The Wilmington Insider For July 17 2018

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below is a round-up of what’s going on in Wilmington on Tuesday, July 17, 2018:Happening Today:Weather: Showers and thunderstorms likely, mainly after 3pm. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 87. Southwest wind 8 to 11 mph, with gusts as high as 21 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New rainfall amounts between a tenth and quarter of an inch, except higher amounts possible in thunderstorms.At Town Hall: The Wilmington Board of Health meets at 5:30pm in Town Hall’s Room 9. Read the agenda HERE.In The Community: Wilmington’s Academy of Traditional Karate (155 West Street, Suite 5) is holding a free Self Defense Class for community members from 6:45pm to 7:45pm. The seminar will offer practical self-defense solutions, taught by instructors with years of martial arts and law enforcement experience. No martial arts experience required. Call 978-658-2077 or email TeamElite@Traditional-Karate.com for additional information.In The Community: Middlesex District Attorney Marian Ryan and The Burlington Mall will host a summer safety event from 11am to 2pm in the Mall’s parking lot, behind Primark, next to Mall Road. Attendees will be able to visit with first responders, get summer safety resources and enter a free raffle to win a toy helicopter. Car seat inspections and installations will be provided by the Burlington Police Department. Visitors can bring a new car seat to be installed or have a previously installed car seat inspected for safety. Children will have the opportunity to explore emergency vehicles from the Burlington Police Department, Burlington Fire Department, and Armstrong Ambulance. Families can stop by the Summer Safety Resource Booth with information on how to stay safe during the summer months, plus summer safety-themed games and activities.In The Community: Wilmington Friendship (Masonic) Lodge (32 Church Street) is hosting a Red Cross Blood Drive from 1pm to 7pm. Drop-ins welcome.In The Community: The Tewksbury/Wilmington Elks holds bingo — open to the public — every Tuesday. Doors open at 5pm. Pizza, hot dog and pastries are sold. Free coffee.In The Community: Angels In Motion meets every Tuesday, from 9:30am to 2:30pm, at the Wilmington Knights of Columbus Hall (112 Middlesex Avenue).  The club provides a great opportunity for seniors to meet new friends or reacquaint with old ones. A luncheon is served as noon.  Free. Handicapped accessible.In The Community: The Town Beach is open today.  Lifeguards are on duty from 10am to 8pm. Admission is FREE for residents. Proof of residency is required. Learn more HERE.At The Library: Preschool Storytime: Sounds of Nature at 10am. LEGO Building at 3pm. Teen Trivia: Musicals at 6:30pm. [Learn more and register HERE.]At The Senior Center: Walking Group at Yentile at 8am. Computer Class at 9am. Aerobics at 10:30am. Mah Jong at 1pm. Summer Brain Camp at 1pm. [Learn more HERE.](NOTE: What did I miss? Let me know by commenting below, commenting on the Facebook page, or emailing wilmingtonapple@gmail.com. I may be able to update this post.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedThe Wilmington Insider For June 25, 2018In “5 Things To Do Today”The Wilmington Insider For September 11, 2018In “5 Things To Do Today”The Wilmington Insider For October 17, 2018In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

Model predicts religiosity gene will dominate society

first_imgAll individuals, whether they have religious or secular upbringings, have a chance of defecting. Rowthorn explained that the rates of defection from religious to secular and from secular to religious preferences depend on time and place.“Amongst Christian Churches in Europe and North America, defection rates are higher than conversion rates,” he said. “In some cases, such as the Amish, these losses are greatly outweighed by their very high fertility. However, for mainstream Churches, such as the Catholics or Anglicans, the birth rate is not high enough on its own to offset defections and they rely on immigration to maintain their numbers. In certain other parts of the world, such as East Asia, mainstream Christian Churches are growing through conversion.”Rowthorn’s model shows that, even when the religious defection rate is high, the overall high fertility rate of religious people will cause the religiosity allele to eventually predominate the global society. The model shows that the wide gap in fertility rates could have a significant genetic effect in just a few generations. The model predicts that the religious fraction of the population will eventually stabilize at less than 100%, and there will remain a possibly large percentage of secular individuals. But nearly all of the secular population will still carry the religious allele, since high defection rates will spread the religious allele to secular society when defectors have children with a secular partner. Overall, nearly all of the population will have a genetic predisposition toward religion, although some or many of these individuals will lead secular lives, Rowthorn concluded.