CHAMBER CORNER Learn About Wilmingtons Partners In Rehab Physical Therapy

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — The Wilmington-Tewksbury Chamber of Commerce profiles a different member in the local media each week.  In this week’s “Chamber Corner,” the Chamber is spotlighting Partners In Rehab Physical Therapy, located on Concord Street in Wilmington.Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedPHOTOS: Wilmington-Tewksbury Chamber Of Commerce Welcomes Partners In Rehab PT To WilmingtonIn “Business”CHAMBER CORNER: Meet Assunta Perez Of DaMore LawIn “Business”CHAMBER CORNER: Learn About Align Credit Union’s Student AccountsIn “Business”last_img read more

Who will win ICC World Cup Captains pick their favourites ahead of

first_imgThe ICC World Cup 2019 has well and truly begun. The different captains addressed a press conference ahead of the campaign and answered a host of questions. The biggest question which was asked, revolved around the side which would go ahead and win the World Cup. While the captains conceded that it would be a very closely contested tournament, they all pretty much believed that England is the favourites. This is what the different captains had to stay at the press conference: Captains pose with the ICC Cricket World CupICCAaron Finch, Australia captainThe Australian captain welcomed both David Warner and Steve Smith back in the fold and believed his side is very confident about defending their title.”I think, England has been in great form over the last couple of years and along with India, they’ve probably been the standout performers. So you’d have to say England are definitely the favourites.”Virat Kohli, India captain: Virat KohliHannah Peters/Getty Images”The way I look at it, there’s always going to be a huge fan-base for us anywhere we play in the world. But I have to agree with Aaron, I think England is probably – in their conditions – the strongest side in this tournament.He further added, “But I also agree with Morgs, that all ten teams are well balanced and strong. The fact that this is a tournament where we have to play everyone once, makes it all the more challenging. I think that’s going to be the best thing about this tournament, I see this as probably one of the most competitive World Cups that people are going to see.”Eoin Morgan, England captainEngland skipper Eoin Morgan said, “I don’t think anyone is head and shoulders above anyone else. These are the ten best teams in the world, it will be extraordinarily competitive and some quality cricket will be played so we are really looking forward to it.””Every captain sitting here would lose their left leg to play in a World Cup final at the home of cricket. It’s something every one of us would have dreamed of as a kid. We are as best prepared as we can be. We just want to play that first game now,” Morgan added.Faf du Plessis, South captainThe South African captain wants to be the first skipper to lead his side to the finals of this marquee event and wants his side to play with a lot of freedom on the day. He also believed that the bowlers of the different sides hold the key and they might well be the difference at the end of the day.”We are all really excited to try out this new tournament, to play every once I think is great. The way we use our resources will be vital, but every team has match winning bowlers that will have a big say in the successes of the side.””I think the bowlers will win it, the teams still in it towards the end of the tournament will be the teams that have done really well with the ball,” du Plessis said.Sarfaraz Ahmed, Pakistan captainThe Pakistan skipper sounded confident about his side being able to replicate the performance of the 2017 Champions Trophy.”All the teams are really balanced. I think people are going to watch some great cricket. Since winning the World Cup in 1992, making the final in 1999 here in England and the Champions Trophy in 2017, we are confident we will do well,” Sarfaraz said.Kane Williamson, New Zealand captainBack in 2015, New Zealand stumbled in the final against Australia, but the skipper is hopeful that his side can lay their hands on the coveted trophy this time. “There are a few guys in the squad from the last World Cup, which is great. But four years in between means there are a lot of new players. There have been talks about rankings, favourites, underdogs but what stands out is how balanced it is. Which means anything can happen on the day, which is so exciting,” Williamson said.Jason Holder, West Indies captainWest Indies are widely tipped to be the team to watch out for and the skipper believes this format allows his side to give it their best shot.”It is a very exciting format. In the past, you could play five or six games, and that could be it. To play every side is great for us. We worked hard in the qualifiers to get here, which means we are in the top ten in the world, we want to play them all and give ourselves a shot. The team that wins will definitely deserve it.”Dimuth Karunaratne, Sri Lanka captainSri Lanka appointed a new skipper in Dimuth Karunaratne just before the World Cup and the captain believes his side is in good shape since they came early to acclimatise to the conditions. “We have great experience in England, we came here early to get used to the conditions and we are in good shape, hoping to do our best. It is not going to be easy though. We are confident and we will take each game at a time.”Gulbadin Naib, Afghanistan captainPerhaps the most exciting team in the competition, Afghanistan can be giant slayers on any particular day and the new skipper wants his side to enjoy themselves in front of packed houses.”We are excited to be here, in front of the cricket world and to play the best teams. To represent Afghanistan in the World Cup feels great and we are looking forward to it. There will be a huge audience at home in all the different provinces. Cricket is not just a sport now, in Afghanistan it has become something else.”Mashrafe Mortaza, Bangladesh captainWith a good mix of youth and experience, Bangladesh looks like a settled unit and can be a threat in this format and this is what their captain Mashrafe Mortaza is banking on.”We have got a great bunch of boys, a good mix of seniors and juniors coming on. Cricket is a game that anyone on their day can beat anybody. If we start well we can hang in there. We are confident that we will do well, but a lot depends on the start,” Mortaza said.last_img read more

