Being left out motivated me to work hard – Mallik Wilks

first_imgLoan striker Mallik Wilks says that being left out gave him the motivation he needed to work as hard as he should.The 19-year-old added that it was a lesson to him, as one should never get too comfortable, or risk losing one’s spot to another. Wilks also made a scoring return to the starting line-up in the 3-3 draw with Gillingham after he was laid back at Rochdale.“I was buzzing to get on the score sheet because I got left out of the team last week so I had to prove a point,” said the Leeds United frontman via The Star.“I had to work hard in training and play well when I came on at Rochdale, and that’s what I did.“It taught me that I cannot get too comfortable. There’s always someone fighting for your spot, which is a good thing for this team.“My performances had dropped. I was careless on the ball,” he added.Solskjaer reveals he plans to build his team around Pogba Manuel R. Medina – July 17, 2019 The Manchester United manager wants to end the speculation that the Frenchman is leaving the Red Devils.“When I saw Alfie May score two goals [against Grimsby] I thought this is a bit scary! He’s been training well to so he deserved it.”“It was disappointing to go 2-0 down and I thought it was going to be a repeat of Fleetwood but the good thing was that none of us panicked,” he said.“We played good football and we should’ve got all three points.“We’re annoyed with the sloppy goals we’ve given away and the fact we had so many shots and only scored three.” He added:“It’s a good learning curve for us, fighting all the way to the end and showing good team spirit.”last_img read more

Leaked photos show new OnePlus 7 Pro phone has Samsunglike edge screen

first_img News • Pixel 3 vs. OnePlus 6T: Which Android should you buy? Review • OnePlus 6T review: A hero phone without the sky-high price 2:48 Since the company launched its first OnePlus One in 2014, OnePlus has garnered a reputation for making phones with premium specs at a wallet-friendly price. For the past few years, OnePlus has launched two flagships a year; the phones offer reliable, high-end experiences for hundreds of dollars less than iPhones and Galaxy S devices. Editors’ Note, May 14, 2019: CNET’s OnePlus 7 Pro review​ is here. Read more about the new phone from OnePlus.   If these photos are accurate, though, that could mean the 5G phone has no front-facing camera on the front of the display, thin bezels and a 6.7-inch screen that curves on the left and right edges. The device could also have a Snapdragon 855 processor, 8GB of RAM and a triple rear camera setup with a 48-, 16- and 8-megapixel camera. CNET may get a commission from retail offers. In addition to launching the OnePlus 7, expected sometime in the spring, the company will release a separate 5G phone slated for May. It’s unclear which of these phones these photos depict, but given that the device name listed is “OnePlus 7 Pro,” this could be OnePlus’ 5G phone. However, because these popped up on unofficial channels and OnePlus declined to comment on them, it’s best to remain skeptical. See it Share your voice 14 Photos OnePlus 6T shrinks the notch for added screen Supposed images of an upcoming OnePlus phone were leaked yesterday on the Chinese social networking site Weibo. The account that posted it, which goes by the username IT Station, uploaded two photos: one that included the phone’s edge, which resembles the edges seen on high-end Samsung phones, and another that listed key hardware specs.center_img Mentioned Above OnePlus 6T (Midnight Black 128GB) IT Station OnePlus 6T’s in-screen fingerprint reader looks to the… OnePlus 6T Phones 2 Tags Comments Now playing: Watch this: $453 Rumors OnePluslast_img read more

Rock weathering may have led to Snowball Earth

first_imgComparison of unweathered (left) and weathered Ordovician limestone at a roadcut on the State College Bypass, U.S. Route 322. Credit: Wikipedia. Meteorite study suggests Mars’ ancient atmosphere may be locked in its rocky terrain Scientists believe that the Earth has experienced many episodes of global glaciation—where the entire planet is covered in ice, resulting in what is loosely termed, a “Snowball Earth.” To better understand climate change heading into the future, scientists look to the past. In this latest effort, the research team looked at an event known as the Sturtian glaciation—after a billion years with no ice on the planet at all, suddenly, the Earth was covered with the stuff for 55 million years. Until now, why this happened has been a mystery.To find out more, the team traveled to the Mackenzie Mountains—a part of the planet that has been found to be useful for plotting the past due to its glacial history. The researchers collected sedimentary rocks left by glacial movement along with rock samples found above and below them.The rock samples were all taken back to the lab where the researchers tested them for osmium and rhenium levels—the latter breaks down to the former over time, offering a way to determine the age of the rocks. Using this technique, the researchers were able to conclude that the Sturtian lasted for approximately 55 million years. The team also tested the rock samples for isotopes of the same two elements and that led to the discovery that carbon dioxide had been sequestered in them. This led to the development of a theory that suggests that volcanic activity prior to the Sturtian also led to the absorption of so much carbon dioxide (weathering opens up rock causing it to be more absorbent) from the atmosphere that the planet cooled until it eventually became a Snowball Earth.Moving forward, the question of whether the Sturtian was truly one long event, or if it was actually a time of many glacial increases and retreats will be further studied to better understand the mechanism behind such global extremes. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. © 2013 Phys.orgcenter_img More information: Re-Os geochronology and coupled Os-Sr isotope constraints on the Sturtian snowball Earth, PNAS, Published online before print December 16, 2013, DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1317266110 AbstractAfter nearly a billion years with no evidence for glaciation, ice advanced to equatorial latitudes at least twice between 717 and 635 Mya. Although the initiation mechanism of these Neoproterozoic Snowball Earth events has remained a mystery, the broad synchronicity of rifting of the supercontinent Rodinia, the emplacement of large igneous provinces at low latitude, and the onset of the Sturtian glaciation has suggested a tectonic forcing. We present unique Re-Os geochronology and high-resolution Os and Sr isotope profiles bracketing Sturtian-age glacial deposits of the Rapitan Group in northwest Canada. Coupled with existing U-Pb dates, the postglacial Re-Os date of 662.4 ± 3.9 Mya represents direct geochronological constraints for both the onset and demise of a Cryogenian glaciation from the same continental margin and suggests a 55-My duration of the Sturtian glacial epoch. The Os and Sr isotope data allow us to assess the relative weathering input of old radiogenic crust and more juvenile, mantle-derived substrate. The preglacial isotopic signals are consistent with an enhanced contribution of juvenile material to the oceans and glacial initiation through enhanced global weatherability. In contrast, postglacial strata feature radiogenic Os and Sr isotope compositions indicative of extensive glacial scouring of the continents and intense silicate weathering in a post–Snowball Earth hothouse. (Phys.org) —A team of researchers conducting a field study in the Mackenzie Mountains in northwest Canada is suggesting rock weathering almost a billion years ago, may have led to the entire planet being encased in ice for 55 million years. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the multi-national team describes their field study and subsequent analysis of rock samples they retrieved and how doing so led to what they believe is an explanation of one of the most dramatic instances of climate change on record. Explore further Citation: Rock weathering may have led to ‘Snowball Earth’ (2013, December 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2013-12-weathering-snowball-earth.htmllast_img read more