“The rate at which religious people abandon their faith affects the eventual share of the population who are religious,” Rowthorn said. “However, it does not alter the conclusion of the article that the religiosity allele will eventually take over. If the defection rate is high, there will be lots of children who are brought up as religious and carry the religiosity allele, but who give up their faith. Such people will carry the religiosity allele into the secular population with them. Many of their descendents will also carry this allele and be secular. In this case, the high fertility group is constantly sending migrants into the low-fertility secular population. Such migrations will simultaneously boost the size of the secular population and transform its genetic composition.”Rowthorn acknowledges that he can only speculate on how a genetic predisposition toward religion may manifest itself in a secular context. Previous research has suggested that a genetic predisposition toward religion is tied to a variety of characteristics such as conservatism, obedience to authority, and the inclination to follow rituals. In this instance of evolution, it’s possible that these characteristics may become widespread not for their own fitness but by hitching a ride with a high-fitness cultural practice. Study: Religious belief declines in Britain Rowthorn has developed a model that shows that the genetic components that predispose a person toward religion are currently “hitchhiking” on the back of the religious cultural practice of high fertility rates. Even if some of the people who are born to religious parents defect from religion and become secular, the religious genes they carry (which encompass other personality traits, such as obedience and conservativism) will still spread throughout society, according to the model’s numerical simulations.“Provided the fertility of religious people remains on average higher than that of secular people, the genes that predispose people towards religion will spread,” Rowthorn told PhysOrg.com. “The bigger the fertility differential between religious and secular people, the faster this genetic transformation will occur. This does not mean that everyone will become religious. Genes are not destiny. Many people who are genetically predisposed towards religion may in fact lead secular lives because of the cultural influences they have been exposed to.”The model’s assumptions are based on data from previous research. Studies have shown that, even controlling for income and education, people who are more religious have more children, on average, than people who are secular (defined here as having a religious indifference). According to the World Values Survey for 82 countries, adults attending religious services more than once per week averaged 2.5 children, those attending once per month averaged 2.01 children, and those never attending averaged 1.67 children. The more orthodox the religious sect, the higher the fertility rate, with sects such as the Amish, the Hutterites, and Haredi having up to four times as many children as the secular average. Studies have found that the high fertility rates stem from cultural and social influences by religious organizations rather than biological factors.But while fertility is determined by culture, an individual’s predisposition toward religion is likely to be influenced by genetics, in addition to their upbringing. In the model, Rowthorn uses a “religiosity gene” to represent the various genetic factors that combine to genetically predispose a person toward religion, whether remaining religious from youth or converting to religion from a secular upbringing. On the flip side, the nonreligiosity allele of this “gene” makes a person more likely to remain or become secular. If both parents have the religiosity allele, their children are also more likely to have the religiosity allele than if one or both parents did not have it. However, children born to religious parents may have the nonreligiosity allele, while children born to secular parents may have the religiosity allele. Having the religiosity allele does not make a person religious, but it makes a person more likely to have characteristics that make them religiously inclined; the converse is also true. Citation: Model predicts ‘religiosity gene’ will dominate society (2011, January 28) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-01-religiosity-gene-dominate-society.html Explore further Copyright 2010 PhysOrg.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in whole or part without the express written permission of PhysOrg.com.center_img More information: Robert Rowthorn. “Religion, fertility and genes: a dual inheritance model.” Proceedings of the Royal Society B. DOI:10.1098/rspb.2010.2504 A variety of religious symbols. A new study has investigated how the differing fertility rates between religious and secular individuals might affect the genetic evolution of society overall. Image credit: Wikimedia Commons. (PhysOrg.com) — In the past 20 years, the Amish population in the US has doubled, increasing from 123,000 in 1991 to 249,000 in 2010. The huge growth stems almost entirely from the religious culture’s high fertility rate, which is about 6 children per woman, on average. At this rate, the Amish population will reach 7 million by 2100 and 44 million by 2150. On the other hand, the growth may not continue if future generations of Amish choose to defect from the religion and if secular influences reduce the birth rate. In a new study, Robert Rowthorn, emeritus professor of economics at Cambridge University, has looked at the broader picture underlying this particular example: how will the high fertility rates of religious people throughout the world affect the future of human genetic evolution, and therefore the biological makeup of society? This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Nations Restricting International Data Flow Are Threatening the Global Digital Economy