Road crash kills minor boy

first_imgRoad accident illustration by Prothom AloA minor boy was killed after being hit by a minibus at Hogla in Gomostapur upazila on Sunday morning.The deceased was Ibrahim, 7, son of Anarul of the village.Sub-inspector Aminul Islam of Gomostapur police station said the minibus bit Ibrahim while he was crossing the road near his house around 8 am, leaving him dead on the spot.On information, police arrested the bus driver Rabiul and seized his vehicle.last_img

Electronics like it cold and 30 K cryocooler delivers

first_img Copyright 2013 Phys.org All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of Phys.org. Journal information: Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering (Phys.org)—For many electronic devices, colder is better. At low temperatures, electronic devices such as sensors and detectors operate with a higher efficiency and better overall performance than they do at room temperature. And superconducting devices, known for their zero electrical resistance, require extremely cold temperatures to operate. But in order to make cryogenic electronics more widespread, micro-sized cryogenic coolers need to become cheaper and more reliable. Addressing this challenge, scientists have designed and fabricated a micro-sized cryocooler that cools devices down to 30 K (-243 °C, -406 °F) in about an hour, and has a simple design that lends itself to high-yield fabrication. The researchers, Haishan Cao from the University of Twente in Enschede, The Netherlands, and coauthors from Kryoz Technologies and Micronit Microfluidics, both in Enschede, as well as from the University of Twente, have published a paper on the new micro-sized cryogenic cooler in a recent issue of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering.The new cryocooler is a micro-sized version of a Joule-Thomson (JT) cryocooler, which cools by causing a high-pressure gas to expand as it flows from a high-pressure region to a low-pressure region. As James Joule and William Thomson discovered in 1852, a gas that expands in this way under certain conditions will cool down, a finding now known as the Joule-Thomson effect. In the new study, the micro-sized cryocooler uses two stages to cool a device. The first stage involves a single-stage cryocooler device that other researchers at the University of Twente previously designed, which cools down to 100 K (-173 °C, -180 °F) using nitrogen as the gas. In the second stage, which cools down to 30 K, the researchers used hydrogen as the gas. The reason for using two different gases is that the Joule-Thomson effect only works (i.e., produces a cooling effect) if the expanding gas is already cooled below a certain temperature called its inversion temperature. This critical temperature is different for different gases. If the gas is above this temperature, then expansion will cause the gas to warm up rather than cool down. Nitrogen has a higher inversion temperature than hydrogen, which is why the researchers used nitrogen in the pre-cooling stage, and then cooled the hydrogen through heat-exchange with the nitrogen until the hydrogen surpassed its inversion temperature of 205 K (-68 °C, -91 °F) so that it could be cooled by the second Joule-Thomson process.”30 K is sufficiently cold to cool most electronic devices such as infrared detectors, low-noise amplifiers and high-temperature superconducting devices,” Cao told Phys.org. “To cool superconducting devices based on Nb3Sn or NbTi, an even lower temperature is required. To reach even lower temperature using the Joule-Thomson effect, a helium stage is needed, in which the hydrogen stage works as a precooler for the helium stage.” (Bottom left) Photograph of the microcooler mounted into a vacuum flange and surrounded by a PCB, with gas connections. (Top right) The microcooler shown next to a euro coin for size comparison. Credit: H. S. Cao, et al. ©2013 IOP Publishing Ltd More information: H. S. Cao, et al. “Micromachined cryogenic cooler for cooling electronic devices down to 30 K.” J. Micromech. Microeng. 