RMLD Offers Electric Heat Pump Water Heater Rebate To Customers

first_imgREADING, MA — As part of its Energy Star Appliance Rebate Program, RMLD offers residential customers a rebate of $500 on the purchase of an Electric Heat Pump Water Heater.An electric heat pump water heater works by pulling heat from the surrounding air to heat the water, and is two to three times more efficient than traditional electric water heaters that generate heat using electrical resistance. Because these devices work by pulling heat from the surrounding air, they work best when housed in a space with existing heat, such as a furnace room.Electric heat pump water heaters are also available in hybrid models that contain traditional electrical resistance heating which can be used during periods of high demand to ensure there is a sufficient supply of hot water.Click HERE to learn more about heat pump water heaters. Click HERE to see the details or RMLD’s program guidelines.(NOTE: The above announcement is from Reading Municipal Light Department.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedRMLD Invites Customers To Attend Free Electric Car Show In Wilmington On September 15In “Community”SAVE THE DATE: RMLD To Hold Family-Friendly Open House On October 10In “Community”RMLD Asks Residents To Conserve Energy During This Weekend’s Heat WaveIn “Government”last_img read more

Muhith sees 100pc chance of ALs return to power

first_imgFiance minister AMA Muhith holds a pre-budget discussion with Economic Reporters Forum (ERF) at his office in Bangladesh Secretariat on Wednesday. Photo: Prothom AloSet to place the last budget of the present government next month, finance minister Abul Maal Abdul Muhith on Wednesday said teachers of more educational institutions will be covered by official pay roll in the next year.One who earlier rejected possibility of bringing any more private school and college teachers under what is officially called monthly pay order (MPO) facility, Muhith is going to make the shift only a few months before the scheduled general elections.He, however, said the MPOs, which were plagued by criticism of politicisation, would not be targeted to the teacher but to the institutions with certain conditions imposed by his ministry.“MPO will be given to some institutions but it is not the education but the finance ministry which will decide on the terms and conditions,” said the minister at a pre-budget discussion with Economic Reporters Forum (ERF) at his office in Bangladesh Secretariat.Muhith also expressed confidence that his Awami League party’s chance of returning to power through the next election is 100 per cent.“If voted to power again, it is going to devolve power, to take decisions on preparing budget by the local government authorities,” he said citing examples of many countries where local governments are more powerful.The finance minister expressed his confidence that rate of poor people in the country would come down to 10 per cent by the year 2024, the year after the likely election to the 12th parliamentHe reiterated that the government is going to lower the corporate tax, which is now up to 45 per cent of net income, in the next (2018-19) budget.The finance minister is likely to place in parliament his 10th consecutive budget on 7 June and it is expected to be passed by parliament on 30 June.Asked about the budgetary opportunity of whitening black money, Muhith insisted that the law is there to allow legalising untaxed money giving certain percentage as penalty and tax.About tax that increases prices of consumer items, the minister gave his opinion in favour of no duty protection to local sugar mills. “Duty on sugar is given for protecting 150,000 workers of nationalised sugar mills, but they must be allowed to die,” he added.Improving quality of education and healthcare services, introducing bus for schoolchildren, preventing rising cost of living in cities, bringing middle class and industrial workers under social protection schemes, and addressing banking sector crisis are some of the suggestions that came from the journalists.ERF president Saiful Islam Dilal, its former presidents Monowar Hossain, Zakaria Kajal, Khawaza Main Uddin and Sultan Mahmud, ERF vice president Salahuddin Bablu, former ERF general secretary Abu Kawser and ERF acting general secretary Rizvy Newaz, among others, joined the discussion.last_img read more

