Beyoncé JAYZ To Be Honored With GLAAD Vanguard Award

first_img Twitter Beyoncé & JAY-Z To Be Honored With GLAAD Vanguard Award Beyoncé & JAY-Z To Be Honored At GLAAD Awards beyonce-jay-z-be-honored-glaad-vanguard-award Facebook The GRAMMY-winning pair will receive the honor for their work as LGBTQ+ allies at the 30th Annual GLAAD Media Awards in Los Angeles on March 28Ana YglesiasGRAMMYs Mar 12, 2019 – 2:44 pm On March 11, GLAAD, the LGBTQ+ social justice non-profit organization, shared they will be honoring Beyoncé and JAY-Z for their work as allies of the gay community at their 30th Annual GLAAD Media Awards.center_img Email News The GRAMMY-winning pair will be presented with the organization’s Vanguard Award, which, as GLAAD explains, “is presented to allies who have made a significant difference in promoting acceptance of LGBTQ people. Beyoncé and JAY-Z are longtime allies and supporters of the LGBTQ community who use their global platforms to share messages that inspire and change the world for the better.”The annual awards ceremony celebrates “fair, accurate and inclusive representations of LGBTQ people and issues” in the media, recognizing LGBTQ+ changemakers—and their biggest allies—across music, film, TV, print media and more.”Beyoncé and JAY-Z are global icons and passionate defenders of human rights and acceptance for all people,” GLAAD President and CEO Sarah Kate Ellis said in a statement on their site.She continues: “When Beyoncé and JAY-Z speak, the world becomes inspired and when it comes to LGBTQ people, their voices of acceptance have been heard loud and clear. We could not be prouder to stand with them to send a message of love during the biggest LGBTQ event in the world and to honor their work to bend the arc of justice forward for LGBTQ people, people of color and marginalized communities everywhere.”GLAAD points to the couple embracing the queer community on their social-media platforms, in their music and videos, and more. They highlight Beyoncé choosing to include queer individuals and couples in her videos for “All Night” and “Formation,” the latter which won Best Music Video at the 59th GRAMMY Awards. They also underscore her advocacy for the community, as she continues to speak up against laws that would discriminate against the LGBTQ+ community and proudly supports marriage equality.The org explains that JAY-Z also publically supported the nationwide passage of marriage equality, and points to examples of celebrating LGBTQ+ leaders in his work. The music video for “Family Feud,” from his 4:44 album, opens with a quote from the late social justice writer James Baldwin, a queer black man, and features a cameo from transgender activist Janet Mock.”Smile,” also from 4:44, tells the story of Jay’s mother, Gloria Carter, who came out as a lesbian publically for the first time on the song. Both Jay and Carter were presented with GLAAD’s Special Recognition Award at the 2018 event for the touching, personal song and video.Jay and Bey are among the top GRAMMY winners of all time. Most recently, at the 61st GRAMMY Awards, they each earned another GRAMMY, for the collaborative album they released as The Carters. The powerful LP, Everything Is Love, won Best Urban Contemporary Album.GLAAD will also hold an awards ceremony in New York City on May 4, where another GRAMMY-winning musical/pop culture icon, Madonna, will be honored with the Advocate For Change Award. The nominees up for awards this year include GRAMMY winner Brandi Carlile, GRAMMY nominees Janelle Monáe, SOPHIE, plus Hayley Kiyoko, Christine and the Queens, Troye Sivan and BROCKHAMPTON.The L.A. event will be hosted by Ross Mathews and will feature special guests that include the cast of “Queer Eye” and GRAMMY winner Dan Reynolds of Imagine Dragons.VINCINT, Brandon Stansell, Linda Perry & More LGBTQ+ Artists Share Their Journeys To Self-AcceptanceRead morelast_img read more

