Game of Thrones darkness enhanced the terror production designer says

first_img7:17 Now playing: Watch this: Game of Thrones Season 8 Episode 4: The good, the bad… Game of Thrones HBO 187 Photos Tags Share your voice What about the representation of women in front of the camera? As a viewer, there have been moments that have been very uncomfortable to watch for me as a woman.Riley: I’m only there to service the story, to serve the directors and the showrunners. Women throughout history have not always had an easy time, and I have no problem whatsoever with showing that in all of its ugliness. The showrunners always have known there would be characters like Cersei and Daenerys that would rise. I’ve always had faith in them, and my job as a production designer is not really to ask.So you know how the show ends?Riley: I think I know how it ends, but I haven’t seen episode 6. I first received an outline of season 8 a year and a half ago, so I had a secret for a really long time. It’ll be fascinating. The great thing is people have no idea how far the show still has to go. 0 TV and Movies See all the Game of Thrones season 8 photos Post a comment If you think watching Game of Thrones is a grueling emotional experience, try working on it. For Production Designer Deborah Riley, season 8’s Battle of Winterfell was just one of the tough assignments in her time on the show. “To re-create death and violence like that over a long period of time … it’s wearing,” she says. “It really saps your soul.”Despite being “traumatized and exhausted” by the scale of the job, Riley describes Game of Thrones as a “fantastic” experience she’s sad to leave behind. As production designer, it’s her role to define the look of the show through sets and props. both physical and created with CGI. Having learned the ropes working on The Matrix and Moulin Rouge, the Australian has led the production design of the dragon drama since its fourth season, winning four Emmy Awards, a Bafta and several Art Directors Guild gongs along the way. Production Designer Deborah Riley and Art Director Paul Ghirardani in September 2018 with their Emmy for Outstanding Production Design for a Narrative Period or Fantasy Program (one hour or more). Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images As the eighth and final season builds to a climax, viewers of season 8’s third episode The Long Night complained they couldn’t see much of the dramatic Battle of Winterfell. Riley defends the creative decision of cinematographer Fabian Wagner. “We always received lots of criticism before about Game of Thrones being dark,” Riley told me over the phone. “I actually thought it added an extra layer — the fact you couldn’t see everything made it all the more terrifying. To me, it enhanced rather than detracted.”Here’s a lightly edited transcript of my chat with Riley.   Q: You’ve been the production designer of seasons 4 to 8 in Game of Thrones. What was it like to inherit the world of Westeros rather than starting from scratch?Riley: I always thought I was incredibly lucky to get the job on Game of Thrones. It never bothered me at all that this show had three seasons beforehand. Frankly, I didn’t have enough experience at that point in time to start a whole show myself. And the show kept growing throughout the years, so I was able to go and establish my own [designs].Game of ThronesThe Meereen audience chamber as seen on season 5 of Game of Thrones. HBO What locations and sets are you most proud of?Riley: I was always very proud of the Meereen audience chamber in season 4, purely because that was the first major set we built for season 4. There was a lot of pressure, a lot of people looking at me to see what I would do. So I felt that once that audience chamber was established, hopefully people felt it was in a sure pair of hands.Deborah RileyDeborah Riley on the set of Game of Thrones. Macall Polay/HBO What were the biggest challenges?Riley: The frozen lake of season 7, episode 6, Beyond The Wall. That was an absolutely astonishing thing we had to create. A certain part was shot on location in Iceland, but also because of the large amount of stunts and visual effects we had to bring the scene back to Belfast. So we created a complete frozen landscape in a quarry up in the hillside of Belfast. It was extraordinary to see an entire quarry concreted and turned into a frozen lake. It was so convincing. It was months and months of work in really punishing weather, but the result was absolutely fantastic.How hard is it to keep the secrets of Game of Thrones, and how much do your family and friends nag you for information?Riley: If you worked on the show, we care for it so much that we just don’t want to spoil it for anybody. Really the only time I’ve struggled [was] when I finished season 8. I was quite traumatized, I was so exhausted, and there were so many things that I wanted to talk about but I couldn’t. How was your experience in the show?Riley: It was absolutely fantastic, the five and a half years that I worked on the show. But at the same time, the story was told. So there was also a resignation to it … and I was incredibly proud as well. Such a mixture of feelings, but the main one I remember was just absolute exhaustion. Game of Thrones, temporada 8The mandala left by the Night King that we saw in episode 1 of season 8. Helen Sloan/HBO Does it help a little bit that now you can finally start talking about it? The show hasn’t ended yet, but at least we’ve seen some of the episodes.Riley: Yeah, well, I mean I’ve been able to show photographs, because I’ve never shared with my friends or family photographs from July 2017 to July 2018. So, for instance, the mandala that the Night King left, I have pictures of us putting it up on that wall. And it’s such a macabre thing.Can you talk about some of the other women who worked behind the scenes?Riley: There are a lot of women behind the camera. The executive producer, Bernie Caulfield, was more or less head of the show. She’s an extraordinary personality. A lot of the production office were also women. Michele Clapton, the costume designer. There were women in all of the departments. In Australia, the shooting crews would probably have more women. In construction, you would see more women. Certainly, in the art department, we had a lot of women [in Game of Thrones] in the drawing room and in set decoration. It’s a great place to be — it’s also a punishing place to be. There’s a lot of long hours and often in dreadful conditions. last_img read more

