Lukaku opens up on the positive vibes in Uniteds squad

first_imgRomelu Lukaku revealed that Manchester United players are enjoying the happy atmosphere in training since the exit of Jose Mourinho.The Belgian forward may not be having more game time under Ole Gunnar Solskjaer, but he admitted the positive vibes in the squad has been a key factor to their success.“It’s different, a lot more positive,” he told Canal+.“People are smiling. At the moment everything is going well, and we have to continue like this. We’re enjoying it.”Lukaku further claimed everyone is getting back to their best again after a difficult start to the campaign, with the improved form of Pogba and Rashford a testimony to the assertion.“We tell him at training, Paul is happy, and then he laughs,” Lukaku disclosed via FourFourTwo.Tammy Abraham, ChelseaChelsea hat-trick hero Tammy Abraham hopes for more Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Tammy Abraham hopes this season will be his big breakthrough at Chelsea after firing his first hat-trick for the club in Saturday’s 5-2 win at Wolves.“At the moment, everyone is playing at their level. That’s what’s good. Paul, Marcus (Rashford), even myself when I play, I try to bring something to the team, Anthony (Martial). The competitive mindset is returning in every player.“You see it at training when we do mini games, 6 vs 6, 8 vs 8, you can see the players are wanting to prove themselves to the manager because they want to take their chance, but the most important remains the team. That’s what’s going to help us to return where we belong.”Up next for Manchester United is a tricky tie against relegation-threatened Fulham on Saturday.Lukaku: “This competitive spirit is coming back out of each player, it has already started in training when we play small-sided matches, 6 vs 6, 8 vs 8, you can see it the players want to prove themselves to the manager.” #MUFC #GGMU pic.twitter.com/74u1IXB7Jp— UnitedReds.com (@UnitedRedscom) February 4, 2019last_img read more

Executive Shakeup at Condé Nast

first_imgNew duties for Anna Wintour, editor of Vogue and artistic director for Condé Nast, weren’t spelled out as clearly, but Townsend commented she’ll “ensure that our content and culture remain at the forefront of our industry.”Wallace leaves the company after a lengthy tenure. He’d served as editorial director since 2005 and as editor-in-chief of Condé Nast Traveler for the 16 years prior. Bellando had been with the company for 15 years. Read the full memo below.Dear Colleagues,With good reason, Condé Nast has earned a reputation for being the very best. We have the most influential brands in media, the most sought-after audience base and the most talented employees in the business. It is with this commitment to excellence that I am pleased to share a number of strategic leadership changes we are making as part of a succession plan we started early this year.Bob Sauerberg will assume a leading role in all revenue generation activities, including taking direct responsibility for the Condé Nast Media Group, as well as brand revenue growth. This expands his areas of responsibility beyond the management of digital, technology, consumer marketing, business development, corporate administration and Condé Nast Entertainment. Lou Cona, chief revenue officer and president of CNMG, will now report to Bob.John Bellando has decided to leave the company following fifteen years of extraordinary service. John has been a respected and trusted business partner for many years and I’m grateful that he has agreed to work with us in an advisory capacity through the end of the year.David Geithner will be joining Condé Nast as CFO starting August 17. David comes to us from Time Inc., where, over the course of a highly successful 20+ year career, he led senior financial functions and served as EVP and president of the Entertainment Group. He will report to Bob, who will be sharing more about David in the coming weeks.I also want to share that Tom Wallace is departing after a distinguished career with the company. He leaves behind a legacy of editorial excellence that has been the cornerstone of our success.Anna Wintour, who last year was named the company’s artistic director, will ensure that our content and culture remain at the forefront of our industry. Bob and I will rely on her for her insights and guidance as we build the team that will lead us into the future.Bob will be making other key announcements shortly about our business direction and strategy going forward. As many of you know, Bob and I have worked side by side as CEO and president to ensure we prepare the company to reach new heights. Today’s announcement begins this seamless transition and gives me more confidence than ever that our best years are yet to come. Condé Nast’s COO and CFO, John Bellando, and editorial director, Thomas Wallace, are leaving the company, according to an internal memo from CEO Chuck Townsend released this morning.Bob Sauerberg, president of Condé Nast, is taking over “all revenue generating activities,” while David Geithner—formerly executive vice president of Time Inc.’s style and entertainment group; he was let go in February as one of several executive casualties ahead of the company’s spinoff—is being brought on as the new CFO.See also: Condé Nast Goes Big on Videolast_img read more

