Governor Newsom signs bill to limit use of force by police

first_img August 19, 2019 Governor Newsom signs bill to limit use of force by police Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter KUSI Newsroom KUSI Newsroom, 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Gov. Gavin Newsom today signed legislation co- authored by a San Diego lawmaker that redefines when law enforcement officers can use deadly force.AB 392, co-written by Assemblywoman Shirley Weber, D-San Diego, will hold law enforcement officers liable for homicide if an investigation finds the use of deadly force on a civilian was necessitated by the officer’s ownactions. Law enforcement will still be able to use deadly force as self- defense, but only when “necessary.”Weber co-authored the legislation, dubbed the California Act to Save Lives, with Assemblyman Kevin McCarty, D-Sacramento. Sen. Toni Atkins, D-San Diego, introduced the bill in the state Senate.“We were told by so many that it could not happen and we had felt that we were at the brink of failure at one point in this whole process,” Weber said. “I felt the weight of the families. It’s been a difficult journey because they entrusted me with trying to make change. My greatest fear is that if we had failed, those who want to make change will never work to do it again.”Weber and McCarty introduced a similar bill last year after two Sacramento police officers shot and killed Stephon Clark, an unarmed black man, but it made little progress in the legislature. Weber said she battled with former Gov. Jerry Brown and opposition from law enforcement over the bill, even threatening a hunger strike last year.The two officers were not charged in Clark’s death. Sacramento County District Attorney Anne Marie Schubert ruled in March that they were legally justified in killing Clark because they said they felt they were in imminentdanger. The decision prompted public outcry and further inflamed the national conversation about police violence and its ties to race.“It’s one thing to sign a piece of paper, pass legislation,” Newsom said. “It’s another to change hearts and minds, to change culture. To change the way people conduct themselves, to hold themselves to a higher standard …That’s the work that we, collectively as a community, need to manifest at peril of missing this moment and missing the point of this moment.”At one time, AB 392 appeared stalled again amid unresolved tensions between state legislators and law enforcement officials. That tension dissolved when the two sides struck a deal in May to amend the bill by changing “reasonable” to “necessary” and removing language mandating officers to use lethal force only after using non-lethal alternatives.As a result of the deal, state law enforcement groups like the California Highway Patrol, Peace Officers Research Association of California and California State Sheriffs’ Association shifted their official stance on the bill from opposition to neutrality.A second piece of legislation, currently mired in the Assembly’s committee process, would require law enforcement agencies to train officers in accordance with AB 392. SB 230 would also standardize de-escalation trainingrequirements statewide in an effort to ensure all stakeholders are on the same page.SB 230 is supported, in part, by a coalition of PORAC, the California Police Chiefs and the California Association of Highway Patrols.“Together, AB 392 and SB 230 will modernize our state’s policies on the use of force, implementing the very best practices gathered from across our nation,” CPCA President Ron Lawrence said. “Once both bills are signed and take effect, the real work can begin using the training made available to officers by SB 230 to implement the AB 392 standard.”Whether SB 230 will become law in addition to AB 392 remains to be seen.In May, the San Diego City Council voted 6-2 in favor of a resolution supporting the bill. The previous month, the San Diego County Board of Supervisors voted to oppose the bill.Both votes came after contentious public hearings and opposition from local law enforcement organizations like the Deputy Sheriffs’ Association of San Diego County and the San Diego Police Officers Association, which argued that law enforcement agencies already have policies designed to keep law enforcement officers in check.AB 392 passed in the Senate 34-4, with four senators declining to record a vote, while the Assembly approved it 68-0 with 12 assembly members declining to vote.It will go into effect on Jan. 1, 2020. Posted: August 19, 2019last_img read more

5 awarded Begum Rokeya Padak 2018

first_imgFive people received prestigious Begum Rokeya Padak 2018 on Sunday in recognition of their outstanding contributions to society and women empowerment, reports UNB.The awardees are Zinnatun Nesa Talukder, professor Zohra Anis, Shila Roy, Rauma Chowdhury (posthumous) and Rokeya Begum (posthumous).Prime minister Sheikh Hasina handed over the medals weighing 25 grams of 18-karat gold, cheques of Tk 200,000 and certificates among the winners and their family members at a programme held at Bangabandhu International Conference Centre (BICC) in the capital.The children and women affairs ministry organised the programme with state minister Meher Afroze Chumki in the chair. Ministry secretary Nasima Begum read out the citations.The government introduced the award in 1995 after the name of Begum Rokeya, a pioneer of women’s liberation movement in the undivided Bengal.Begum Rokeya was a leading feminist writer and social worker during the early 20th century and famous for her efforts to establish gender equality and ensure female education.last_img read more

Ahead of Panchayat polls Election Commissioner meets Governor

first_imgKolkata: State Election Commissioner A K Singh on Wednesday met Governor Keshari Nath Tripathi and briefed him about the preparations for the Panchayat elections scheduled on May 1, 3 and 5.”I briefed him about the security arrangement in place for filing of nominations and also informed him about the security measures that we are planning to put in place during the elections,” Singh told reporters while leaving Raj Bhavan after the meeting. Responding to a question on whether there were discussions about Central Force deployment, Singh only answered in the positive and did not elaborate. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsThere have been reports of violence during filing of nominations for the Panchayat polls that had begun from Monday and will continue till April 9.Top brass of the state secretariat, including Chief Secretary Moloy De, met the Governor on Wednesday.BJP workers held a demonstration outside the State Election Commission office, demanding free and fair elections.Alleging that the SEC is “incapable” of holding peaceful elections, the BJP said it has decided to move the Supreme Court with a plea to make arrangements for free and fair polls. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killedTrinamool Congress has termed the allegations as “baseless”. The BJP has filed 1,147 nominations, while CPI-M has filed 351. But still they are alleging that they are being prevented from filing nominations,” said Partha Chatterjee, minister of Parliamentary Affairs. A Trinamool Congress delegation will meet the Governor on Thursday.CPI-M state secretary Suryakanta Misra on Wednesday advised workers of all the Opposition parties to go to file the nomination together and resist if there is any violence to stop them. He criticised the State Election Commission for holding poll on the International Workers’ Day, which falls on May 1.last_img read more