Howard Grad Returns to Roots in Senate Race

first_imgCalifornia Attorney General Kamala Harris (Twitter Photo)WASHINGTON – Kamala Harris, the California attorney general and the early odds-on favorite to become the state’s first Black U.S. senator, returned to her Howard University roots during homecoming week to raise money and reconnect with her sorority members, longtime friends and supporters.Harris, who political experts say is the frontrunner in the race to replace retiring Sen. Barbara Boxer, hosted a few private events and fundraisers last week to further solidify her network of supporters.“I came to reconnect with friends and supporters and hear their concerns,” she said.Howard, she said, has been a special place in her career and her life. “Howard is really a place that teaches us who we can be, and most importantly teaches us we can be anybody,” she said.The attorney general said it was important to meet with her fellow members of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority’s Alpha Chapter, which was founded in 1908 at Howard University.“My sorors support me spiritually and professionally,” Harris said.  “That’s the great thing about a sisterhood.”Harris’ time at Howard was spent studying economics and political science, arguing on the debate team and working with Howard University Student Association (HUSA).It was at Howard where she won her first election, becoming the freshman class representative the College of Arts and Sciences.  The experience molded her political career and sense of duty towards people who need their voices to be heard, she said.“I was working with HUSA in our tiny office creating priorities around folks that needed a voice,” she said.After graduating from Howard in 1986, Harris returned to her hometown in the San Francisco Bay area and earned a degree from University of California Hastings College of the Law. Harris was deputy district attorney of Alameda County and district attorney of San Francisco before receiving the Democratic nomination for California attorney general in 2010.One of Harris’ main priorities has been to reduce recidivism among California inmates.  According to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation 2013 Report, 61 percent of California inmates find themselves back in institutions within three years of release. Harris, California’s first Black woman attorney general, said as she talked with friends and others during homecoming week, they were focused on, “criminal justice reform, early education, minimum wage, the environment and immigration.”Harris said she hopes to influence   young women to be persistent and determined in chasing their own success.“I always want to encourage young girls to never listen to or hear the word ‘no’,” Harris said, “I eat that word for breakfast. I hear ‘no’ maybe on the fifth time.”last_img read more

Nations Restricting International Data Flow Are Threatening the Global Digital Economy

