers Association, which argued that law enforcement agencies already have policies designed to keep law enforcement officers in check.AB 392 passed in the Senate 34-4, with four senators declining to record a vote, while the Assembly approved it 68-0 with 12 assembly members declining to vote.It will go into effect on Jan. 1, 2020. Posted: August 19, 2019last_img read more

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT Wilmingtons Joshua Buske Named To Deans List At University Of Hartford

first_imgWEST HARTFORD, CT — The University of Hartford is pleased to announce Joshua Buske, of Wilmington, has been named to its Dean’s List for Fall 2018.Spread across seven dynamic schools and colleges, the University of Hartford has been guiding the purpose and passion of students for over six decades. On our 350-acre campus alongside Connecticut’s capital city, approximately 5,000 undergraduate and 1,800 graduate students from 48 states and 46 countries come together for a common purpose: to collaborate across different disciplines, diversify perspectives, and broaden worldviews. We’re a four-year private university focused on advancing the public good through meaningful connections within our communities. Our unique approach to comprehensive education gives us the critical perspectives that lead to impactful change, regionally and beyond. With degree programs spanning the arts, humanities, business, engineering and technology, education, and health professions, we focus on doing the work that matters.(NOTE: The above announcement is from the University of Hartford via Merit.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSTUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Wilmington’s Joshua Buske Named To Dean’s List At University Of HartfordIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Wilmington’s Joshua Buske Named To Dean’s List At University of HartfordIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Wilmington’s Joshua Buske Named To Dean’s List At University Of HartfordIn “Education”last_img read more

Worker killed in Magura road crash

first_imgA worker was killed and two others injured in a road accident at Belnagar on Magura-Kamarkhali road on Wednesday night, reports UNB.The deceased is Afsar Uddin, 60, a resident of Talkhori in Salikha upazila in Magura.Magura police station officer-in-charge Ilius Hossain said the accident took place when a sand-laden mini truck hit a roadside tree as its driver lost control over the steering, leaving one worker on board dead on the spot and two others injured.The injured were taken to Magura Sadar Hospital. A case was filed.last_img read more

Report Twitter to List on NYSE Fearing IPO Mishap on Nasdaq

first_img Twitter reportedly plans to list itself on the New York Stock Exchange rather than the Nasdaq when it becomes a publicly traded company.The reason for avoiding Nasdaq, which lists many tech companies, is the fear of a glitch-plagued IPO like the one Facebook suffered last year, according to an exclusive report by TheStreet.com. Facebook’s first trading day was a mess of delays and technical problems that led to some trades not going through. The Securities and Exchange Commission fined Nasdaq $10 million for the botched IPO, citing Nasdaq’s “poorly designed systems and hasty decision-making.”Twitter’s IPO, which will likely take place in late 2013 or early 2014, is expected to bring in about $1.5 billion for the social network, TheStreet.com reports.Twitter did not respond to Entrepreneur.com’s request for comment.On September 12, Twitter announced via its own social network that it had confidentially filed paperwork with the Securities and Exchange Commission for a planned IPO. The confidential filing was made possible by a provision of the JOBS Act that went into effect last year.The stealth filing option is only available for companies with less than $1 billion in annual revenue. Twitter is expected to earn $583 million in advertising revenue this year, and come close to $1 billion in ad earnings next year.Like many companies on the verge of an IPO, Twitter is seeking a line of revolving credit. With Goldman Sachs said to be leading the IPO, that leaves rival firms JPMorgan Chase and Morgan Stanley — who also reportedly will have roles in the IPO — to lead the credit line of $500 million to $1 billion. This stockpile of cash will keep Twitter flush in the event that its market debut has to be put on hold.Related: Wall Street to Nasdaq: What’s Your Problem? Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. 2 min read September 24, 2013 Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more