first_imgOctober 2, 2017 Register Now » 4 min read Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. For centuries, many of the most important catalysts for global trade and economic integration have been commodities — gold, silk, spices, sugar, and of course, oil. A new global commodity — data — has the potential to unleash extraordinary opportunities that will shape the world economy of the 21st century. But realizing these opportunities depends on data moving freely across borders, a notion that was once elementary, but today is under threat.Global data flows are fundamental to the digital economy that’s contributing to economic growth, driving innovation and stimulating job creation in the United States and throughout the world. McKinsey estimates that digital trade added $2.8 trillion to global GDP growth in 2014 alone, while also finding that trade in data has expanded 45-fold in the last 10 years. Another 9x growth is expected by 2020. According to the IMF’s World Economic Outlook from October 2016, trade in physical goods, by contrast, has been growing at only about three percent annually in recent years, which is less than half the average rate of expansion over the past three decades. Perhaps most noteworthy of all, McKinsey identifies the GDP impact of cross-border digital flows — a relatively recent entry to the global economy — as exceeding the impact of trade in goods.Related: The Equifax Data Breach Shows the Limitations of How Our Data is StoredWith so many countries around the world experiencing modest economic growth rates, policymakers should be focused on maximizing the opportunities emanating from the data-driven digital economy. Regrettably, many jurisdictions have instituted measures that threaten these opportunities, with the potential to stifle the long-term growth of the digital economy.Today, 34 countries have laws and regulations in effect that hinder the flow of data across borders, either making such flows more expensive or restricting them altogether, according to the Information Technology & Innovation Foundation. These policies can be found in countries spanning multiple regions (Africa, Asia-Pacific, Europe, North America and South America) and in many of the world’s largest economies. In China, for example, companies must store their data on servers that are based in the country, and there are a number of restrictions on transferring data outside the country.  These data localization laws have the potential to balkanize the digital economy and, in the process, stifle its growth. Companies will face higher costs in a number of areas, such as IT and compliance, both of which will impinge on their competitiveness. And the restrictions will stifle the cooperation that’s fundamental to corporate innovation. The net effects will be higher costs to consumers and reduced economic output.Related: How the Virtual Data Room Boom Is Transforming Business TransactionsWhat’s the best way to combat data localization measures? There are no simple solutions, and companies are ultimately obligated to comply with the laws of the jurisdictions in which they’re operating. But given data is so intertwined with global economic activity, it behooves U.S.-based companies to press policymakers to treat data the way they treat most physical products. And that would mean enshrining the free movement of data into the world’s trade agreements.The U.S. has an immediate opportunity ahead to lead by example. It has recently started negotiations with Mexico and Canada on how to modernize the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). One of the agenda items is setting new rules for digital trade, which was largely non-existent when the agreement took effect in 1994. Negotiators should affirm the free movement of data and prohibit it from being “localized” within the borders of one country. These ideas already have mainstream support — they were agreed to as part of the 12-nation Trans-Pacific Partnership. While that agreement has not been ratified, its data provisions provide a template for the renegotiated NAFTA as well as other trade pacts.Related: If You’re a Startup Looking to Capitalize on U.S.-China Border Investments, Here’s HowThe free flow of data is one of the underpinnings of today’s global economy and has the potential to deliver far-reaching benefits — helping to make businesses more efficient, more productive and more capable of addressing customers’ needs. But realizing those opportunities depends on policymakers coming together to support a forward-looking framework that ensures data — like other commodities before it — can be a source of opportunity and prosperity for people in the U.S. and throughout the world. Free Webinar | Sept. 9: The Entrepreneur’s Playbook for Going Global Growing a business sometimes requires thinking outside the box.last_img read more