first_imgOctober 2, 2017 Register Now » 4 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. For centuries, many of the most important catalysts for global trade and economic integration have been commodities — gold, silk, spices, sugar, and of course, oil. A new global commodity — data — has the potential to unleash extraordinary opportunities that will shape the world economy of the 21st century. But realizing these opportunities depends on data moving freely across borders, a notion that was once elementary, but today is under threat.Global data flows are fundamental to the digital economy that’s contributing to economic growth, driving innovation and stimulating job creation in the United States and throughout the world. McKinsey estimates that digital trade added $2.8 trillion to global GDP growth in 2014 alone, while also finding that trade in data has expanded 45-fold in the last 10 years. Another 9x growth is expected by 2020. According to the IMF’s World Economic Outlook from October 2016, trade in physical goods, by contrast, has been growing at only about three percent annually in recent years, which is less than half the average rate of expansion over the past three decades. Perhaps most noteworthy of all, McKinsey identifies the GDP impact of cross-border digital flows — a relatively recent entry to the global economy — as exceeding the impact of trade in goods.Related: The Equifax Data Breach Shows the Limitations of How Our Data is StoredWith so many countries around the world experiencing modest economic growth rates, policymakers should be focused on maximizing the opportunities emanating from the data-driven digital economy. Regrettably, many jurisdictions have instituted measures that threaten these opportunities, with the potential to stifle the long-term growth of the digital economy.Today, 34 countries have laws and regulations in effect that hinder the flow of data across borders, either making such flows more expensive or restricting them altogether, according to the Information Technology & Innovation Foundation. These policies can be found in countries spanning multiple regions (Africa, Asia-Pacific, Europe, North America and South America) and in many of the world’s largest economies. In China, for example, companies must store their data on servers that are based in the country, and there are a number of restrictions on transferring data outside the country.  These data localization laws have the potential to balkanize the digital economy and, in the process, stifle its growth. Companies will face higher costs in a number of areas, such as IT and compliance, both of which will impinge on their competitiveness. And the restrictions will stifle the cooperation that’s fundamental to corporate innovation. The net effects will be higher costs to consumers and reduced economic output.Related: How the Virtual Data Room Boom Is Transforming Business TransactionsWhat’s the best way to combat data localization measures? There are no simple solutions, and companies are ultimately obligated to comply with the laws of the jurisdictions in which they’re operating. But given data is so intertwined with global economic activity, it behooves U.S.-based companies to press policymakers to treat data the way they treat most physical products. And that would mean enshrining the free movement of data into the world’s trade agreements.The U.S. has an immediate opportunity ahead to lead by example. It has recently started negotiations with Mexico and Canada on how to modernize the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). One of the agenda items is setting new rules for digital trade, which was largely non-existent when the agreement took effect in 1994. Negotiators should affirm the free movement of data and prohibit it from being “localized” within the borders of one country. These ideas already have mainstream support — they were agreed to as part of the 12-nation Trans-Pacific Partnership. While that agreement has not been ratified, its data provisions provide a template for the renegotiated NAFTA as well as other trade pacts.Related: If You’re a Startup Looking to Capitalize on U.S.-China Border Investments, Here’s HowThe free flow of data is one of the underpinnings of today’s global economy and has the potential to deliver far-reaching benefits — helping to make businesses more efficient, more productive and more capable of addressing customers’ needs. But realizing those opportunities depends on policymakers coming together to support a forward-looking framework that ensures data — like other commodities before it — can be a source of opportunity and prosperity for people in the U.S. and throughout the world. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box.last_img read more

This woman used an Ikea hack to outsmart NYCs nobigdogsonsubway rule

first_imgThis woman used an Ikea hack to outsmart NYC’s no-big-dogs-on-subway rule Share Tuesday, June 4, 2019 NEW YORK CITY — Everyone’s got a favourite Ikea hack, whether it’s transforming a planter into a chandelier or turning a plain desk into a stylish bar cart. But one woman’s hack may have trumped them all after she was spotted on a New York City subway platform.To get around a pesky city policy that permits only dogs small enough to fit in a bag to travel on trains, the unidentified woman used an Ikea blue bag – yes, that Ikea blue bag – to get her dog onto the subway.But even though she could have carried her dog in the bag (everyone knows how roomy those blue bags are), the woman did one better – she cut out four leg holes in the bottom of the bag so that her dog could walk freely on their own.Genius!my favorite lifehack is NYC residents who follow the “your dog must fit in a bag to ride the subway” rule on the slimmest technicalities possible pic.twitter.com/O7ZTprwNWk— Christopher Sebela (@xtop) June 1, 2019Writer Christopher Sebela witnessed the woman’s stroke of genius and snapped a quick pic while waiting for the train. He then tweeted the photo and wrote: “My favourite lifehack is NYC residents who follow the “your dog must fit in a bag to ride the subway” rule on the slimmest technicalities possible.”More news:  Virgin Voyages de-activates Quebec accounts at FirstMates agent portalThe photo is reminiscent of another pic taken earlier this year of a man waiting for the subway with his shaggy dog casually slung over his shoulder in a big burlap sack. Despite his attempt at convincing the train conductor that the sack was, in fact, an extra-large tote bag, the conductor refused to let him board.No word as to whether the woman and her dog ended up making it on the train, but Ikea hacks very rarely let us down so the odds are good!Saw this guy arguing with an @MTA conductor about bringing his dog on the subway. Dude said the dog’s burlap sack was a bag; conductor said nope, wouldn’t let him on the train. @Gothamist @A_W_Gordon @2AvSagas #NYCSubway pic.twitter.com/qjgN5anKV3— Will Sabel Courtney (@WillSCourtney) April 7, 2019 Travelweek Group center_img Posted by Tags: Dogs, New York City << Previous PostNext Post >>last_img read more