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT Wilmingtons Joshua Buske Named To Deans List At University Of Hartford

first_imgWEST HARTFORD, CT — The University of Hartford is pleased to announce Joshua Buske, of Wilmington, has been named to its Dean’s List for Fall 2018.Spread across seven dynamic schools and colleges, the University of Hartford has been guiding the purpose and passion of students for over six decades. On our 350-acre campus alongside Connecticut’s capital city, approximately 5,000 undergraduate and 1,800 graduate students from 48 states and 46 countries come together for a common purpose: to collaborate across different disciplines, diversify perspectives, and broaden worldviews. We’re a four-year private university focused on advancing the public good through meaningful connections within our communities. Our unique approach to comprehensive education gives us the critical perspectives that lead to impactful change, regionally and beyond. With degree programs spanning the arts, humanities, business, engineering and technology, education, and health professions, we focus on doing the work that matters.(NOTE: The above announcement is from the University of Hartford via Merit.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedSTUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Wilmington’s Joshua Buske Named To Dean’s List At University Of HartfordIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Wilmington’s Joshua Buske Named To Dean’s List At University of HartfordIn “Education”STUDENT SPOTLIGHT: Wilmington’s Joshua Buske Named To Dean’s List At University Of HartfordIn “Education”last_img read more

Road crash kills minor boy

first_imgRoad accident illustration by Prothom AloA minor boy was killed after being hit by a minibus at Hogla in Gomostapur upazila on Sunday morning.The deceased was Ibrahim, 7, son of Anarul of the village.Sub-inspector Aminul Islam of Gomostapur police station said the minibus bit Ibrahim while he was crossing the road near his house around 8 am, leaving him dead on the spot.On information, police arrested the bus driver Rabiul and seized his vehicle.last_img

Pressley Officially Massachusetts 1st Black Congresswoman

first_imgBy WILLIAM J. KOLE, Associated PressBOSTON (AP) — Ayanna Pressley didn’t campaign to make history, but she did on Tuesday, officially becoming Massachusetts’ first Black woman elected to the U.S. House of Representatives.The Democrat sailed through the general election unopposed, two months after unseating 10-term Rep. Michael Capuano in a national political stunner in the state primary.In this Oct. 1, 2018 file photo, Boston City Councilor Ayanna Pressley speaks at a rally at City Hall in Boston. On Nov. 6, Pressley became Massachusetts’ first black woman elected to the U.S. House of Representatives. (AP Photo/Mary Schwalm, File)“Activists and agitators have brought us to this very moment,” Pressley told cheering supporters Tuesday night. “None of us ran to make history. We ran to make change … and change is on the way.”“Can a congresswoman wear her hair in braids? Rock a black leather jacket?” she added — and the crowd roared.With no Republican in the race in the heavily Democratic district, her September upset victory had all but assured Pressley the keys to the office, with only the remote possibility of a write-in campaign to potentially stop her. That unlikely scenario behind her, she’ll now represent the 7th Congressional District — the first in Massachusetts where minorities make up a majority of the voting population.“It is hard to believe that in the 230-year history of our delegation, there’s never been a person of color,” she said on “Matter of Fact with Soledad O’Brien.”(Although that’s true of the House, Republican Sen. Edward Brooke of Massachusetts, who took office in 1967, was the first Black politician to be elected by popular vote after the 17th Amendment was ratified in 1913.)Pressley, 44, is also the first African-American to serve on the Boston City Council.Endorsed last month by former President Barack Obama, she got a big early boost from fellow congressional upstart Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, who similarly knocked off veteran Rep. Joe Crowley of New York in June.Both rode a rising wave of pro-woman sentiment to Washington as the party embraced diversity and liberal politics as the recipe for success in the Trump era.“With her victory tonight, Ayanna Pressley has not only made history as the first Black woman ever elected to represent Massachusetts in the U.S. House of Representatives, she’s ensured that Democrats have the voice of a young, Black progressive woman helping lead the fight for inclusive populist reforms,” the political action committee Democracy for America said Tuesday night in a statement.In the run-up to the midterms, Pressley held off on saying where she stands on Nancy Pelosi, the Democrats’ embattled House leader.From the outset, Pressley made clear that she meant serious business, telling voters before she sent Capuano packing that she viewed the race as “a fight for the soul of our party and the future of our democracy.”The district includes a wide swath of Boston and about half of Cambridge, as well as portions of neighboring Chelsea, Everett, Randolph, Somerville and Milton. It includes the neighborhood of Roxbury, the traditional center of Boston’s Black community.Ideologically, Capuano was much like Pressley: liberal, a self-described progressive. But the White, middle-aged incumbent didn’t look like many voters in his district, even though Pressley herself had bristled at the notion that race was a defining issue in the contest.She flashed that defiance during a debate, saying: “I happen to be Black and a woman and unapologetically proud to be both, but that is not the totality of my identity.”But Pressley also made clear the importance of diversity in the nation’s halls of power.“I do think that our democracy is strengthened by an engagement of new and different voices,” she told college newspaper editors in Boston in October.___For AP’s complete coverage of the U.S. midterm elections: http://apne.ws/APPoliticslast_img read more