Everton rules out big transfer plans for January

first_imgFor Marcel Brands, Everton’s director of football, the team is focused on the transfer market window of the summer, not on the one from this month.Everton director of football Marcel Brands has ruled out a “big” transfer window for the team in January.According to the executive, the team is focusing on the summer transfer window instead.Premier LeaguePremier League Betting: Match-day 5 Stuart Heath – September 14, 2019 Going into the Premier League’s match-day five with a gap already beginning to form at the top of the league. We will take a…“We don’t have big plans. It’s a very difficult period to bring players in,” he said to Sky Sports.“We don’t want to let our best players go, also other clubs don’t. I’m more focused on the summer window than the January window.”“If we sell or loan players, then maybe we have to do something, and if we do something, it has to be good,” he concluded.last_img read more

Game of Thrones darkness enhanced the terror production designer says

first_img7:17 Now playing: Watch this: Game of Thrones Season 8 Episode 4: The good, the bad… Game of Thrones HBO 187 Photos Tags Share your voice What about the representation of women in front of the camera? As a viewer, there have been moments that have been very uncomfortable to watch for me as a woman.Riley: I’m only there to service the story, to serve the directors and the showrunners. Women throughout history have not always had an easy time, and I have no problem whatsoever with showing that in all of its ugliness. The showrunners always have known there would be characters like Cersei and Daenerys that would rise. I’ve always had faith in them, and my job as a production designer is not really to ask.So you know how the show ends?Riley: I think I know how it ends, but I haven’t seen episode 6. I first received an outline of season 8 a year and a half ago, so I had a secret for a really long time. It’ll be fascinating. The great thing is people have no idea how far the show still has to go. 0 TV and Movies See all the Game of Thrones season 8 photos Post a comment If you think watching Game of Thrones is a grueling emotional experience, try working on it. For Production Designer Deborah Riley, season 8’s Battle of Winterfell was just one of the tough assignments in her time on the show. “To re-create death and violence like that over a long period of time … it’s wearing,” she says. “It really saps your soul.”Despite being “traumatized and exhausted” by the scale of the job, Riley describes Game of Thrones as a “fantastic” experience she’s sad to leave behind. As production designer, it’s her role to define the look of the show through sets and props. both physical and created with CGI. Having learned the ropes working on The Matrix and Moulin Rouge, the Australian has led the production design of the dragon drama since its fourth season, winning four Emmy Awards, a Bafta and several Art Directors Guild gongs along the way. Production Designer Deborah Riley and Art Director Paul Ghirardani in September 2018 with their Emmy for Outstanding Production Design for a Narrative Period or Fantasy Program (one hour or more). Alberto E. Rodriguez/Getty Images As the eighth and final season builds to a climax, viewers of season 8’s third episode The Long Night complained they couldn’t see much of the dramatic Battle of Winterfell. Riley defends the creative decision of cinematographer Fabian Wagner. “We always received lots of criticism before about Game of Thrones being dark,” Riley told me over the phone. “I actually thought it added an extra layer — the fact you couldn’t see everything made it all the more terrifying. To me, it enhanced rather than detracted.”Here’s a lightly edited transcript of my chat with Riley.   