PUBLIC MEETING HEARS ANGER OVER PLANS TO CLOSE LOUGH ANNA WATER SUPPLY

first_imgLough Anna outside Glenties.A public meeting was held last night in Glenties by the Save Lough Anna group. Over 250 people from Glenties, Ardara,Narin,Portnoo, Rosbeg and Fintown areas packed in to the community centre in Glenties.There was a lot of anger in the room towards Irish Water and their proposal to decommission one of the best the best raw water source in the whole North West.As the people in attendance made their points it became clear that this was a fight worth having and the room voted unanimously to join and fight the closure together.One of the main points of contention was that Irish waters proposed alternative supply was from a source which has to be treated by multiple chemicals rather than the natural spring lake of Lough Anna.“Just leave Lough Anna alone” was the words said most as this water source has been supplying these areas since 1925 with top quality drinking water.One of the things we want is for Irish Water to reassess the whole situation with the help of locals so they can realise how passionate the people of the area are about their quality drinking water.At the meeting a sub group of 25 people volunteered to sit and plan the way forward from here.The next public meeting will be with all our elected representatives.PUBLIC MEETING HEARS ANGER OVER PLANS TO CLOSE LOUGH ANNA WATER SUPPLY was last modified: June 25th, 2015 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:GlentiesIrish WaterLough Annalast_img read more

Warriors 129, Clippers 127: Stephen Curry, Kevin Durant prevail in crunch time

first_imgThe Warriors earned a 129-127 victory over the Los Angeles Clippers on Sunday with Curry and Durant making plays when they needed them the most. Curry scored 42 points while … CLICK HERE if you are having a problem viewing the photos or video on a mobile device* * *Subscribe to the Mercury News and East Bay Times for $40 a year and receive a free Warriors championship coffee table book* * *OAKLAND – When all else fails, the Warriors can rely on Stephen Curry or Kevin Durant.last_img

Cracks Found on Another Polaris VLOC

first_imgCracks have been found aboard another Polaris Shipping-operated very large ore carrier (VLOC), the 1994-built Stellar Queen, following an inspection of the ship which was conducted in Sao Luis, Brazil.A representative of Holman Fenwick Willan Singapore LLP, speaking on the authority of the ship’s operator told World Maritime News that “two small cracks” were found on the Stellar Queen’s deck.The cracks “have been inspected by Port State Control and by Class and repairs are underway,” the representative added.Featuring 304,850 dwt, the VLOC is currently anchored off the coast of Brazil. According to AIS data provided by MarineTraffic, the vessel is scheduled to start its journey to Changdao in China on June 27.The discovery was made on the back of the March 31 disappearance of Stellar Daisy, which prompted the South Korean ship operator to launch a special program for immediate inspection of all vessels currently operated.The 266,100 dwt vessel went missing and is believed to have sunk some 1,700 miles east of the Port of Montevideo, Uruguay. The ship was sailing from the Port of Guaiba, Brazil, to China, carrying 260,003 million tons of iron ore. The 1993-built Stellar Daisy was carrying eight South Korean and sixteen Filipino sailors. Two of the sailors were rescued on April 2.The ship was converted from a crude carrier to an ore carrier, a process that has been put under spotlight as it is believed that a crack in the ship’s hull caused the splitting in half and sinking of Stellar Daisy.In mid-April, the company informed that one of the firm’s vessels reported a crack on the outer hull of a tank while it was en route to the discharge port, near Cape Town. The vessel in question is the 1993-built bulk carrier Stellar Unicorn, which was carrying a cargo of 270,000 million tons iron ore bound for China at the time. The ship was also converted from a crude carrier to an ore carrier.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