23 (2013) 025014 (6pp). DOI: 10.1088/0960-1317/23/2/025014 To demonstrate the feasibility of the new two-stage cryocooler, the researchers attached a YBCO film to the device to be cooled to its superconducting state. Starting from room temperature, the scientists showed that the nitrogen stage could cool the film to 94 K in about 20 minutes, and the hydrogen stage could cool the film to 30 K in an additional 40 minutes. During this cool-down process, the film reached its superconducting state, demonstrating the possibility for integrating the cryocooler with electronic devices.One of the biggest advantages of the micro-sized cryocooler is that it has the potential be fabricated at low cost on a large scale. The cooler consists of just three glass wafers ranging in thickness from 145 to 400 μm, which are etched, stacked and bonded together. A stack of wafers can also be cut into multiple microcoolers using a dicing and powder blasting process. Another benefit is that the cryocooler operates at modest pressures, ranging from 0.1 MPa (room pressure) for the low-pressure region and 8.0-8.5 MPa for the high-pressure regions. When the pressure is higher, fabrication becomes more complex, in particular the bonding process. “A 30 K micro cryocooler is the coldest micro cryocooler that has been published in academic journals,” Cao said. “W. Little previously presented a seven-wafer stack two-stage JT micro cryocooler operating at 14 MPa with a cold-end temperature of about 30 K. Our two-stage 30 K JT micro cryocooler is operated with modest pressures and realized in a stack of only three wafers. Compared to three-wafer stack micro cryocoolers, seven-wafer stack micro cryocoolers are much more difficult to fabricate with acceptable yields. Furthermore, high gas pressures add more stringent requirements to the bonding process and severely add complexity to the development of a compressor for closed-cycle operation of the cryocooler.”The researchers hope that the relatively simple device requirements and the ability to cool to cryogenic temperatures (defined as temperatures below about 120 K [-153 °C, -244 °F]) will expedite cryogenic electronics applications. Such electronic and superconducting sensors and detectors could be especially useful in medical and space applications.”In medicine, cryogenic electronic devices can be used in some diagnostic techniques, for example, tracing the spread of breast cancer cells,” Cao said. “To determine whether the cancer has spread, the traditional way is to introduce radioactive particles into the body. But the radioactivity represents a health risk for both patient and medical personnel. Another method is using magnetic particles. However, existing detectors are not sensitive enough to measure the signal of the particles. The signal-to-noise ratio of the detectors could be greatly improved by cooling. Another application could be micro cryosurgery with miniaturized cold tips (for removing cancerous tissue).”Applications of cryogenic electronic devices in space include scientific instrumentation, telecommunications and earth observation, and meteorology satellite. Many science missions in space use optical detectors that operate at cryogenic temperatures to increase their sensitivity. Radio-frequency devices (filters, delay lines, resonators and antennas) based on high-temperature superconductors have high potential to improve the energy efficiency of telecommunications systems or to reduce their size and weight. Earth observation missions require cryogenics because of the utilization of medium infrared detectors (typically operating around or just below 100 K) to image the earth surface. “For these applications, the cooler should be small, low cost, low interference and have a very long lifetime. Joule-Thomson micro cryocoolers are excellent for this, because these have no cold moving parts and therefore can be scaled down to match the size and the power consumption of these devices.”In the future, the researchers plan to experiment with using gas mixtures in order to achieve lower temperatures at lower pressures.”One of the future goals is to combine the micro cryocooler with a sorption compressor to realize a total micro system,” Cao said. “Other future research topics in this area include three-stage microcryocoolers, micro cryocoolers using double expansion cycles and the use of a gas mixture as the working fluid. To reach temperatures near the boiling point of helium gas, it is necessary to use three stages. A nitrogen stage is used to precool a hydrogen stage, which works as a precool for a helium stage. Using a double expansion cycle, a Joule-Thomson cooler can achieve a lower temperature due to the reduction of the pressure drop in the low-pressure line. Compared to pure gas, mixed gases provide equivalent cooling power with significantly lower pressure ratio.” Explore further Faster and more sensitive electronics thanks to compact cooling Citation: Electronics like it cold, and 30 K cryocooler delivers (2013, January 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-01-electronics-cold-cryocooler.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more