The Wilmington Insider For November 1 2018

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Below is a round-up of what’s going on in Wilmington on Thursday, November 1, 2018:Happening Today:Weather: Showers likely, mainly between 11am and noon, then a chance of rain after noon. Patchy fog between 10am and 3pm. Otherwise, cloudy, with a high near 55. Calm wind. Chance of precipitation is 60%. New precipitation amounts of less than a tenth of an inch possible.Early Voting: Early voting continues today! The Town of Wilmington is offering early voting, from 8:30am to 4:30pm, in the Town Hall Auditorium.In The Community: The Wilmington Health Department is hosting a Flu Clinic for Wilmington’s youth (ages 5-18) on Thursday, November 1, 2018, from 3:30pm to 5:30pm, at Wilmington Town Hall.This flu clinic is BY APPOINTMENT ONLY. Register your child(ren) HERE.Here is what you need to know about the town’s flu clinics:Free of Charge.Nasal and Injectable will be available.Remember to bring your insurance cards.Vaccine will be available even if you do not have insurance.Anyone allergic to eggs or egg products must not take this vaccine.Anyone with a fever should delay vaccination.All minors must be accompanied by a parent or guardian.If you have a question, please contact the Wilmington Health Department at 978-658-4298.In The Community: Wilmington seniors are invited to a FREE Thanksgiving dinner at the Tewksbury/Wilmington Elks (777 South Street, Tewksbury). Doors open at 5pm. Dinner begins at 6:30pm. This annul event, sponsored by the Elks, will also feature raffle prizes and dancing. Interested seniors should reserve their free tickets at the Senior Center’s Front Desk. The Elks are holding a similar event for Tewksbury seniors the following week.In The Community:  Wilmington Youth Soccer has organized its Second Annual “Treats For Troops” collection from Thursday, November 1, 2018 through Saturday, November 3, 2018 at the Shawsheen School Fields.  (Collections will take place from 5pm to 6pm on Thursday and Friday, and 8:45am to 3pm on Saturday.) Wilmington Youth Soccer players are encouraged to donate their leftover Halloween candy. Candy should be placed in the marked boxes. Candy will be donated to Wellesley Dental Group’s 11th Annual Community Candy Drive, which benefits the U.S. Troops serving overseas. Have a question? Contact Bill Lanagan at wlanagan[at]thayer.org.In The Community: The Wilmington Community Chorus rehearses every Thursday, from 7pm to 9pm, at St. Elizabeth’s (4 Forest Street). New members welcome. No tryout required. Learn more HERE.At The Library: Thursday Baby Times at 9:30am. Time for Twos at 10:30am. LEGO Building at 3:45pm. Tech Buddies Drop-In at 6:30pm. Pints & Pages Book Group at 7pm. Jerry Thornton talks about his new Patriots book, “Five Rings” at 7pm. [Learn more and register HERE.]At The Senior Center: Walking Group at 8am. Art Class at 10am. Aerobics at 10:30am. Knitting/Crocheting at 11am. Game Day at 1pm. Ceramics at 1pm. [Learn more HERE.]At Town Museum: The Town Museum (430 Salem Street) is open from 10am to 2pm. Come explore Wilmington’s history. Free admission.(NOTE: What did I miss? Let me know by commenting below, commenting on the Facebook page, or emailing wilmingtonapple@gmail.com. I may be able to update this post.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Related5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Monday, July 15, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”5 Things To Do In Wilmington On Tuesday, September 3, 2019In “5 Things To Do Today”The Wilmington Insider For October 23, 2018In “5 Things To Do Today”last_img read more

US urges Myanmar to help implement Annan Commission recommendations

first_imgUS State Department spokesperson Heather Nauert. Photo: ReutersThe USA has urged the Myanmar government to fulfil its commitment to work with UNHCR and UNDP to implement the recommendations of the Kofi Annan-led Advisory Commission on Rakhine State.”We welcome the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) by UNHCR, UNDP, and the Myanmar government to support the creation of conditions conducive to the voluntary, safe, dignified, and sustainable return of Rohingya refugees to Burma, whether to their places of origin or of their choosing,” US Department of State spokesperson Heather Nauert said on Thursday.Nauert said this is a positive step and they see this MoU as a confidence-building measure that, if effectively implemented, could allow much-needed humanitarian assistance to reach all the affected communities and assist Myanmar in creating the necessary conditions for voluntary return and to support recovery and resilience-based development for the benefit of all communities living in Rakhine State.last_img read more

Road crash kills minor boy

first_imgRoad accident illustration by Prothom AloA minor boy was killed after being hit by a minibus at Hogla in Gomostapur upazila on Sunday morning.The deceased was Ibrahim, 7, son of Anarul of the village.Sub-inspector Aminul Islam of Gomostapur police station said the minibus bit Ibrahim while he was crossing the road near his house around 8 am, leaving him dead on the spot.On information, police arrested the bus driver Rabiul and seized his vehicle.last_img