India flood toll hits 324

first_imgIndian passengers travel in a truck to a safer place as flood waters ravaged the National Highway 47 in Ernakulam district of Kochi, in the Indian state of Kerala, on 17 August 2018. Troop reinforcements stepped up desperate rescue attempts in India`s flood-stricken Kerala state on 17 August after more than 100 bodies were found in a day and a half, taking the crisis death toll to at least 164. Photo: AFPThe death toll from floods that have triggered landslides and sent torrents sweeping through villages in the Indian state of Kerala trebled Friday to 324, authorities said, amid warnings of worse weather to come.Hundreds of troops and local fishermen are staging desperate rescue attempts with helicopters and boats across the southern state, which draws international tourists to its tropical hills and beaches.Kerala has been battered by record monsoon rainfall this year and is “facing the worst floods in 100 years”, chief minister Pinarayi Vijayan said in a Twitter statement, adding that 324 lives had been lost so far.With thousands still trapped, power and communication lines down and fresh alerts of further torrential rain, authorities warned of more trouble ahead and further deaths to come.”We are deploying more boats and army to ramp up rescue operations,” senior state government official P.H. Kurian told AFPMore than 30 military helicopters and 320 boats are attempting rescues across Kerala.Authorities said thousands of people have been taken to safety so far but 6,000 more are still waiting for rescue.India residents stand on the shore as Periyar river flooded following monsoon rains at Aluva, in the Indian state of Kerala, on 16 August, 2018. Photo: AFPHelicopters have also been dropping emergency food and water supplies, while special trains carrying drinking water have been sent to Kerala.According to India’s weather bureau, since the beginning of June more than 321 centimetres (126 inches) of rain has fallen on the hilly central Kerala district of Idukki, which is now virtually cut off from the rest of the state.With no end in sight to the deluge, people all over the state of 33 million people have made panic-stricken appeals on social media for help, saying they cannot make contact with rescue services.”My family and neighbouring families are in trouble,” wrote Ajo Varghese, a resident of the coastal city of Alappuzha, in a Facebook post that quickly went viral.”No water and food. Not able to communicate from afternoon. Mobile phones are not reachable… Please help,” he added.- ‘Extremely grave’ -Other messages have been sent from people trapped inside temples and hospitals as well as their homes.The Kerala government has said it faces an “extremely grave” crisis and state chief minister Vijayan warned of a new wave of rainfall hitting the battered region over the weekend. Strong winds have also been predicted for Saturday and Sunday.Indian navy and rescue personnel evacuate local residents in a boat at Aluva, in the Indian state of Kerala, on 16 August, 2018. Photo: AFPThe gates of dozens of dams and reservoirs across the state have been opened as water levels reach danger levels, inundating many other villages.North and central Kerala have been worst-hit by the floods with the international airport in the main city of Kochi shut until at least 26 August.At least 220,000 people displaced from across the state are taking shelter in more than 1,500 relief camps.On top of tourist cancellations, Kerala’s valuable rubber industry has been badly hit by the floods.The government says 10,000 kilometres (6,000 miles) of Kerala roads have been destroyed or damaged, along with thousands of homes.News reports said electricity supplies to more than half the state have been cut. The state power company said that only one million people were affected, however.The home ministry announced meanwhile that 868 people have been reported dead in seven Indian states including Kerala since the start of the monsoon in June.last_img

Howard Grad Returns to Roots in Senate Race

first_imgCalifornia Attorney General Kamala Harris (Twitter Photo)WASHINGTON – Kamala Harris, the California attorney general and the early odds-on favorite to become the state’s first Black U.S. senator, returned to her Howard University roots during homecoming week to raise money and reconnect with her sorority members, longtime friends and supporters.Harris, who political experts say is the frontrunner in the race to replace retiring Sen. Barbara Boxer, hosted a few private events and fundraisers last week to further solidify her network of supporters.“I came to reconnect with friends and supporters and hear their concerns,” she said.Howard, she said, has been a special place in her career and her life. “Howard is really a place that teaches us who we can be, and most importantly teaches us we can be anybody,” she said.The attorney general said it was important to meet with her fellow members of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority’s Alpha Chapter, which was founded in 1908 at Howard University.“My sorors support me spiritually and professionally,” Harris said.  “That’s the great thing about a sisterhood.”Harris’ time at Howard was spent studying economics and political science, arguing on the debate team and working with Howard University Student Association (HUSA).It was at Howard where she won her first election, becoming the freshman class representative the College of Arts and Sciences.  The experience molded her political career and sense of duty towards people who need their voices to be heard, she said.“I was working with HUSA in our tiny office creating priorities around folks that needed a voice,” she said.After graduating from Howard in 1986, Harris returned to her hometown in the San Francisco Bay area and earned a degree from University of California Hastings College of the Law. Harris was deputy district attorney of Alameda County and district attorney of San Francisco before receiving the Democratic nomination for California attorney general in 2010.One of Harris’ main priorities has been to reduce recidivism among California inmates.  According to the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation 2013 Report, 61 percent of California inmates find themselves back in institutions within three years of release. Harris, California’s first Black woman attorney general, said as she talked with friends and others during homecoming week, they were focused on, “criminal justice reform, early education, minimum wage, the environment and immigration.”Harris said she hopes to influence   young women to be persistent and determined in chasing their own success.“I always want to encourage young girls to never listen to or hear the word ‘no’,” Harris said, “I eat that word for breakfast. I hear ‘no’ maybe on the fifth time.”last_img read more