India flood toll hits 324

first_imgIndian passengers travel in a truck to a safer place as flood waters ravaged the National Highway 47 in Ernakulam district of Kochi, in the Indian state of Kerala, on 17 August 2018. Troop reinforcements stepped up desperate rescue attempts in India`s flood-stricken Kerala state on 17 August after more than 100 bodies were found in a day and a half, taking the crisis death toll to at least 164. Photo: AFPThe death toll from floods that have triggered landslides and sent torrents sweeping through villages in the Indian state of Kerala trebled Friday to 324, authorities said, amid warnings of worse weather to come.Hundreds of troops and local fishermen are staging desperate rescue attempts with helicopters and boats across the southern state, which draws international tourists to its tropical hills and beaches.Kerala has been battered by record monsoon rainfall this year and is “facing the worst floods in 100 years”, chief minister Pinarayi Vijayan said in a Twitter statement, adding that 324 lives had been lost so far.With thousands still trapped, power and communication lines down and fresh alerts of further torrential rain, authorities warned of more trouble ahead and further deaths to come.”We are deploying more boats and army to ramp up rescue operations,” senior state government official P.H. Kurian told AFPMore than 30 military helicopters and 320 boats are attempting rescues across Kerala.Authorities said thousands of people have been taken to safety so far but 6,000 more are still waiting for rescue.India residents stand on the shore as Periyar river flooded following monsoon rains at Aluva, in the Indian state of Kerala, on 16 August, 2018. Photo: AFPHelicopters have also been dropping emergency food and water supplies, while special trains carrying drinking water have been sent to Kerala.According to India’s weather bureau, since the beginning of June more than 321 centimetres (126 inches) of rain has fallen on the hilly central Kerala district of Idukki, which is now virtually cut off from the rest of the state.With no end in sight to the deluge, people all over the state of 33 million people have made panic-stricken appeals on social media for help, saying they cannot make contact with rescue services.”My family and neighbouring families are in trouble,” wrote Ajo Varghese, a resident of the coastal city of Alappuzha, in a Facebook post that quickly went viral.”No water and food. Not able to communicate from afternoon. Mobile phones are not reachable… Please help,” he added.- ‘Extremely grave’ -Other messages have been sent from people trapped inside temples and hospitals as well as their homes.The Kerala government has said it faces an “extremely grave” crisis and state chief minister Vijayan warned of a new wave of rainfall hitting the battered region over the weekend. Strong winds have also been predicted for Saturday and Sunday.Indian navy and rescue personnel evacuate local residents in a boat at Aluva, in the Indian state of Kerala, on 16 August, 2018. Photo: AFPThe gates of dozens of dams and reservoirs across the state have been opened as water levels reach danger levels, inundating many other villages.North and central Kerala have been worst-hit by the floods with the international airport in the main city of Kochi shut until at least 26 August.At least 220,000 people displaced from across the state are taking shelter in more than 1,500 relief camps.On top of tourist cancellations, Kerala’s valuable rubber industry has been badly hit by the floods.The government says 10,000 kilometres (6,000 miles) of Kerala roads have been destroyed or damaged, along with thousands of homes.News reports said electricity supplies to more than half the state have been cut. The state power company said that only one million people were affected, however.The home ministry announced meanwhile that 868 people have been reported dead in seven Indian states including Kerala since the start of the monsoon in June.last_img

How obesity spreads among members of social network

first_imgNot just emotions but any information is “contagious” on social networks that can even trigger the spread of real-world human behaviour like smoking and obesity, say researchers, including one of Indian-origin.“In large social networks, our model demonstrated that information is ‘contagious’ in much the same way that behaviour seems to be contagious,” said one of the researchers Suparna Rajaram of Stony Brook University in New York. “These results suggest that information transmission is a critical mechanism underlying the social transmission of behaviour,” Rajaram noted. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Using advanced computer modelling, the researchers found that the memory of one individual can indirectly influence that of another shared via social connections. The researchers incorporated well established cognitive processes into computer models capable of simulating groups much larger than those typically seen in laboratory research. Then, to see how information would spread throughout a large group, the researchers created a model that placed individuals into large, realistic networks and allowed them to interact with their neighbours. As one might expect, the results showed that direct neighbours showed more similar knowledge than did individuals who were indirectly linked through a shared neighbour. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixHowever, the individuals who shared a neighbour, but who never interacted with each other, showed more similar knowledge than those who were separated by two people in the network.This suggests that a shared neighbour acts as a go-between, transmitting information to the individuals on either side, allowing them to indirectly influence each other. “Taken together, the findings of the current study leverage laboratory results and explanations to develop a much-needed theoretical account of behaviour in large social networks,” the researchers said. The findings were published in the journal Psychological Science.last_img read more