US hits Iran with crippling cyberattacks says a report

first_img Related stories Hacking Military US Cyber Command powers up attacks against Russia’s electrical grid Facebook used in Iranian cyber-spying operation, US indictment says Iran-linked hackers reportedly targeted activists and US officials UN chief seeks international rules for cyberwarfare 3 Comments Last Saturday, The New York Times reported that US Cyber Command had moved from a defensive to offensive posture, apparently under a military authorization bill Congress passed in 2018 that gives the go-ahead for “clandestine military activity” in cyberspace to “deter, safeguard or defend against attacks or malicious cyberactivities against the United States.”Cyber Command also received new authority last year from the US president under a still-classified document called National Security Presidential Memoranda 13, the Times said.Asked to comment on the Post report, Department of Defense spokeswoman Heather Babb said that “as a matter of policy and for operational security, we do not discuss cyberspace operations, intelligence or planning.” The White House didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.Originally published June 22, 1:26 p.m. PTUpdate, 5:34 p.m.: Adds mention of spying charge against former US Air Force intelligence officer.center_img Security Tags Share your voice A US Army cadet during a cyberdefense exercise. CNET With an OK from the US president, the Pentagon this week launched cyberstrikes that took down Iranian computer networks used to control missile launches, says a report in The Washington Post, which cites unnamed people familiar with the matter. The news comes after Iran shot down a US surveillance drone it said was violating Iranian airspace. In response to the drone attack, the president had approved then pulled back from conventional military attacks on radar facilities, missile batteries and other targets in Iran. But the Thursday night cyberstrikes against the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps had been in preparation for some time, the Post reported, saying the Pentagon proposed them after Iran allegedly attacked two oil tankers in the Gulf of Oman earlier in June.”This operation imposes costs on the growing Iranian cyberthreat, but also serves to defend the United States Navy and shipping operations in the Strait of Hormuz,” Thomas Bossert, a former senior White House cyberofficial in the Trump administration, told the Post.”Our US military has long known that we could sink every IRGC vessel in the strait within 24 hours if necessary,” Bossert told the Post. “And this is the modern version of what the US Navy has to do to defend itself at sea and keep international shipping lanes free.”Referring to the Iranians, an anonymous source told the paper that “this is not something they can put back together so easily.”Cyberwarfare and cyberespionage aren’t new, but moves in these areas have grabbed headlines following Russian interference in the 2016 US presidential election and amid worries about Russian interference in the 2020 campaign. Other red flags have included Russia’s shutdown of part of Ukraine’s power grid in 2015, as well as reports that a Russian government-sponsored group had been able to gain access to the control rooms of US electric utilities in 2017.In February, a former US Air Force intelligence officer was charged with espionage for allegedly working with Iranian hackers who used Facebook to try to trick her former colleagues into downloading malware that would track their computer activity.last_img read more

Diabetes cases reach 422 million as poorer countries see steep rises

first_imgThere are four times more people living with diabetes today than there was in 1980. On the eve of World Health Day, which focuses this year on how to beat diabetes, the World Health Organization (WHO) says the number of patients with the condition has reached an all-time high of 422 million compared to 108 million in 1980.In its Global Report On Diabetes, the WHO also emphasises that priority should be put on prevention and research for treatments. Diabetes directly caused 1.5 million deaths in 2012, and led to 2.2 million further related deaths mainly due to a raised cardiovascular risk. However, the reports authors say many of these deaths could have been avoided by promoting healthier habits and improving care and treatments of the disease. Promoting healthy lifestylesThe report points out that the diabetes epidemic is fuelled by unhealthy lifestyles, and by rising obesity. It is indeed a risk factor for type 2 diabetes. In 2014, over a third of adults worldwide were overweight and more than 1 in 10 were obese.The WHO advocates population-based prevention strategies. For example, smoking is a risk factor for diabetes and the report highlights that it can be reduced by a combination of legislative, regulatory, fiscal and educational measures. These include graphic warnings on cigarette packs, bans on advertising and increased tobacco taxes. More importantly, the organisation says that healthy eating and exercising should be even more promoted than it already is. An adequate diet includes replacing saturated fatty acids with polyunsaturated fatty acids and eating enough dietary fibre (present in lentils, beans, peas and other fruits and vegetables). The WHO has published a complete set of guidelines that can be checked on its website. If we are to make any headway in halting the rise in diabetes, we need to rethink our daily lives: to eat healthily, be physically active and avoid excessive weight gain, Dr Margaret Chan, WHO director-general, said in a statement.Increasing access to different medicinesThe Sustainable Development Goals, signed in 2015, introduced the so-called target 3.4, which strives to reduce premature deaths from non-communicable diseases (NCDs) by 30% by 2030. In order for this to be achieved, more needs to be done to increase availability and affordability of life-saving medicines. In the case of diabetes, access to insulin is crucial, but there are huge inequalities worldwide with regards to accessing it.Around 100 years after the insulin hormone was discovered, the Global Report On Diabetes shows that essential diabetes medicines and technologies, including insulin, needed for treatment are generally available in only one in three of the worlds poorest countries, points out Dr Etienne Krug, director of WHOs Department For The Management of NCDs, Disability, Violence and Injury Prevention.To beat diabetes and make the World Health Days slogan become a reality, countries still have a long way to go.last_img read more