Scientists pin down causes of dust eruptions

first_imgIn the large image, particles in a pile of graphite powder erupt due to illumination with a red laser. The laser heats particles just below the surface the most, causing surface particles to jump up due to photophoresis and the solid state greenhouse effect. The inset is an eruption of vitreous carbon. The images are long exposures, and the laser was slowly moved to excite different locations. Photo credit: Gerhard Wurm and Oliver Krauss. Citation: Scientists pin down causes of dust eruptions (2006, April 18) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2006-04-scientists-pin-eruptions.html When the physicists turned the laser off, they observed an intriguing effect. The point where the temperature gradient changes (the highest temperature) moves deeper into the dust bed. In the tenths of seconds after the laser is turned off, the photophoretic force increases further below the surface, causing larger aggregates to be ejected from the upper part of the bed.“When you turn off the laser, the normal cooling begins,” explained Wurm. “And since the temperature gradient at the surface is largest in absolute terms, heat flows in this direction better, which is why the maximum has to shift further into the sample.”Because photophoresis works best in low-pressure environments (10 mbar used in this experiment), it would be rare to observe the force naturally acting on dust particles near the surface of the Earth. However, in the early days of Earth – as well as other planets and stars – photophoretic ejection at sub-mbar pressures likely played a role in the growth of gas-dust disks, which in turn triggered the formation of asteroids and Kuiper belt objects.For future applications, the physicists theorize that Mars’ low surface pressure make the planet a candidate to host the photophoretic force. For example, with the equipment used on Mars exploration missions, photophoretic technology could aid in the removal of dust from solar panels and lenses. Further, the scientists consider creating a solar sail that would be powered by the photophoretic force instead of radiation pressure.“You could construct a fabric which would look, for example, like a fisher-net with micron or sub-micron-sized fibers,” explained Wurm. “The individual fibers would have ‘negative photophoresis,’ which occurs when particles are pulled by the light after being ejected, and the whole net should be lifted by light. With negative photophoresis, I’d guess a sail might carry a few times its own weight just by ‘passive’ sunlight. . . Say a 10 meter by 10 meter sail might carry a few tens of kilograms.”Wurm and Krauss also speculate on the possibility of fabricating an artificial surface that would optimize photophoretic forces on Earth, as well as industrial applications. Because all these possibilities are based on studies of “dirt,” these experiments take advantage of something often considered an everyday nuisance.“With modern physics, it is hard to come by the effects we observed here because everyone is proud of working in a clean environment at ‘perfect’ vacuum,” said Wurm. “This is fantastic, but you never see photophoretic effects there. You need the gas, the ‘bad’ vacuum, and you need the dirty surfaces.“With respect to planet formation, dust really holds the clues to our origins. The word ‘dust’ implies rather negative feelings because it is related to dirt in everyday life. Dust is everywhere. We will never love it and we can’t leave it. You could call it micro- or even nanoscience and it might sound a little better and fancier for research – but we’re still talking about dust, whatever name tag you put on it.”Citation: Wurm, Gerhard and Krauss, Oliver. Dust Eruptions by Photophoresis and Solid State Greenhouse Effects. Physical Review Letters 96, 134301 (2006).By Lisa Zyga, Copyright 2006 PhysOrg.com By simple light and heat mechanisms, dust particles seem to defy gravity and leap up into the air. The effect, which once played a role in the formation of the Earth and asteroids, could also have applications in dust removal and even propel small probes on Mars. When shining a red laser beam on a pile of dust, some dust particles will jump up, apparently erupting in a fountain of dust strands (see image). In studying the mechanisms behind the erupting dust, scientists Gerhard Wurm and Oliver Krauss from the University of Munster found two causes working together that explain their observations: photophoresis and the solid state greenhouse effect.Photophoresis – or the movement of particles due to light – is based on a long-known effect called thermophoresis – or the movement of particles due to heat transfer. Essentially, in environments with temperature gradients, particles will migrate from hotter to cooler regions due to the thermophoretic force. When light absorption serves as the heat source, the mechanism is called the photophoretic force.In addition to the presence of a temperature-gradient surface, Wurm and Krauss found that the solid state greenhouse effect also plays a role in dust eruptions. This greenhouse effect occurs because the laser beam heats up dust particles slightly below the surface (at least 100 micrometers, which encompasses several tens of particle layers) the most. In a recent Physical Review Letters, the scientists describe how coupling photophoresis with this greenhouse effect means that surface dust particles will strive to migrate away from hot underlying particles – and that direction is up. The team found that the pull-off force for a spherical micron-size particle is around 10-7 N. On average, about a million particles are needed to overcome cohesion.“We observed particles jump up to 5 cm,” Wurm told PhysOrg.com. “You should get them to 10 cm but this might not be the limit. The limit probably depends strongly on the dust powder, its size distribution, cohesion and the light source.”With 50 mW laser power, radiation can penetrate a dust bed to a depth up to a few millimeters. While the temperature generally decreases deeper into the dust bed, the temperature actually peaks not at the surface, but around a depth of 100 micrometers. This reversed temperature gradient near the surface causes aggregates of dust grains to be ejected.center_img Explore further This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Hard soil, big jumps and epiphanies: what it’s like on the Moonlast_img read more