Q: You’ve been the production designer of seasons 4 to 8 in Game of Thrones. What was it like to inherit the world of Westeros rather than starting from scratch?Riley: I always thought I was incredibly lucky to get the job on Game of Thrones. It never bothered me at all that this show had three seasons beforehand. Frankly, I didn’t have enough experience at that point in time to start a whole show myself. And the show kept growing throughout the years, so I was able to go and establish my own [designs].Game of ThronesThe Meereen audience chamber as seen on season 5 of Game of Thrones. HBO What locations and sets are you most proud of?Riley: I was always very proud of the Meereen audience chamber in season 4, purely because that was the first major set we built for season 4. There was a lot of pressure, a lot of people looking at me to see what I would do. So I felt that once that audience chamber was established, hopefully people felt it was in a sure pair of hands.Deborah RileyDeborah Riley on the set of Game of Thrones. Macall Polay/HBO What were the biggest challenges?Riley: The frozen lake of season 7, episode 6, Beyond The Wall. That was an absolutely astonishing thing we had to create. A certain part was shot on location in Iceland, but also because of the large amount of stunts and visual effects we had to bring the scene back to Belfast. So we created a complete frozen landscape in a quarry up in the hillside of Belfast. It was extraordinary to see an entire quarry concreted and turned into a frozen lake. It was so convincing. It was months and months of work in really punishing weather, but the result was absolutely fantastic.How hard is it to keep the secrets of Game of Thrones, and how much do your family and friends nag you for information?Riley: If you worked on the show, we care for it so much that we just don’t want to spoil it for anybody. Really the only time I’ve struggled [was] when I finished season 8. I was quite traumatized, I was so exhausted, and there were so many things that I wanted to talk about but I couldn’t. How was your experience in the show?Riley: It was absolutely fantastic, the five and a half years that I worked on the show. But at the same time, the story was told. So there was also a resignation to it … and I was incredibly proud as well. Such a mixture of feelings, but the main one I remember was just absolute exhaustion. Game of Thrones, temporada 8The mandala left by the Night King that we saw in episode 1 of season 8. Helen Sloan/HBO Does it help a little bit that now you can finally start talking about it? The show hasn’t ended yet, but at least we’ve seen some of the episodes.Riley: Yeah, well, I mean I’ve been able to show photographs, because I’ve never shared with my friends or family photographs from July 2017 to July 2018. So, for instance, the mandala that the Night King left, I have pictures of us putting it up on that wall. And it’s such a macabre thing.Can you talk about some of the other women who worked behind the scenes?Riley: There are a lot of women behind the camera. The executive producer, Bernie Caulfield, was more or less head of the show. She’s an extraordinary personality. A lot of the production office were also women. Michele Clapton, the costume designer. There were women in all of the departments. In Australia, the shooting crews would probably have more women. In construction, you would see more women. Certainly, in the art department, we had a lot of women [in Game of Thrones] in the drawing room and in set decoration. It’s a great place to be — it’s also a punishing place to be. There’s a lot of long hours and often in dreadful conditions. last_img read more

Is Your Business Ready for the Internet of Things

first_img 6 min read Register Now » Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global March 14, 2019 Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box. Ten years ago, it would have been strange to stand alone in a room and tell that someone named “Alexa” to order pizza — but today, most of us take in stride the virtual assistance that AI provides. With the Internet of Things (IOT), consumers can now take on impossible tasks with ease. Answering the front door from a beach hundreds of miles away is easy; feeding the dog during a long night at the office requires only a few quick taps on a smartphone. With all of the feats it makes possible, IOT tech has developed a reputation for redefining how ordinary consumers enjoy their at-home experience. However, smart home devices constitute only a small tip of the overall IOT iceberg. Advances in technology stand to revolutionize the business world as much as if not more as they have our personal lives. That said, while the commercial opportunities in IOT are well-hyped in the media, many corporate executives have so far been cautious, remaining on the sidelines of this developing field. Today the question remains: Is it finally time for company leaders to take part in the technological revolution and integrate the Internet of Things into business life? Or is the commercial world still too wary of IOT’s strange potential to take advantage of it?Related: 25 Innovative IoT Companies and Products You Need to KnowWhat is the Internet of Things, exactly?Understanding what IOT can do for business starts with understanding IOT itself. Most laypeople know what these devices can do in their daily lives; however, providing a technical definition is often an entirely different challenge.Analysts describe the Internet of Things as “the interconnection of machines and devices through the internet, enabling the creation of data that yields analytical insights and supports new operations.” IOT solutions use these connections to cross-utilize wireless communications, networks, the cloud, and data storage. In doing so, they offer considerable opportunities for handling and analyzing massive amounts of data across geographically disparate locations. Related: 4 Reasons to Be Excited by the ‘Internet of Things’What can it do for business?The primary benefit IOT provides business lies in its capacity for boosting day-to-day efficiency. These solutions use data collected from social networks, traditional media, and internal and external networks to provide actionable intelligence that empowers machines and people to optimize their behaviors. Well-integrated IOT technologies can offer company leadership valuable feedback into how a company might improve their product functionality and better their user experience, as well as streamline production processes and supply chain management.Because these solutions can process more real-time data in a set period than a human could ever hope to, they also play a crucial part in developing financial decisions by providing real-time insights into the state of the business as a whole. The actionable intelligence sourced from IOT solutions complements that from a company’s accounting systems and enterprise resource planning (ERP) and, when taken together, can provide executives with a bird’s-eye view of the venture’s state and provide insights into potentially lucrative financial strategies. The benefits that IOT solutions provide are invaluable — however, some researchers have managed to put a number on the potential financial gain. According to a 2015 McKinsey study, IOT stands to save global businesses up to $11 trillion annually by 2025. Other experts in the field project that the technology will boost corporate profits by as much as 21 percent by 2022. Statistics like these command interest; a survey found that 45 percent of executives said that IOT-enabled manufacturing was a high or very high priority for their ventures. Interestingly, only 21 percent of those involved in the study worked directly in the manufacturing sector — a detail which implies that the interest for IOT goes far beyond its surface capabilities. Related: Blockchain Technology can be Critical to IoT Infrastructure SecurityWhy is IOT so underutilized?Unfortunately, interest doesn’t always equate to usage. Many executives have opted to observe the IOT field as it develops rather than actively integrate the potentially valuable technology into the day-to-day workings of their business. According to a study conducted by Capgemini, fewer than “four out of 10 organizations are deploying IOT in operations at full scale.” Moreover, those that do implement IOT technology center in a few choice industries; leaders include industrial manufacturing (62 percent), retail (46 percent), and telecommunications (38 percent). Their hesitancy is understandable, even if it does hold ventures back from potential gain. According to a study put forth by Hitachi, 32 percent of surveyed companies were unable to present a compelling return on investment for integrating IOT, another 32 percent struggled to keep potential solutions secure, 31 percent saw problems with cross-departmental cooperation, and 30 percent were unable to process the influx of data effectively. For all of its promise, the Internet of Things doesn’t readily or immediately lend itself to daily use. Integration demands strategy, troubleshooting, and countless hours of work; executives will undoubtedly face growing pains. The sheer amount of work and consideration that goes into applying IOT solutions stands as a strong deterrent to those who might otherwise leap on the chance to take advantage of the technology’s potential. Does this mean businesses shouldn’t use IOT?Every step towards progress demands some heavy lifting. Businesses should not steer clear of IOT solutions because they are imperfect or because they require company leaders to overcome logistical hurdles; the potential payoff is far too high. Moreover, IOT solutions will likely become a norm in business, making integration less of a tech-forward decision and more of a necessity for keeping up with the competition. Integrating IOT technology can and should be a priority; however, companies will need to have advanced analytics and development platforms in place to handle the influx of IOT data, as well as cyber security solutions that address any vulnerabilities that IOT technology creates in a company’s day-to-day systems.  As the CEO of a tech-forward steel manufacturer, I have seen the value that IOT solutions can provide to modern businesses firsthand. At Pacesetter, we’ve already taken basic steps to integrate IOT into our operations. To date, we have integrated sensors in our production lines that connect to our networks and create live dashboards for our operators. This update allowed us to optimize our reaction time and boost our understanding of our day-to-day efficiency. By analyzing data trends, we were able to determine what proactive steps we could take to improve our processes.Pacesetter is in the midst of exploring more ways to integrate technology and further optimize our operations — and it certainly isn’t alone in doing so. Staying on the cutting edge of technology has become inarguably vital to remaining competitive in nearly every industry. One point is for certain for all: the advances we see today are only a hint of what could benefit businesses in the future.last_img read more